137

In Java, Arrays.equals() allows to easily compare the content of two basic arrays (overloads are available for all the basic types).

Is there such a thing in C#? Is there any "magic" way of comparing the content of two arrays in C#?

  • 1
    Added '.net' to the tags because this technique could be used in other similar .net based languages. – Evan Plaice Jul 13 '10 at 6:03
  • 3
    To everyone reading this, keep in mind that the accepted answer is using SequenceEqual. SequenceEqual not only checks if they contain the same data, but also if they contain the same data in the same order – John Demetriou Dec 22 '16 at 11:18

11 Answers 11

208

You could use SequenceEqual. This works for any IEnumerable<T>, not just arrays.

  • This only works if they are in the same order though – John Demetriou Feb 12 '16 at 7:00
  • SequenceEqual may not be a good choice performance wise, because its current implementation may fully enumerates one of its sources if they differ only by length. With arrays, we could check Length equality first, in order to avoid enumerating arrays of different lengths just to end-up yielding false. – Frédéric Feb 14 at 11:44
53

Use SequenceEqual in LINQ.

int[] arr1 = new int[] { 1,2,3};
int[] arr2 = new int[] { 3,2,1 };

Console.WriteLine(arr1.SequenceEqual(arr2)); // false
Console.WriteLine(arr1.Reverse().SequenceEqual(arr2)); // true
  • Keep in mind that this throws for null arguments, so make sure to not assume that new int[] {1}.SequenceEquals(null) == false – sara Dec 1 '15 at 10:59
27

Also for arrays (and tuples) you can use new interfaces from .NET 4.0: IStructuralComparable and IStructuralEquatable. Using them you can not only check equality of arrays but also compare them.

static class StructuralExtensions
{
    public static bool StructuralEquals<T>(this T a, T b)
        where T : IStructuralEquatable
    {
        return a.Equals(b, StructuralComparisons.StructuralEqualityComparer);
    }

    public static int StructuralCompare<T>(this T a, T b)
        where T : IStructuralComparable
    {
        return a.CompareTo(b, StructuralComparisons.StructuralComparer);
    }
}

{
    var a = new[] { 1, 2, 3 };
    var b = new[] { 1, 2, 3 };
    Console.WriteLine(a.Equals(b)); // False
    Console.WriteLine(a.StructuralEquals(b)); // True
}
{
    var a = new[] { 1, 3, 3 };
    var b = new[] { 1, 2, 3 };
    Console.WriteLine(a.StructuralCompare(b)); // 1
}
  • Pardon me, should that be a 1 or a 0 in a.StructuralCompare(b)? – mafu Jan 1 '15 at 14:36
  • On large value type arrays, there is a performance hit in using these, because their current implementation will box each value to compare. – Frédéric Feb 14 at 11:53
17

For .NET 4.0 and higher you can compare elements in array or tuples via using StructuralComparisons type:

object[] a1 = { "string", 123, true };
object[] a2 = { "string", 123, true };

Console.WriteLine (a1 == a2);        // False (because arrays is reference types)
Console.WriteLine (a1.Equals (a2));  // False (because arrays is reference types)

IStructuralEquatable se1 = a1;
//Next returns True
Console.WriteLine (se1.Equals (a2, StructuralComparisons.StructuralEqualityComparer)); 
  • Edit: Spoke too soon. Can I do the StructualEqualityCompare with IStructuralComparable? I want to call CompareTo with two arrays of objects to find out which one comes "first". I tried IStructuralComparable se1 = a1; Console.WriteLine(se1.CompareTo(a2, StructuralComparisons.StructuralEqualityComparer)); Getting: cannot convert from 'System.Collections.IEqualityComparer' to 'System.Collections.IComparer' – shindigo Mar 21 '16 at 15:55
  • 1
    OK - the correct call is: IStructuralComparable se1 = a1; Console.WriteLine(se1.CompareTo(a2, StructuralComparisons.StructuralComparer)); – shindigo Mar 22 '16 at 13:29
12

SequenceEqual will only return true if two conditions or met.

  1. They contain the same elements.
  2. The elements are in the same order.

If you only want to check if they contain the same elements regardless of their order and your problem is of the type

Does values2 contain all the values contained in values1?

you can use LINQ extension method Enumerable.Except and then check if the result has any value. Here's an example

int[] values1 = { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
int[] values2 = { 1, 2, 5 };
var result = values1.Except(values2);
if(result.Count()==0)
{
   //They are the same
}
else
{
    //They are different
}

And also by using this you get the different items as well automatically. Two birds with one stone.

