3

According to TypeScript docs, extending an already existing Interface is as easy as redeclaring it with new properties, and then provide implementation for those. I've used to this technique to add static method extensions to native JavaScript objects a number of times. This however, doesn't work for member functions.

For example (TypeScript Playground link):

interface Number {
  toPowerOf10: () => string;
}

Number.prototype.toPowerOf10 = (): string => { 
  return this.toExponential();
}

var n: Number = 10000;
n.toPowerOf10();

The above code compiles fine, but at run time, it throws the following exception:

Uncaught TypeError: _this.toExponential is not a function

The culprit seems to be how TypeScript generates the JavaScript code for this scenario:

var _this = this;
Number.prototype.toPowerOf10 = function () {
    return _this.toExponential();
};
var n = 1000;
alert(n.toPowerOf10());

It's obvious _this doesn't have reference to the Number instance here. I'm not sure if I'm doing something wrong, or if extending native objects in this way isn't supported in TypeScript.

  • 1
    very interesting question! Using function () { instead of (): string => { solves the problem for me, does someone know the spec well? Is this desired behavior or a bug? – olydis Sep 1 '15 at 11:22
  • 1
    @olydis Using an arrow function will capture the outer scope, so this would be expected behavior. If however, you implemented your own Number class with implements Number, using an arrow would be fine. Assigning a function to the prototype is the way to go here – CodingIntrigue Sep 1 '15 at 11:23
  • Incidentally, adding functions to the prototype like this is bad practice. They may be overwritten in the future. – CodingIntrigue Sep 1 '15 at 11:27
11

It's because you use the arrow notation (=>) to declare the new function and not function. While => may seem like a nice shorthand for the same thing, it and function are not exactly equivalent. In particular, => will do lexical scoping, meaning that this outside of that function will refer to the same thing as this inside that function, which it accomplishes by capturing that local _this in the compiled JavaScript. Here, this is the global scope, as you declare that Number extension there. If this is a browser this will refer to the window object, which of course has no toExponential method.

To accomplish what you want, simply use the following:

interface Number {
  toPowerOf10: () => string;
}

Number.prototype.toPowerOf10 = function() : string {
  return this.toExponential();
}

var n: Number = 10000;
document.write(n.toPowerOf10());
  • 1
    just a small note: explicitly naming the type is still possible (function(): string {) – olydis Sep 1 '15 at 11:25
  • You're right, I'll add it. – JulianR Sep 1 '15 at 11:26
  • Also, assuming this is an actual representation of the problem, Number.prototype.toPowerOf10 = Number.prototype.toExponential; would be equivalent – CodingIntrigue Sep 1 '15 at 11:28
  • @JulianR Thanks. Worked perfectly. I wasn't aware that => had a slightly different meaning. You learn something new every day. @RGraham This was just a simplification to save space in the question :) – Uzair Sajid Sep 1 '15 at 11:35
  • 1
    This no longer seems to compile unless you add a declare global { around the interface definition – Ovidiu Dolha May 16 '18 at 12:22

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