272

I am getting the following error

Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'setState' of undefined

even after binding delta in the constructor.

class Counter extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);

        this.state = {
            count : 1
        };

        this.delta.bind(this);
    }

    delta() {
        this.setState({
            count : this.state.count++
        });
    }

    render() {
        return (
            <div>
                <h1>{this.state.count}</h1>
                <button onClick={this.delta}>+</button>
            </div>
        );
    }
}

17 Answers 17

391

This is due to this.delta not being bound to this.

In order to bind set this.delta = this.delta.bind(this) in the constructor:

constructor(props) {
    super(props);

    this.state = {
        count : 1
    };

    this.delta = this.delta.bind(this);
}

Currently, you are calling bind. But bind returns a bound function. You need to set the function to its bound value.

  • 164
    What on earth is the point of ES6 classes if their methods don't have proper lexical this binding, and then don't even expose a syntax for binding their context directly on their definition!? – AgmLauncher Oct 18 '16 at 0:34
  • 1
    i understand your point but if i write code in componentWillMount() then how will i bind – suresh pareek Jul 31 '17 at 12:54
  • 1
    @sureshpareek Once you bind your function in the constructor, it should then be bound when you call it from any lifecycle hook. – Levi Fuller Nov 20 '17 at 21:48
  • 3
    Coming from android/java world I'm baffled – Tudor May 5 '18 at 20:48
  • 1
    @AgmLauncher use of Lambda functions implicitly bind this. If you defined delta as delta = () => { return this.setState({ count: this.state.count++ }); }; the code would also work. Explained here: hackernoon.com/… – K. Rhoda Apr 10 at 17:25
123

In ES7+ (ES2016) you can use the experimental function bind syntax operator :: to bind. It is a syntactic sugar and will do the same as Davin Tryon's answer.

You can then rewrite this.delta = this.delta.bind(this); to this.delta = ::this.delta;


For ES6+ (ES2015) you can also use the ES6+ arrow function (=>) to be able to use this.

delta = () => {
    this.setState({
        count : this.state.count + 1
    });
}

Why ? From the Mozilla doc :

Until arrow functions, every new function defined its own this value [...]. This proved to be annoying with an object-oriented style of programming.

Arrow functions capture the this value of the enclosing context [...]

  • 3
    Nice article describing this in detail: reactkungfu.com/2015/07/… – Edo Jun 9 '16 at 10:59
  • What is the advantage of using one over the other, besides the syntax? – Jeremy D Nov 8 '16 at 19:52
  • 2
    The bind syntax is cleaner because you can keep the normal scope of your method. – Fabien Sa Nov 8 '16 at 22:02
  • The bind syntax is not part of ES2016 or ES2017. – Felix Kling Sep 22 '17 at 14:12
  • 1
    @stackoverflow should add the ability to add a bounty to any answer. – Ga Sacchi Oct 8 '18 at 5:27
29

There is a difference of context between ES5 and ES6 class. So, there will be a little difference between the implementations as well.

Here is the ES5 version:

var Counter = React.createClass({
    getInitialState: function() { return { count : 1 }; },
    delta: function() {
        this.setState({
            count : this.state.count++
        });
    },
    render: function() {
        return (
            <div>
              <h1>{this.state.count}</h1>
              <button onClick={this.delta}>+</button>
            </div>
            );
    }
});

and here is the ES6 version:

class Counter extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.state = { count : 1 };
    }

    delta() {
        this.setState({
            count : this.state.count++
        });
    }

    render() {
        return (
            <div>
              <h1>{this.state.count}</h1>
              <button onClick={this.delta.bind(this)}>+</button>
            </div>
            );
    }
}

Just be careful, beside the syntax difference in the class implementation, there is a difference in the event handler binding.

In the ES5 version, it's

              <button onClick={this.delta}>+</button>

In the ES6 version, it's:

              <button onClick={this.delta.bind(this)}>+</button>
21

When using ES6 code in React always use arrow functions, because the this context is automatically binded with it

Use this:

(videos) => {
    this.setState({ videos: videos });
    console.log(this.state.videos);
};

instead of:

function(videos) {
    this.setState({ videos: videos });
    console.log(this.state.videos);
};
  • 2
    If using the arrow function and the parameter variable is the same as the key variable, I would recommend using it as this.setState({videos}); – jayeshkv Jul 29 '17 at 22:13
  • This is what did it for me. I'm new to node, and the docs for the axios module was incompatible with react and setState – dabobert Jan 2 at 22:05
16

You dont have to bind anything, Just use Arrow functions like this:

class Counter extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);

        this.state = {
            count: 1
        };

    }
    //ARROW FUNCTION
    delta = () => {
        this.setState({
            count: this.state.count++
        });
    }

    render() {
        return (
            <div>
                <h1>{this.state.count}</h1>
                <button onClick={this.delta}>+</button>
            </div>
        );
    }
}
  • that works what's the difference please why is that? – Rida Nov 4 '18 at 1:33
  • 3
    The this scope with arrow functions is inherited from the context. With regular functions, this always refers to the nearest function, while with arrow functions this problem is removed, and you won't need to write var that = this ever again. @RezzagRidha – Gabo Ruiz Nov 6 '18 at 3:30
  • As of 2019 this is the way to go (Y) – Matthew Jun 5 at 16:24
6

You can also use:

<button onClick={()=>this.delta()}>+</button>

Or:

<button onClick={event=>this.delta(event)}>+</button>

If you are passing some params..

  • It is bad practice to use arrow functions in JSX – Ga Sacchi Oct 9 '18 at 3:56
5

You need to bind this to the constructor and remember that changes to constructor needs restarting the server. Or else, you will end with the same error.

