21

The following code:

List<Interval> intervals = new List<Interval>();
List<int> points = new List<int>();

//Initialization of the two lists
// [...]

foreach (var point in points)
{
    intervals.RemoveAll (x => x.Intersects (point));
}

is at least 100x faster than this when the lists are of size ~10000:

List<Interval> intervals = new List<Interval>();
List<int> points = new List<int>();

//Initialization of the two lists
// [...]

foreach (var point in points)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < intervals.Count;)
    {
        if (intervals[i].Intersects(point))
        {
            intervals.Remove(intervals[i]);
        }
        else
        {
            i++;
        }
    }
}

How is it possible? What is performed under the hood with "RemoveAll"? According to MSDN, "RemoveAll" performs a linear search and is therefore in O(n). So I would expect similar performance for both.

When replacing "Remove" by "RemoveAt", the iteration is much faster, comparable to "RemoveAll". But both "Remove" and "RemoveAt" have O(n) complexity, so why is the performance difference between them so big? Could it only be due to the fact that "Remove (item)" compares the list elements with "item" and "RemoveAt" doesn't perform any comparison?

11
  • 19
    RemoveAll does not use LINQ, it is a standard method on List<T>. This is noted by the fact that RemoveAll modifies the collection in place - LINQ does not modify collections.
    – Dan
    Sep 2, 2015 at 11:10
  • 7
    @Brainless, you can speed up 2nd code sample, if use intervals.RemoveAt(i); instead of intervals.Remove (intervals[i]);, I think.
    – ASh
    Sep 2, 2015 at 11:13
  • 3
    Both RemoveAll and Remove are O(n), so it's easy to believe the one which has an additional for loop will perform n times slower.
    – Groo
    Sep 2, 2015 at 11:19
  • 2
    @Brainless RemoveAt doesn't perform any comparison, it simply removes the item at the specified position. Remove on the other hand has to search for the item that is equal to its argument. Sep 2, 2015 at 11:29
  • 2
    @Brainless: imo the best approach(in terms of readability and performance) is a combination of RemoveAll and LINQ: intervals.RemoveAll(i => points.Any(p => i.Intersects(p))); Sep 2, 2015 at 11:49

4 Answers 4

33

If you remove an item from a List<T>, all the items after it will be moved back one spot. So if you remove n items, a lot of items will be moved n times.
RemoveAll will only do the moving once, which you can see in the source for List<T>: source

Another thing is that Remove(T item) will search the entire List for the item, so that's another n operations.

Something that has nothing to do with your question, but I'd like to point out anyway:
If you use a for-loop to delete items from a List, it's a lot easier to start at the end:

for (int i = intervals.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
{
    if (intervals[i].Intersects(point))
    {
        intervals.RemoveAt(i);
    }
}

This way, you don't need that ugly else-clause

10
  • 1
    @Brainless because if starting from the end, you don't have to "compensate" your i when removing, and get rid of the else clause, which makes for more readable code. By the way, your original loop is wrong... it'll move 2 slots forward when not removing (not one): the for statement will increase one, and your else will increase another
    – Jcl
    Sep 2, 2015 at 11:29
  • 1
    @Brainless. If you remove let's say list[3], all the items at index 4, 5, etc will be moved back one spot. But that's territory were you've already been. It won't mess with items 0,1 and 2.
    – Dennis_E
    Sep 2, 2015 at 11:30
  • 1
    @Brainless Because if you remove items, you don’t end up skipping the next element (since the index should stay the same instead). As you can see, when iterating backwards, you don’t need to do the i++/i-- separately within the loop body.
    – poke
    Sep 2, 2015 at 11:30
  • 1
    @Brainless because moving from bottom to top does not require skipping increase in counter for one spot if an item is removed..
    – Kryptonian
    Sep 2, 2015 at 11:30
  • 1
    It also has the potential to be significantly faster. Consider the extreme case where all elements are removed from the list: if you start from the back, there's no "shifting" of the remaining elements, so it's O(n). If you start from the front, it's O(n²) because each removal requires shifting the remainder of the list
    – Mark Sowul
    Sep 2, 2015 at 14:54
12

RemoveAll can be done in O(n) by checking the condition for n elements and moving at most n elements.

Your loop is O(n^2), as each Remove needs to check up to n elements. And even if you change it to RemoveAt, it still needs to move up to n elements.

This might be the fastest solution: intervals.RemoveAll(x => points.Any(x.Intersects));

3

List is an array, and removing one element from an array requires moving all elements after the one you're removing to the previous index, so a[i] is moved to a[i-1].

Doing this repeatedly requires multiple moves, even if more elements meet the removal criteria. RemoveAll may optimize this by moving the elements by more than 1 index at a time as it traverses the list and finds more elements that match the removal criteria.

0

The difference is that Remove itself is an O(n), so you get O(n^2).

Replace for with a new collection and an assignment.

items = items.Where(i => ...).ToList();

This method has the same algorithmic time complexity as RemoveAll, but uses extra O(n) memory.

3

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