7

I find it weird and was wondering if it is something that is regularly used. When can it be useful?

public interface InterA { 
   Object getInfo() throws Exception1; 
}
public interface InterB {
   public default Integer getInfo(Object s) {return 67;} 
}

public interface InterC extends InterA, InterB {
   @Override public abstract Integer getInfo(Object s);
}
3
  • 1
    You could test if this compiles using javac... Sep 1 '15 at 17:22
  • 1
    @LuiggiMendoza I did, it compiles. Is it regulary used, when is it useful?
    – Stanko
    Sep 1 '15 at 17:23
  • Then your question should not be if this is allowed. You're asking for use cases to use this design. I recommend you to edit the question, otherwise the answer would be: yes, it's allowed. Sep 1 '15 at 17:25
3

This exists before default interface methods. For example, an abstract class can make

    @Override
    abstract public int hashCode();

forcing subclasses to provide implementations for hashCode, possibly because of additional requirements imposed by the abstract class.

1

Of course you are allowed to do that. The name itself telling that it's abstract. You are allowed to do that where as the implemented class of that abstract class must override that method.

When you decide to be an abstract, you need not to implement.

1
  • So the class that implements InterC, lets say InterD, must give an implementation of the method? Let's then say that we have a InterE that implements InterD, can InterE make the method abstract again?
    – Stanko
    Sep 1 '15 at 17:26

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