158

I'm looking for a way to update dict dictionary1 with the contents of dict update wihout overwriting levelA

dictionary1={'level1':{'level2':{'levelA':0,'levelB':1}}}
update={'level1':{'level2':{'levelB':10}}}
dictionary1.update(update)
print dictionary1
{'level1': {'level2': {'levelB': 10}}}

I know that update deletes the values in level2 because it's updating the lowest key level1.

How could I tackle this, given that dictionary1 and update can have any length?

| improve this question | | | | |
  • Is the nesting always three levels deep or can you have nesting of an arbitrary depth? – ChristopheD Jul 12 '10 at 23:03
  • It can have any depth/length. – jay_t Jul 13 '10 at 7:55
  • Correct me if I’m wrong but it seems like the ideal solution here requires implementation of the composite design pattern. – Alexander McNulty Mar 21 '19 at 18:34
  • a new Q stackoverflow.com/questions/59004746/… – user7337353 Nov 23 '19 at 5:17

23 Answers 23

260

@FM's answer has the right general idea, i.e. a recursive solution, but somewhat peculiar coding and at least one bug. I'd recommend, instead:

Python 2:

import collections

def update(d, u):
    for k, v in u.iteritems():
        if isinstance(v, collections.Mapping):
            d[k] = update(d.get(k, {}), v)
        else:
            d[k] = v
    return d

Python 3:

import collections.abc

def update(d, u):
    for k, v in u.items():
        if isinstance(v, collections.abc.Mapping):
            d[k] = update(d.get(k, {}), v)
        else:
            d[k] = v
    return d

The bug shows up when the "update" has a k, v item where v is a dict and k is not originally a key in the dictionary being updated -- @FM's code "skips" this part of the update (because it performs it on an empty new dict which isn't saved or returned anywhere, just lost when the recursive call returns).

My other changes are minor: there is no reason for the if/else construct when .get does the same job faster and cleaner, and isinstance is best applied to abstract base classes (not concrete ones) for generality.

| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 7
    +1 Good catch on the bug -- doh! I figured someone would would have a better way to handle the isinstance test, but thought I'd take a stab at it. – FMc Jul 13 '10 at 2:58
  • 6
    Another minor "feature" causes this to raise TypeError: 'int' object does not support item assignment. when you, e.g. update({'k1': 1}, {'k1': {'k2': 2}}). To change this behavior, and instead expand the depth of dictionaries to make room for deeper dictionaries you can add an elif isinstance(d, Mapping): around the d[k] = u[k] and after the isinstance condition. You'll also need to add an else: d = {k: u[k]} to deal with the case that the updating dict is deeper than the original dict. Happy to edit the answer, but don't want to dirty concise code that solves the OP's problem. – hobs Dec 27 '12 at 1:10
  • 1
    Why use isinstance(v, collections.Mapping) rather than isinstance(v, dict)? In the event that OP decides to start using collections? – Matt Feb 8 '13 at 17:07
  • 2
    @Matt Yea, or any other mapping-derived object (lists of pairs of things). Makes the function more general and less likely to quietly ignore mapping-derived objects and leave them un-updated (insidious error that the OP might not ever see/catch). You almost always want to use Mapping to find dict types and basestring to find str types. – hobs Feb 8 '13 at 22:39
  • 2
    If you're running this under Python 3+ change u.iteritems() to u.items(), otherwise you will encounter: AttributeError: 'dict' object has no attribute 'iteritems' – Greg K Dec 30 '14 at 16:28
23

Took me a little bit on this one, but thanks to @Alex's post, he filled in the gap I was missing. However, I came across an issue if a value within the recursive dict happens to be a list, so I thought I'd share, and extend his answer.

import collections

def update(orig_dict, new_dict):
    for key, val in new_dict.iteritems():
        if isinstance(val, collections.Mapping):
            tmp = update(orig_dict.get(key, { }), val)
            orig_dict[key] = tmp
        elif isinstance(val, list):
            orig_dict[key] = (orig_dict.get(key, []) + val)
        else:
            orig_dict[key] = new_dict[key]
    return orig_dict
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 3
    I think this should probably be (to be a bit safer): orig_dict.get(key, []) + val. – Andy Hayden Oct 15 '14 at 6:31
  • 2
    Since dicts are mutable, you are changing the instance you are passing as argument. Then, you don't need to return orig_dict. – gabrielhpugliese Feb 27 '15 at 19:33
  • 3
    I think most people would expect the definition to return the updated dict even though it is updated in place. – Kel Solaar Jun 12 '15 at 20:56
  • The default logic in the onosendi's code is to append updated list to the original list. If you need to update overwrite the original list, you need to set orig_dict[key]=val – intijk Nov 1 '16 at 18:00
  • @gabrielhpugliese returning the original is needed if called with a dictionary literal, e.g. merged_tree = update({'default': {'initialvalue': 1}}, other_tree) – EoghanM Oct 17 '18 at 11:24
18

