7

When you override methods you are not allowed to reduce the visibility of the inherited method. According to the following table, protected is more accessible than no modifier:

            | Class | Package | Subclass | World
————————————+———————+—————————+——————————+———————
public      |  y    |    y    |    y     |   y
————————————+———————+—————————+——————————+———————
protected   |  y    |    y    |    y     |   n
————————————+———————+—————————+——————————+———————
no modifier |  y    |    y    |    n     |   n
————————————+———————+—————————+——————————+———————
private     |  y    |    n    |    n     |   n

y: accessible
n: not accessible

But when I try to override f() (see SubClass) then I get the error:

Cannot reduce the visibility of the inherited method from MyInterface.

The method in MyInterface has no access modifier and the one in SubClass is protected, so more accessible. What am I missing here?

public interface MyInterface {
  void f();
}

public abstract class MyClass {
  protected abstract void f();
}

public class SubClass extends MyClass implements MyInterface{
   protected void f() { }
}
  • 5
    You don't override interface methods. You implement them. – T.J. Crowder Sep 2 '15 at 5:24
  • @T.J.Crowder - jls jargon - an instance method mC declared in class C, overrides another method mI declared in a superinterface, iff ... – ZhongYu Sep 2 '15 at 5:36
  • @bayou.io: Interesting, I have never heard it put that way. – T.J. Crowder Sep 2 '15 at 7:03
13

Methods in interfaces implicitly have the access modifier of public. So when you implement it with protected, it is a weaker access modifier.

  • @T.J.Crowder That's a bit of a nitpick since you still use @Override when you implement them. – ajb Sep 2 '15 at 5:26
  • @Amila Is this only for interfaces or are there any other cases where no modifier = public ? – Stanko Sep 2 '15 at 5:27
  • 1
    @Dongo Only in interfaces, as far as I know – Amila Sep 2 '15 at 5:29
  • @ajb: Do you? Oh, hey, look, as of Java 1.6 (so, some years back), you do: bugs.java.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=5008260 – T.J. Crowder Sep 2 '15 at 7:05
  • 1
    @Amila: I was referring to the question rather than your answer, just for clarity. (In fact, I wrote that comment before you added your second sentence.) No criticism intended at all. :-) – T.J. Crowder Sep 2 '15 at 7:06
3

Methods in interfaces are implicitly marked public and not default

1

From Java doc:

The access modifier (§6.6) of an overriding or hiding method must provide at least as much access as the overridden or hidden method, as follows:

  1. If the overridden or hidden method is public, then the overriding or hiding method must be public; otherwise, a compile-time error occurs.
  2. If the overridden or hidden method is protected, then the overriding or hiding method must be protected or public; otherwise, a compile-time error occurs.
  3. If the overridden or hidden method has default (package) access, then the overriding or hiding method must not be private; otherwise, a compile-time error occurs.

The methods in an interface are by default public. So you cannot override/hide this method using any modifier other than public.

0

On a learner scale in java, it's a good question. But you have to remember that, there are default and implicit access modifiers , like interface in this case that is implicitly public by default.

public interface MyInterface {
  void f();
}

and

public interface MyInterface {
  public void f();
} 

both are same implicitly. Interfaces are designed in such a way that their behavior is exposed publicly.

0

In java Interface, all the methods are public. all the variables are public static final.(constants)

0

Interface methods are born with public

Give

protected void f(); 

Or

private void f();

In MyInterface and see what you get.

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