2

I am writing a winform program to test the C# concurrent dictionary with below class:

public class Class1
{
    public int X = 10;

    public Class1(int x)
    {
        X = x;
        Debug.WriteLine("Class1 Created");
    }
}

and below button code:

  private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var dict = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, Class1>();

        Func<Class1> valueFactory = () => 
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("Factory Called");
            return new Class1(5);
        };

        var temp = dict.GetOrAdd(1, valueFactory());
        Debug.WriteLine(temp.X);
        temp.X = 20;

        var temp2 = dict.GetOrAdd(1, valueFactory());
        Debug.WriteLine(temp2.X);
    }

I have noticed that the valueFactory method has always been executed and Class1 constructor been called twice even the key already exists in dict after the first GetorAdd method.

However, if I change the Func definition to

Func<int, Class1> valueFactory = (k) => 
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("Factory Called");
            return new Class1(5);
        };

and call the GetorAdd method like below:

var temp = dict.GetOrAdd(1, valueFactory);

The program works in the desired way as it did not call Class1 constructor in the second call. I suspect it is because I passed a delegate valueFactory instead of function call valueFactory() to the GetorAdd method. I wonder if there is a detail explanation in what is happening under the hood and I also don't understand why I can't not pass in valueFactory as delegate if my Func definition is anything other than Func<int, Class1(the same definition as the dictionary)

Thank you.

2

When you do:

var temp = dict.GetOrAdd(1, valueFactory());
...
var temp2 = dict.GetOrAdd(1, valueFactory());

You are actually invoking valueFactory before calling dict.GetOrAdd(). So it's normal that it gets called every time. Sure, the new instance of Class1 returned by the 2nd invocation to valueFactory() is ultimately not useful, but it got created nonetheless.

In contrast, when you do:

var temp = dict.GetOrAdd(1, valueFactory);
...
var temp2 = dict.GetOrAdd(1, valueFactory);

... you are actually using a different overload of the method GetOrAdd, where you pass a reference to the delegate valueFactory without invoking it yourself. The GetOrAdd() method then decides if it needs to invoke valueFactory or not based on whether the key is found in the dictionary.

ConcurrentDictionary.GetOrAdd Method (TKey, Func) doc:

Adds a key/value pair to the ConcurrentDictionary<TKey, TValue> by using the specified function, if the key does not already exist.

In this case, it doesn't need to invoke it a 2nd time, because it finds the key the 2nd time you call GetOrAdd().


However, please note that passing in the valueFactory as a delegate to GetOrAdd doesn't guarantee that it won't get called twice. This is especially true in multi-threaded scenarios. Notice what the documentation on ConcurrentDictionary.GetOrAdd Method (TKey, Func) also says about this:

If you call GetOrAdd simultaneously on different threads, addValueFactory may be called multiple times, but its key/value pair might not be added to the dictionary for every call.

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