@Alex's answer is good, but doesn't work when replacing an element such as an integer with a dictionary, such as update({'foo':0},{'foo':{'bar':1}}). This update addresses it:

import collections
def update(d, u):
    for k, v in u.iteritems():
        if isinstance(d, collections.Mapping):
            if isinstance(v, collections.Mapping):
                r = update(d.get(k, {}), v)
                d[k] = r
            else:
                d[k] = u[k]
        else:
            d = {k: u[k]}
    return d

update({'k1': 1}, {'k1': {'k2': {'k3': 3}}})
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • I see. You made my elif check of the original object type an "enclosing" conditional containing the checks of both the value and the key of that dict/mapping. Clever. – hobs Sep 6 '15 at 19:14
  • This won't work if the inner dict has more than one key. – Wlerin Feb 25 '17 at 23:51
  • @Wlerin , it still works; d will have become a Mapping by that point. Here's a test case with multiple keys: update({'A1': 1, 'A2':2}, {'A1': {'B1': {'C1': 3, 'C2':4}, 'B2':2}, 'A3':5}). Do you have an example that doesn't do what you want? – bscan Feb 27 '17 at 15:59
  • Why test if isinstance(d, collections.Mapping) on evey iteration? See my answer. – Jérôme Feb 20 at 14:11
13

Same solution as the accepted one, but clearer variable naming, docstring, and fixed a bug where {} as a value would not override.

import collections


def deep_update(source, overrides):
    """
    Update a nested dictionary or similar mapping.
    Modify ``source`` in place.
    """
    for key, value in overrides.iteritems():
        if isinstance(value, collections.Mapping) and value:
            returned = deep_update(source.get(key, {}), value)
            source[key] = returned
        else:
            source[key] = overrides[key]
    return source

Here are a few test cases:

def test_deep_update():
    source = {'hello1': 1}
    overrides = {'hello2': 2}
    deep_update(source, overrides)
    assert source == {'hello1': 1, 'hello2': 2}

    source = {'hello': 'to_override'}
    overrides = {'hello': 'over'}
    deep_update(source, overrides)
    assert source == {'hello': 'over'}

    source = {'hello': {'value': 'to_override', 'no_change': 1}}
    overrides = {'hello': {'value': 'over'}}
    deep_update(source, overrides)
    assert source == {'hello': {'value': 'over', 'no_change': 1}}

    source = {'hello': {'value': 'to_override', 'no_change': 1}}
    overrides = {'hello': {'value': {}}}
    deep_update(source, overrides)
    assert source == {'hello': {'value': {}, 'no_change': 1}}

    source = {'hello': {'value': {}, 'no_change': 1}}
    overrides = {'hello': {'value': 2}}
    deep_update(source, overrides)
    assert source == {'hello': {'value': 2, 'no_change': 1}}

This functions is available in the charlatan package, in charlatan.utils.

| improve this answer | | | | |
7

Here's an Immutable version of recursive dictionary merge in case anybody needs it.

Based upon @Alex Martelli's answer.

Python 2.x:

import collections
from copy import deepcopy


def merge(dict1, dict2):
    ''' Return a new dictionary by merging two dictionaries recursively. '''

    result = deepcopy(dict1)

    for key, value in dict2.iteritems():
        if isinstance(value, collections.Mapping):
            result[key] = merge(result.get(key, {}), value)
        else:
            result[key] = deepcopy(dict2[key])

    return result

Python 3.x:

import collections
from copy import deepcopy


def merge(dict1, dict2):
    ''' Return a new dictionary by merging two dictionaries recursively. '''

    result = deepcopy(dict1)

    for key, value in dict2.items():
        if isinstance(value, collections.Mapping):
            result[key] = merge(result.get(key, {}), value)
        else:
            result[key] = deepcopy(dict2[key])

    return result
| improve this answer | | | | |
6

Minor improvements to @Alex's answer that enables updating of dictionaries of differing depths as well as limiting the depth that the update dives into the original nested dictionary (but the updating dictionary depth is not limited). Only a few cases have been tested:

def update(d, u, depth=-1):
    """
    Recursively merge or update dict-like objects. 
    >>> update({'k1': {'k2': 2}}, {'k1': {'k2': {'k3': 3}}, 'k4': 4})
    {'k1': {'k2': {'k3': 3}}, 'k4': 4}
    """

