3

I get this error when using python 2.7.10 or 2.7.9 but works with python 2.7.6 (haven't tested other versions)

OpenSLL version:

openssl version -a
OpenSSL 1.0.1f 6 Jan 2014
built on: Thu Jun 11 15:30:15 UTC 2015
platform: debian-amd64
options:  bn(64,64) rc4(16x,int) des(idx,cisc,16,int) blowfish(idx)
compiler: cc -fPIC -DOPENSSL_PIC -DOPENSSL_THREADS -D_REENTRANT -DDSO_DLFCN -DHAVE_DLFCN_H -m64 -DL_ENDIAN -DTERMIO -g -O2 -fstack-protector-strong -Wformat -Werror=format-security -D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=2 -Wl,-Bsymbolic-functions -Wl,-z,relro -Wa,--noexecstack -Wall -DMD32_REG_T=int -DOPENSSL_IA32_SSE2 -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_MONT -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_MONT5 -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_GF2m -DSHA1_ASM -DSHA256_ASM -DSHA512_ASM -DMD5_ASM -DAES_ASM -DVPAES_ASM -DBSAES_ASM -DWHIRLPOOL_ASM -DGHASH_ASM
OPENSSLDIR: "/usr/lib/ssl"

Python:

import ssl
print ssl.OPENSSL_VERSION_NUMBER
268439663L
print get_server_certificate(('someInternalIp', 443), ssl_version=ssl.PROTOCOL_SSLv23)

StackTrace:

File "C:\Python27\lib\ssl.py", line 985, in get_server_certificate
  with closing(context.wrap_socket(sock)) as sslsock:
File "C:\Python27\lib\ssl.py", line 352, in wrap_socket
  _context=self)
File "C:\Python27\lib\ssl.py", line 579, in __init__
  self.do_handshake()
File "C:\Python27\lib\ssl.py", line 808, in do_handshake
  self._sslobj.do_handshake()
ssl.SSLError: [SSL: UNSUPPORTED_PROTOCOL] unsupported protocol (_ssl.c:590)

4 Answers 4

6

If you run your requests in debian-based OS or docker image you need to change your SSL config. Debian by default works with SSL v1.2 + at the moment.

You can edit openssl.cnf manually if you want but there's a quicker solution:

sed -i 's/MinProtocol = TLSv1.2/MinProtocol = TLSv1.0/' /etc/ssl/openssl.cnf

It helped in my case, requests to URLs with old SSL now return nice 200 response.

3

Apparently python 2.7.6 used this cipher suite:

DEFAULT:!aNULL:!eNULL:!LOW:!EXPORT:!SSLv2

and now it uses:

# Disable weak or insecure ciphers by default
# (OpenSSL's default setting is 'DEFAULT:!aNULL:!eNULL')
# Enable a better set of ciphers by default
# This list has been explicitly chosen to:
#   * Prefer cipher suites that offer perfect forward secrecy (DHE/ECDHE)
#   * Prefer ECDHE over DHE for better performance
#   * Prefer any AES-GCM over any AES-CBC for better performance and security
#   * Then Use HIGH cipher suites as a fallback
#   * Then Use 3DES as fallback which is secure but slow
#   * Disable NULL authentication, NULL encryption, and MD5 MACs for security
#     reasons
_DEFAULT_CIPHERS = (
    'ECDH+AESGCM:DH+AESGCM:ECDH+AES256:DH+AES256:ECDH+AES128:DH+AES:ECDH+HIGH:'
    'DH+HIGH:ECDH+3DES:DH+3DES:RSA+AESGCM:RSA+AES:RSA+HIGH:RSA+3DES:!aNULL:'
    '!eNULL:!MD5'
)

I had to build the following code that informs me in case an old cipher suite was used. I could do this because I'm interested in retrieving the certificate

from socket import socket
from ssl import SSLContext
from ssl import PROTOCOL_SSLv23
from ssl import DER_cert_to_PEM_cert

WEAK_CTX = SSLContext(PROTOCOL_SSLv23)
WEAK_CTX.set_ciphers('ALL:!aNULL:!eNULL')

NORMAL_CTX = SSLContext(PROTOCOL_SSLv23)
NORMAL_CTX.set_ciphers(
    'ECDH+AESGCM:DH+AESGCM:ECDH+AES256:DH+AES256:ECDH+AES128:DH+AES:ECDH+HIGH:'
    'DH+HIGH:ECDH+3DES:DH+3DES:RSA+AESGCM:RSA+AES:RSA+HIGH:RSA+3DES:!aNULL:'
    '!eNULL:!MD5'
)

def getCertificate(addr):
    sock = socket()
    sock.connect(addr)
    isWeakCipher = False
    try:
        sslobj = NORMAL_CTX._wrap_socket(sock._sock, server_side=False)
        sslobj.do_handshake()
    except Exception as ex:
        if hasattr(ex, 'reason') and ex.reason == 'SSLV3_ALERT_HANDSHAKE_FAILURE':
            sock.close()
            sock = socket()
            sock.connect(addr)
            sslobj = WEAK_CTX._wrap_socket(sock._sock, server_side=False)
            sslobj.do_handshake()
            isWeakCipher = True
        else:
            raise
    cipher = sslobj.cipher()

    cert = sslobj.peer_certificate(True)
    sock.close()
    return isWeakCipher, cipher, cert 
4
  • 3
    Can someone please explain this answer further? What do I do when I get that error?
    – Yathi
    Sep 15, 2016 at 15:16
  • 1
    In most cases, what you want is to change the settings on the target machine. Most likely it's using an older protocol version. The code above tries to "get in regardless" which is not something you should do in a normal production situation. Try to set your target machine to use TLS. Preferably 1.2 as this is currently the latest. Sep 17, 2016 at 6:45
  • Saved my day. I can confirm the setting ciphers is mandatory in order to use SSLv3 connection.
    – Khamidulla
    May 25, 2017 at 6:56
  • In my case I had to use ssl.PROTOCOL_TLSv1 to force the use of TLS v1.0. I'm not sure what's going on, as the description for PROTOCOL_TLS (synonym for PROTOCOL_SSLv23) says it should automatically choose a compatible option: docs.python.org/3/library/ssl.html#ssl.PROTOCOL_TLS
    – jtpereyda
    Feb 2, 2019 at 19:10
0

Probably your server is exposing an old, insecure version of the TLS protocol, which modern OpenSSLs are configured not to allow.

https://stackoverflow.com/a/53065682/6214034 might help.

0

This is how I solved it using python 3.8 on Ubuntu 20.04.

import ssl
import socket

def get_ssl_data(self, host, port=443):
    context = ssl.create_default_context()
    context.set_ciphers('ALL:@SECLEVEL=1') # this magic line allows us to connect with anything under the sun!!! It took me 3 hours to find it.

    with socket.socket(socket.AF_INET) as sock:
        with context.wrap_socket( sock, server_hostname=host ) as conn:
            conn.settimeout(3.0)
            conn.connect((host, port))
            ssl_info = conn.getpeercert()
            # print(json.dumps(ssl_info, indent=2, sort_keys=True))
            return ssl_info

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.