  • 1
    Was pulling my hair out because i didn't restart the server. – kurtcorbett Jan 27 '16 at 7:10
5

You have to bind your methods with 'this' (default object). So whatever your function may be just bind that in the constructor.

constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = { checked:false };

    this.handleChecked = this.handleChecked.bind(this);
}

handleChecked(){
    this.setState({
        checked: !(this.state.checked)
    })
}

render(){
    var msg;

    if(this.state.checked){
        msg = 'checked'
    }
    else{
        msg = 'not checked'
    }

    return (
        <div>               
            <input type='checkbox' defaultChecked = {this.state.checked} onChange = {this.handleChecked} />
            <h3>This is {msg}</h3>
        </div>
    );
3

This error can be resolved by various methods-

  • If you are using ES5 syntax, then as per React js Documentation you have to use bind method.

    Something like this for the above example:

    this.delta = this.delta.bind(this)

  • If you are using ES6 syntax,then you need not use bind method,you can do it with something like this:

    delta=()=>{ this.setState({ count : this.state.count++ }); }

1

you have to bind new event with this keyword as i mention below...

class Counter extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);

        this.state = {
            count : 1
        };

        this.delta = this.delta.bind(this);
    }

    delta() {
        this.setState({
            count : this.state.count++
        });
    }

    render() {
        return (
            <div>
                <h1>{this.state.count}</h1>
                <button onClick={this.delta}>+</button>
            </div>
        );
      }
    }
1

Adding

onClick={this.delta.bind(this)}

will solve the problem . this error comes when we try to call the function of ES6 class , So we need to bind the method.

1

Arrow function could have make your life more easier to avoid binding this keyword. Like so:

 delta = () => {
       this.setState({
           count : this.state.count++
      });
   }
1

There are two solutions of this issue:

The first solution is add a constructor to your component and bind your function like bellow:

constructor(props) {
        super(props);

        ...

        this.delta = this.delta.bind(this);
    }

So do this:

this.delta = this.delta.bind(this); 

Instead of this:

this.delta.bind(this);

The second solution is to use an arrow function instead:

delta = () => {
       this.setState({
           count : this.state.count++
      });
   }

Actually arrow function DOES NOT bind it’s own this. Arrow Functions lexically bind their context so this actually refers to the originating context.

For more information about bind function:

Bind function Understanding JavaScript Bind ()

For more information about arrow function:

Javascript ES6 — Arrow Functions and Lexical this

0

though this question had a solution already, I just want to share mine to make it be cleared, hope it could help:

/* 
 * The root cause is method doesn't in the App's context 
 * so that it can't access other attributes of "this".
 * Below are few ways to define App's method property
 */
class App extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
     this.sayHi = 'hello';
     // create method inside constructor, context = this
     this.method = ()=> {  console.log(this.sayHi) };

     // bind method1 in constructor into context 'this'
     this.method1 = this.method.bind(this)
  }

  // method1 was defined here
  method1() {
      console.log(this.sayHi);
  }

  // create method property by arrow function. I recommend this.
  method2 = () => {
      console.log(this.sayHi);
  }
   render() {
   //....
   }
}
0
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8" />
    <title>Hello World</title>

    <script src="https://unpkg.com/react@0.14.8/dist/react.min.js"></script>
    <script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@0.14.8/dist/react-dom.min.js"></script>
    <script src="https://unpkg.com/babel-standalone@6.15.0/babel.min.js"></script>

  </head>
  <body>
  <div id="root"></div>
    <script type="text/babel">

        class App extends React.Component{

            constructor(props){
                super(props);
                this.state = {
                    counter : 0,
                    isToggle: false
                }
            this.onEventHandler = this.onEventHandler.bind(this);   
            }

            increment = ()=>{
                this.setState({counter:this.state.counter + 1});
            }

            decrement= ()=>{
                if(this.state.counter > 0 ){
                this.setState({counter:this.state.counter - 1});    
                }else{
                this.setState({counter:0});             
                }
            }
            // Either do it as onEventHandler = () => {} with binding with this  // object. 
            onEventHandler(){
                this.setState({isToggle:!this.state.isToggle})
                alert('Hello');
            }


            render(){
                return(
                    <div>
                        <button onClick={this.increment}> Increment </button>
                        <button onClick={this.decrement}> Decrement </button>
                        {this.state.counter}
                        <button onClick={this.onEventHandler}> {this.state.isToggle ? 'Hi':'Ajay'} </button>

                    </div>
                    )
            }
        }
        ReactDOM.render(
        <App/>,
        document.getElementById('root'),
      );
    </script>
  </body>
  </html>
0

Just change your bind statement from what you have to => this.delta = this.delta.bind(this);

0
  1. Check state check state whether you create particular property or not

this.state = {
            name: "",
            email: ""
            }
            
           
            
this.setState(() => ({ 
             comments: comments          //comments not available in state
             })) 

2.Check the (this) if you doing setState inside any function (i.e handleChange) check whether the function bind to this or the function should be arrow function .

## 3 ways for binding this to the below function##

//3 ways for binding this to the below function

handleNameChange(e) {  
     this.setState(() => ({ name }))
    }
    
// 1.Bind while callling function
      onChange={this.handleNameChange.bind(this)}
      
      
//2.make it as arrow function
     handleNameChange((e)=> {  
     this.setState(() => ({ name }))
     })
    
//3.Bind in constuctor 

constructor(props) {
        super(props)
        this.state = {
            name: "",
            email: ""
        }
        this.handleNameChange = this.handleNameChange.bind(this)
        }

protected by Aniket Thakur Apr 16 at 13:00

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