    for k, v in u.iteritems():
        if isinstance(v, Mapping) and not depth == 0:
            r = update(d.get(k, {}), v, depth=max(depth - 1, -1))
            d[k] = r
        elif isinstance(d, Mapping):
            d[k] = u[k]
        else:
            d = {k: u[k]}
    return d
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 1
    Thanks for this! What use-case might the depth parameter apply to? – Matt Feb 8 '13 at 17:54
  • @Matt when you have some objects/dicts at a known depth that you don't want merged/updated, just overwritten with new objects (like replacing a dict with a string or float or whatever, deep in your dict) – hobs Feb 8 '13 at 22:30
  • 1
    This only works if the update is at most 1 level deeper than the original. For example, this fails: update({'k1': 1}, {'k1': {'k2': {'k3': 3}}}) I added an answer that addresses this – bscan Sep 2 '15 at 15:32
  • @bscan good catch! never thought of that use case. I guess I should recurse deeper in the elif branches. Any ideas? – hobs Sep 3 '15 at 18:29
  • Why test if isinstance(d, Mapping) on evey iteration? See my answer. (Also, I'm not sure about your d = {k: u[k]}) – Jérôme Feb 20 at 14:13
3

This question is old, but I landed here when searching for a "deep merge" solution. The answers above inspired what follows. I ended up writing my own because there were bugs in all the versions I tested. The critical point missed was, at some arbitrary depth of the two input dicts, for some key, k, the decision tree when d[k] or u[k] is not a dict was faulty.

Also, this solution does not require recursion, which is more symmetric with how dict.update() works, and returns None.

import collections
def deep_merge(d, u):
   """Do a deep merge of one dict into another.

   This will update d with values in u, but will not delete keys in d
   not found in u at some arbitrary depth of d. That is, u is deeply
   merged into d.

   Args -
     d, u: dicts

   Note: this is destructive to d, but not u.

   Returns: None
   """
   stack = [(d,u)]
   while stack:
      d,u = stack.pop(0)
      for k,v in u.items():
         if not isinstance(v, collections.Mapping):
            # u[k] is not a dict, nothing to merge, so just set it,
            # regardless if d[k] *was* a dict
            d[k] = v
         else:
            # note: u[k] is a dict

            # get d[k], defaulting to a dict, if it doesn't previously
            # exist
            dv = d.setdefault(k, {})

            if not isinstance(dv, collections.Mapping):
               # d[k] is not a dict, so just set it to u[k],
               # overriding whatever it was
               d[k] = v
            else:
               # both d[k] and u[k] are dicts, push them on the stack
               # to merge
               stack.append((dv, v))
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3

Just use python-benedict (I did it), it has a merge (deepupdate) utility method and many others. It works with python 2 / python 3 and it is well tested.

from benedict import benedict

dictionary1=benedict({'level1':{'level2':{'levelA':0,'levelB':1}}})
update={'level1':{'level2':{'levelB':10}}}
dictionary1.merge(update)
print(dictionary1)
# >> {'level1':{'level2':{'levelA':0,'levelB':10}}}

Installation: pip install python-benedict

Documentation: https://github.com/fabiocaccamo/python-benedict

| improve this answer | | | | |
2

In neither of these answers the authors seem to understand the concept of updating an object stored in a dictionary nor even of iterating over dictionary items (as opposed to keys). So I had to write one which doesn't make pointless tautological dictionary stores and retrievals. The dicts are assumed to store other dicts or simple types.

def update_nested_dict(d, other):
    for k, v in other.items():
        if isinstance(v, collections.Mapping):
            d_v = d.get(k)
            if isinstance(d_v, collections.Mapping):
                update_nested_dict(d_v, v)
            else:
                d[k] = v.copy()
        else:
            d[k] = v

Or even simpler one working with any type:

def update_nested_dict(d, other):
    for k, v in other.items():
        d_v = d.get(k)
        if isinstance(v, collections.Mapping) and isinstance(d_v, collections.Mapping):
            update_nested_dict(d_v, v)
        else:
            d[k] = deepcopy(v) # or d[k] = v if you know what you're doing
| improve this answer | | | | |
2

Update to @Alex Martelli's answer to fix a bug in his code to make the solution more robust:

def update_dict(d, u):
    for k, v in u.items():
        if isinstance(v, collections.Mapping):
            default = v.copy()
            default.clear()
            r = update_dict(d.get(k, default), v)
            d[k] = r
        else:
            d[k] = v
    return d

The key is that we often want to create the same type at recursion, so here we use v.copy().clear() but not {}. And this is especially useful if the dict here is of type collections.defaultdict which can have different kinds of default_factorys.

