10

This question is related to Steven’s answer - here. He proposed a very good logger wrapper. I will paste his code below:

public interface ILogger
{
    void Log(LogEntry entry);
}

public static class LoggerExtensions
{
    public static void Log(this ILogger logger, string message)
    {
        logger.Log(new LogEntry(LoggingEventType.Information,
            message, null));
    }

    public static void Log(this ILogger logger, Exception exception)
    {
        logger.Log(new LogEntry(LoggingEventType.Error, 
            exception.Message, exception));
    }

    // More methods here.
}

So, my question is what is the proper way to create implementation that proxies to log4net? Should I just add another Log extension method with type parameter and then create a switch inside? Use different log4net method in case of LoggingEventType ?

And second question, what is the best way to use it later in the code?

Because he wrote:

(…) you can easily create an ILogger implementation (…) and configure your DI container to inject it in classes that have a ILogger in their constructor.

Does that mean that every class that will log sth (so basically every), should have ILogger in its constructor?

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  • 1
    "Does that mean that every class that will log sth (so basically every)". If every class uses a logger, you are seriously logging way too much.
    – Steven
    Sep 2, 2015 at 10:09
  • 1
    @Steven contrary to the upvotes and comments on that answer, I thoroughly disagree: you can never log too much. Especially with web services and Windows Services (i.e. backends), where there is little to no error reporting to a user facing a UI, logging is invaluable to troubleshooting issues. Sure, you can say "This code is SOLID", but if that code cannot be "post mortem debugged" by simply reading the log to analyze what the application was doing when it crashed, then what does SOLID bring you? Sure, there's unit tests to prevent issues, but code is never flawless.
    – CodeCaster
    Sep 2, 2015 at 13:20
  • 2
    @CodeCaster: The method I'm proposing in my answer is actually a form of AOP. If you define the right abstractions in your systems (which is what my answer is about), you'll find it easy to apply a few decorators that do logging for you. Mix this with Clean Code and and fail fast using exceptions, and you'll find that calls like logger.Log("now we're in this if-branch") and logger.Log("customer is null") become actually quite rare.
    – Steven
    Sep 2, 2015 at 13:39
  • 3
    It’s a design thing. A controlled set of abstractions and reduced cyclomatic complexity. All runtime data is either an input parameter or some form of stateful data being pulled from storage (database, memory etc.), all of which can be logged using aspects/decorators. Having details of the data and the sequence of method calls as the data moves through the object graph can often be enough to figure out what is going on without polluting whole swathes of the code with the same repeating line of code over and over again x.Log("x was here");. Like I said, it’s a design thing.
    – qujck
    Sep 2, 2015 at 18:41
  • 3
    @TimLaax: Making that logger a singleton / ambient context, doesn't change the fact that it is a dependency; but it does make the dependency hidden. This makes it hard to test, mock, replace,decorate and intercept, hides the fact for any consumer that this dependency exist, and makes it impossible for the a tool (such as your DI library) to analyze the object graph for you. In my book, making the logger a singleton is absolutely not better nor cleaner. Making it a singleton is treatment of symptoms. You are injecting the logger in way too many classes: stop doing that.
    – Steven
    Sep 2, 2015 at 19:46

1 Answer 1

14

So, my question is what is the proper way to create implementation that proxies to log4net?

you should create something like:

public class Log4netAdapter : ILogger
{
    private readonly log4net.ILog m_Adaptee;

    public Log4netAdapter(log4net.ILog adaptee)
    {
        m_Adaptee = adaptee;
    }

    public void Log(LogEntry entry)
    {
        //Here invoke m_Adaptee
        if(entry.Severity == LoggingEventType.Debug)
            m_Adaptee.Debug(entry.Message, entry.Exception);
        else if(entry.Severity == LoggingEventType.Information)
            m_Adaptee.Info(entry.Message, entry.Exception);
        else if(entry.Severity == LoggingEventType.Warning)
            m_Adaptee.Warn(entry.Message, entry.Exception);
        else if(entry.Severity == LoggingEventType.Error)
            m_Adaptee.Error(entry.Message, entry.Exception);
        else
            m_Adaptee.Fatal(entry.Message, entry.Exception);
    }
}

Does that mean that every class that will log sth (so basically every), should have ILogger in its constructor?

As I understand from Stevens answer: Yes, you should do this.

what is the best way to use it later in the code?

If you are using a DI container, then just use the DI container to map ILogger to Log4netAdapter. You also need to register log4net.ILog, or just give an instance of log4net logger to the DI container to inject it to the Log4netAdapter constructor.

If you don't use a DI container, i.e., you use Pure DI, then you do something like this:

ILog log = log4net.LogManager.GetLogger("MyClass");

ILogger logging_adapter = new Log4netAdapter(log);

var myobject = new MyClass(other_dependencies_here, logging_adapter);
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    I have nothing much to add here (+1 for me), except as like I said in the comment that if you are injecting ILogger into almost all components in your system you are either logging too much or you are violating the SOLID principles.
    – Steven
    Sep 2, 2015 at 12:52
  • 1
    @TimLaax: That's hard to advice. I can point you to my articles (here, here and here) about applying a design that allows you to apply cross-cutting concerns (such as logging) with ease, and you can look at this example project to get a small working example, but I'm not aware of ready-to-use sample projects that show logging specifically.
    – Steven
    Sep 3, 2015 at 11:17
  • 1
    @Steven, why would the adapter accept an ILog at its constructor, and not instantiate a Log4Net object directly? Is that to allow testing the adapter? Jun 27, 2017 at 8:37
  • 1
    Nevermind I found an example written by @Steven and it can be found here: stackoverflow.com/a/25113659/3311255
    – Krptodr
    Dec 31, 2019 at 20:44
  • 1
    @Krptodr please post a new question here on SO with a full example and details and tag it with simple-injector. I will have a look after my hangover is gone :)
    – Steven
    Dec 31, 2019 at 23:20

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