38

Say I would like to generate a secure random int between 0 and 27 using:

func Int(rand io.Reader, max *big.Int) (n *big.Int, err error)

in the "crypto/rand" package.

How would I do that?

I do not really understand how this works, why does it not return one of the built in Go ints instead of pointer to some big.Int type?

EDIT:

Would this be considered secure enough for tokens?

func getToken(length int) string {
    token := ""
    codeAlphabet := "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
    codeAlphabet += "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
    codeAlphabet += "0123456789"

    for i := 0; i < length; i++ {
        token += string(codeAlphabet[cryptoRandSecure(int64(len(codeAlphabet)))])
    }
    return token
}

func cryptoRandSecure(max int64) int64 {
    nBig, err := rand.Int(rand.Reader, big.NewInt(max))
    if err != nil {
        log.Println(err)
    }
    return nBig.Int64()
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(getToken(32))
}

This would output something like this:

qZDbuPwNQGrgVmZCU9A7FUWbp8eIfn0Z

EwZVoQ5D5SEfdhiRsDfH6dU6tAovILCZ

cOqzODVP0GwbiNBwtmqLA78rFgV9d3VT
5
  • 3
    Do you really need a "cryptographically secure pseudorandom number" ? (from the doc godoc.org/crypto/rand) If you do not, you can use godoc.org/math/rand
    – HectorJ
    Sep 2, 2015 at 9:53
  • 1
    I need it to generate secure tokens. Like the one I showed above. I would like it if it could include all characters from the alphabet including digits.
    – Aiden
    Sep 2, 2015 at 9:57
  • Just saw your edit. An alternate way could be to generate a really big random int (like between 0 and the max int64) and to encode it in hexadecimal or base32. I'll add it to my answer
    – HectorJ
    Sep 2, 2015 at 10:12
  • 2
    Normally if someone needs a cryptographically strong random number she won't need a range of [0,27] (which is 5 bit) but something much larger, more like 2048 bits which just does not fit into an int64. So a big.int is returned. Maybe you should generate a long bit sequence and simply base32 encode it?
    – Volker
    Sep 2, 2015 at 10:17
  • 3
    "Cryptographically secure PRNG" and "5 bits" does not go together. At a minimum a token (say, for CSRF or session IDs) should be 256 bits. I would rethink your approach.
    – elithrar
    Sep 2, 2015 at 10:53

3 Answers 3

43

Here is some working code :

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "crypto/rand"
    "math/big"
)

func main() {
    nBig, err := rand.Int(rand.Reader, big.NewInt(27))
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    n := nBig.Int64()
    fmt.Printf("Here is a random %T in [0,27) : %d\n", n, n)
}

But to generate a random token, I'd do something like this :

package main

import (
    "crypto/rand"
    "encoding/base32"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    token := getToken(10)
    fmt.Println("Here is a random token : ", token)
}

func getToken(length int) string {
    randomBytes := make([]byte, 32)
    _, err := rand.Read(randomBytes)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    return base32.StdEncoding.EncodeToString(randomBytes)[:length]
}
3
  • Also see socketloop.com/tutorials/golang-how-to-generate-random-string (using base64, so more than just the alphabet and numbers en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Base64)
    – HectorJ
    Sep 2, 2015 at 10:29
  • 2
    I'd suggest at least 24 (if not 32) bytes for any kind of tokens.
    – elithrar
    Sep 2, 2015 at 10:55
  • 1
    the getToken function, as currently written, only works if length is <= 56. Changing the first line in the function to randomBytes := make([]byte, length) will work for any value of length. Under the covers it will create a longer byte slice than needed but not that much more. The resulting random string will always be length long. Jun 2 at 22:13
30

If you're generating secure tokens for session IDs, OAuth Bearer tokens, CSRF or similar: you want to generate a token of (ideally) 256 bits (32 bytes) or no less than 192 bits (24 bytes).

A token with values between (0-27) can be brute-forced in less than a second and could not be considered secure.

e.g.

package main

import (
    "crypto/rand"
    "encoding/base64"
)

// GenerateRandomBytes returns securely generated random bytes.
// It will return an error if the system's secure random
// number generator fails to function correctly, in which
// case the caller should not continue.
func GenerateRandomBytes(n int) ([]byte, error) {
    b := make([]byte, n)
    _, err := rand.Read(b)
    // Note that err == nil only if we read len(b) bytes.
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }

    return b, nil
}

// GenerateRandomString returns a URL-safe, base64 encoded
// securely generated random string.
func GenerateRandomString(s int) (string, error) {
    b, err := GenerateRandomBytes(s)
    return base64.URLEncoding.EncodeToString(b), err
}

func main() {
    // Example: this will give us a 44 byte, base64 encoded output
    token, err := GenerateRandomString(32)
    if err != nil {
        // Serve an appropriately vague error to the
        // user, but log the details internally.
    }
}

The base64 output is safe for headers, HTTP forms, JSON bodies, etc.

If you need an integer it may help to explain your use-case, as it would be odd for a system to require tokens as ints.

2
  • Hi elithrar, I edited my posts. I wanted to use it to create tokens for different things such as password resets and for keys to be dealt out to people for registration for a closed website and so on.
    – Aiden
    Sep 2, 2015 at 23:57
  • 2
    @Aiden In that case you don't need random integers. A sufficiently random string (base64, hex, whatever) would be more than fine. My snippet above uses base64.URLEncoding to generate strings you can use in a URL - e.g. yourdomain.com/resetpassword?token=YW55m5hbCIGNhcm5hbCBwbGVhc3U= would cover that use-case. As a tip: make sure you strictly enforce a single-use and expiry date on the tokens in your backend (SQL, Redis, etc.) as there are lots of sharp edges around re-using password reset tokens that don't expire "correctly".
    – elithrar
    Sep 3, 2015 at 2:16
2

If you only need a small number (i.e. [0, 255]), you could just read a byte out of the package's Reader:

b := []byte{0}
if _, err := rand.Reader.Read(b); err != nil {
    panic(err)
}
n := b[0]
fmt.Println(n)

Playground: http://play.golang.org/p/4VO52LiEVh (the example won't work there, I don't know if it's working as intended or it's a playground bug).

1

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