Also notice that the u.iteritems() has been changed to u.items() in Python3.

| improve this answer | | | | |
2

I used the solution @Alex Martelli suggests, but it fails

TypeError 'bool' object does not support item assignment

when the two dictionaries differ in data type at some level.

In case at the same level the element of dictionary d is just a scalar (ie. Bool) while the element of dictionary u is still dictionary the reassignment fails as no dictionary assignment is possible into scalar (like True[k]).

One added condition fixes that:

from collections import Mapping

def update_deep(d, u):
    for k, v in u.items():
        # this condition handles the problem
        if not isinstance(d, Mapping):
            d = u
        elif isinstance(v, Mapping):
            r = update_deep(d.get(k, {}), v)
            d[k] = r
        else:
            d[k] = u[k]

    return d
| improve this answer | | | | |
2

The code below should solve the update({'k1': 1}, {'k1': {'k2': 2}}) issue in @Alex Martelli's answer the right way.

def deepupdate(original, update):
    """Recursively update a dict.

    Subdict's won't be overwritten but also updated.
    """
    if not isinstance(original, abc.Mapping):
        return update
    for key, value in update.items():
        if isinstance(value, abc.Mapping):
            original[key] = deepupdate(original.get(key, {}), value)
        else:
            original[key] = value
    return original
| improve this answer | | | | |
1
def update(value, nvalue):
    if not isinstance(value, dict) or not isinstance(nvalue, dict):
        return nvalue
    for k, v in nvalue.items():
        value.setdefault(k, dict())
        if isinstance(v, dict):
            v = update(value[k], v)
        value[k] = v
    return value

use dict or collections.Mapping

| improve this answer | | | | |
1

I know this question is pretty old, but still posting what I do when I have to update a nested dictionary. We can use the fact that dicts are passed by reference in python Assuming that the path of the key is known and is dot separated. Forex if we have a dict named data:

{
"log_config_worker": {
    "version": 1, 
    "root": {
        "handlers": [
            "queue"
        ], 
        "level": "DEBUG"
    }, 
    "disable_existing_loggers": true, 
    "handlers": {
        "queue": {
            "queue": null, 
            "class": "myclass1.QueueHandler"
        }
    }
}, 
"number_of_archived_logs": 15, 
"log_max_size": "300M", 
"cron_job_dir": "/etc/cron.hourly/", 
"logs_dir": "/var/log/patternex/", 
"log_rotate_dir": "/etc/logrotate.d/"
}

And we want to update the queue class, the path of the key would be - log_config_worker.handlers.queue.class

We can use the following function to update the value:

def get_updated_dict(obj, path, value):
    key_list = path.split(".")

    for k in key_list[:-1]:
        obj = obj[k]

    obj[key_list[-1]] = value

get_updated_dict(data, "log_config_worker.handlers.queue.class", "myclass2.QueueHandler")

This would update the dictionary correctly.

| improve this answer | | | | |
1

It could be that you stumble over a non-standard-dictionary, like me today, which has no iteritems-Attribute. In this case it's easy to interpret this type of dictionary as a standard-dictionary. E.g.: Python 2.7:

    import collections
    def update(orig_dict, new_dict):
        for key, val in dict(new_dict).iteritems():
            if isinstance(val, collections.Mapping):
                tmp = update(orig_dict.get(key, { }), val)
                orig_dict[key] = tmp
            elif isinstance(val, list):
                orig_dict[key] = (orig_dict[key] + val)
            else:
                orig_dict[key] = new_dict[key]
        return orig_dict

    import multiprocessing
    d=multiprocessing.Manager().dict({'sample':'data'})
    u={'other': 1234}

    x=update(d, u)
    x.items()

Python 3.8:

    def update(orig_dict, new_dict):
        orig_dict=dict(orig_dict)
        for key, val in dict(new_dict).items():
            if isinstance(val, collections.abc.Mapping):
                tmp = update(orig_dict.get(key, { }), val)
                orig_dict[key] = tmp
            elif isinstance(val, list):
                orig_dict[key] = (orig_dict[key] + val)
            else:
                orig_dict[key] = new_dict[key]
        return orig_dict

    import collections
    import multiprocessing
    d=multiprocessing.Manager().dict({'sample':'data'})
    u={'other': 1234, "deeper": {'very': 'deep'}}

    x=update(d, u)
    x.items()
| improve this answer | | | | |
0

Yes! And another solution. My solution differs in the keys that are being checked. In all other solutions we only look at the keys in dict_b. But here we look in the union of both dictionaries.