Keep in mind, if you execute your code like this

var result = values2.Except(values1);

you will get different results.

In my case I have a local copy of an array and want to check if anything has been removed from the original array so I use this method.

  • 1
    Arrays containing the same values in different order, simply are NOT EQUAL. Do you thing 'Demetriou' == 'uoirtemeD' ? – edc65 Feb 3 at 10:58
7

For unit tests, you can use CollectionAssert.AreEqual instead of Assert.AreEqual.

It is probably the easiest way.

4

If you would like to handle null inputs gracefully, and ignore the order of items, try the following solution:

static class Extensions
{
    public static bool ItemsEqual<TSource>(this TSource[] array1, TSource[] array2)
    {
        if (array1 == null && array2 == null)
            return true;
        if (array1 == null || array2 == null)
            return false;
        return array1.Count() == array2.Count() && !array1.Except(array2).Any();
    }
}

The test code looks like:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int[] a1 = new int[] { 1, 2, 3 };
        int[] a2 = new int[] { 3, 2, 1 };
        int[] a3 = new int[] { 1, 3 };
        int[] a4 = null;
        int[] a5 = null;
        int[] a6 = new int[0];

        Console.WriteLine(a1.ItemsEqual(a2)); // Output: True.
        Console.WriteLine(a2.ItemsEqual(a3)); // Output: False.
        Console.WriteLine(a4.ItemsEqual(a5)); // Output: True. No Exception.
        Console.WriteLine(a4.ItemsEqual(a3)); // Output: False. No Exception.
        Console.WriteLine(a5.ItemsEqual(a6)); // Output: False. No Exception.
    }
}
2

For some applications may be better:

string.Join(",", arr1) == string.Join(",", arr2)
0

elementwise compare ? what about

public void Linq78a()
{
 int[] numbers1 = { 5, 4, 1, 3, 9, 8, 6, 7, 2, 0 };
 int[] numbers = { 5, 4, 1, 3, 9, 8, 6, 7, 2, 0 };
 bool bb = numbers.Zip(numbers1, (a, b) => (a == b)).Any(p => !p);
 if (!bb) Console.WriteLine("Lists are equal (bb)");
   else Console.WriteLine("Lists are not equal (bb)");
}

Replace the (a==b) condition by anything you'd like to compare in a and b.

(this combines two examples from MSDN developer Linq samples)

  • 1
    It does not handle arrays of different lengths (may incorrectly yield true) and null arrays (will crash). – Frédéric Feb 14 at 12:52
0

I did this in visual studios and it worked perfectly; comparing arrays index by index with short this code.

private void compareButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            int[] answer = { 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 5, 4, 0, 6 };
            int[] exam = { 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 9, 5, 4, 0, 7 };

            int correctAnswers = 0;
            int wrongAnswers = 0;

            for (int index = 0; index < answer.Length; index++)
            {
                if (answer[index] == exam[index])
                {
                    correctAnswers += 1;
                }
                else
                {
                    wrongAnswers += 1;
                }
            }

            outputLabel.Text = ("The matching numbers are " + correctAnswers +
                "\n" + "The non matching numbers are " + wrongAnswers);
        }

the output will be; The matching numbers are 7 The non matching numbers are 3

  • 1
    It does not handle arrays of different lengths (will crash), null arrays (will crash too), and it does something else than what the OP asked. He only asked to know equality, without counting how many items differ or match. – Frédéric Feb 14 at 12:48
0

Assuming array equality means both arrays have equal elements at equal indexes, there is the SequenceEqual answer and the IStructuralEquatable answer.

But both have drawbacks, performance wise.

SequenceEqual current implementation will not shortcut when the arrays have different lengths, and so it may enumerate one of them entirely, comparing each of its elements.

IStructuralEquatable is not generic and may cause boxing of each compared value. Moreover it is not very straightforward to use and already calls for coding some helper methods hiding it away.

It may be better, performance wise, to use something like:

bool ArrayEquals<T>(T[] first, T[] second)
{
    if (first == second)
        return true;
    if (first == null || second = null)
        return false;
    if (first.Length != second.Length)
        return false;
    for (var i = 0; i < first.Length; i++)
    {
        if (first[i] != second[i])
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

But of course, that is not either some "magic way" of checking array equality.

So currently, no, there is not really an equivalent to Java Arrays.equals() in .Net.

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