Do with it as you please

def update_nested(dict_a, dict_b):
    set_keys = set(dict_a.keys()).union(set(dict_b.keys()))
    for k in set_keys:
        v = dict_a.get(k)
        if isinstance(v, dict):
            new_dict = dict_b.get(k, None)
            if new_dict:
                update_nested(v, new_dict)
        else:
            new_value = dict_b.get(k, None)
            if new_value:
                dict_a[k] = new_value
| improve this answer | | | | |
0

If you want to replace a "full nested dictionary with arrays" you can use this snippet :

It will replace any "old_value" by "new_value". It's roughly doing a depth-first rebuilding of the dictionary. It can even work with List or Str/int given as input parameter of first level.

def update_values_dict(original_dict, future_dict, old_value, new_value):
    # Recursively updates values of a nested dict by performing recursive calls

    if isinstance(original_dict, Dict):
        # It's a dict
        tmp_dict = {}
        for key, value in original_dict.items():
            tmp_dict[key] = update_values_dict(value, future_dict, old_value, new_value)
        return tmp_dict
    elif isinstance(original_dict, List):
        # It's a List
        tmp_list = []
        for i in original_dict:
            tmp_list.append(update_values_dict(i, future_dict, old_value, new_value))
        return tmp_list
    else:
        # It's not a dict, maybe a int, a string, etc.
        return original_dict if original_dict != old_value else new_value
| improve this answer | | | | |
0

Another way of using recursion:

def updateDict(dict1,dict2):
    keys1 = list(dict1.keys())
    keys2= list(dict2.keys())
    keys2 = [x for x in keys2 if x in keys1]
    for x in keys2:
        if (x in keys1) & (type(dict1[x]) is dict) & (type(dict2[x]) is dict):
            updateDict(dict1[x],dict2[x])
        else:
            dict1.update({x:dict2[x]})
    return(dict1)
| improve this answer | | | | |
0

a new Q how to By a keys chain

dictionary1={'level1':{'level2':{'levelA':0,'levelB':1}},'anotherLevel1':{'anotherLevel2':{'anotherLevelA':0,'anotherLevelB':1}}}
update={'anotherLevel1':{'anotherLevel2':1014}}
dictionary1.update(update)
print dictionary1
{'level1':{'level2':{'levelA':0,'levelB':1}},'anotherLevel1':{'anotherLevel2':1014}}
| improve this answer | | | | |
0

you could try this, it works with lists and is pure:

def update_keys(newd, dic, mapping):
  def upsingle(d,k,v):
    if k in mapping:
      d[mapping[k]] = v
    else:
      d[k] = v
  for ekey, evalue in dic.items():
    upsingle(newd, ekey, evalue)
    if type(evalue) is dict:
      update_keys(newd, evalue, mapping)
    if type(evalue) is list:
      upsingle(newd, ekey, [update_keys({}, i, mapping) for i in evalue])
  return newd
| improve this answer | | | | |
0

I recommend to replace {} by type(v)() in order to propagate object type of any dict subclass stored in u but absent from d. For example, this would preserve types such as collections.OrderedDict:

Python 2:

import collections

def update(d, u):
    for k, v in u.iteritems():
        if isinstance(v, collections.Mapping):
            d[k] = update(d.get(k, type(v)()), v)
        else:
            d[k] = v
    return d

Python 3:

import collections.abc

def update(d, u):
    for k, v in u.items():
        if isinstance(v, collections.abc.Mapping):
            d[k] = update(d.get(k, type(v)()), v)
        else:
            d[k] = v
    return d
| improve this answer | | | | |
-1

That's a bit to the side but do you really need nested dictionaries? Depending on the problem, sometimes flat dictionary may suffice... and look good at it:

>>> dict1 = {('level1','level2','levelA'): 0}
>>> dict1['level1','level2','levelB'] = 1
>>> update = {('level1','level2','levelB'): 10}
>>> dict1.update(update)
>>> print dict1
{('level1', 'level2', 'levelB'): 10, ('level1', 'level2', 'levelA'): 0}
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 5
    The nested structure comes from incoming json datasets, so I would like to keep them intact,... – jay_t Jul 13 '10 at 7:57
-1

If you want a one-liner:

{**dictionary1, **{'level1':{**dictionary1['level1'], **{'level2':{**dictionary1['level1']['level2'], **{'levelB':10}}}}}}
| improve this answer | | | | |

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