219

In C#, can I convert a string value to a string literal, the way I would see it in code? I would like to replace tabs, newlines, etc. with their escape sequences.

If this code:

Console.WriteLine(someString);

produces:

Hello
World!

I want this code:

Console.WriteLine(ToLiteral(someString));

to produce:

\tHello\r\n\tWorld!\r\n

16 Answers 16

200

A long time ago, I found this:

private static string ToLiteral(string input)
{
    using (var writer = new StringWriter())
    {
        using (var provider = CodeDomProvider.CreateProvider("CSharp"))
        {
            provider.GenerateCodeFromExpression(new CodePrimitiveExpression(input), writer, null);
            return writer.ToString();
        }
    }
}

This code:

var input = "\tHello\r\n\tWorld!";
Console.WriteLine(input);
Console.WriteLine(ToLiteral(input));

Produces:

    Hello
    World!
"\tHello\r\n\tWorld!"

These days, Graham discovered you can use Roslyn's Microsoft.CodeAnalysis.CSharp package on NuGet:

private static string ToLiteral(string valueTextForCompiler)
{
    return Microsoft.CodeAnalysis.CSharp.SymbolDisplay.FormatLiteral(valueTextForCompiler, false);
}
12
  • 1
    Just found this from google the subject. This has to be best, no point in reinventing stuff that .net can do for us Jan 19, 2010 at 13:58
  • 20
    Nice one, but be aware that for longer strings, this will insert "+" operators, newlines and indentation. I couldn't find a way to turn that off.
    – Timwi
    May 4, 2010 at 21:49
  • 4
    What about the inverse ? If you have a file with text containg escape sequences incluidng especial character escaped with its ascii code ? How to produce a raw version ?
    – Luciano
    Nov 29, 2012 at 16:57
  • 1
    If you run: void Main() { Console.WriteLine(ToLiteral("test \"\'\\\0\a\b\f\n\r\t\v\uaaaa \\\blah")); } you'll notice that this doesn't take care of a few escapes. Ronnie Overby pointed \f, the others are \a and \b
    – costa
    Feb 1, 2013 at 21:34
  • 6
    Is there a way to make it output verbatim (@"...") literals?
    – rookie1024
    Mar 27, 2016 at 20:35
45

Use Regex.Escape(String):

Regex.Escape escapes a minimal set of characters (, *, +, ?, |, {, [, (,), ^, $,., #, and white space) by replacing them with their escape codes.

5
  • 8
    +1 no idea why this is way below. Other answers are just too verbose and look like reinventing wheels Jul 10, 2014 at 22:38
  • 54
    This is not what OP is asking for. It doesn't return a string literal, it returns a string with Regex special characters escaped. This would turn Hello World? into Hello World\?, but that is an invalid string literal.
    – atheaos
    May 22, 2015 at 20:00
  • 3
    I agree with @atheaos, this is a great answer to a very different question.
    – hypehuman
    Jul 31, 2015 at 20:58
  • 7
    +1 even though it doesn't quite answer the OP's question it was what I (and so I suspect maybe others) were looking for when I came across this question. :)
    – GazB
    Jun 8, 2016 at 15:29
  • This will not work as needed. The regex special characters are not the same. It will work for \n for example, but when you have a space, it will be converted to "\ " which is not what C# would do...
    – Ernesto
    Sep 23, 2019 at 18:37
28

This is a fully working implementation, including escaping of Unicode and ASCII non-printable characters. It does not insert "+" signs like Hallgrim's answer.

static string ToLiteral(string input) {
    StringBuilder literal = new StringBuilder(input.Length + 2);
    literal.Append("\"");
    foreach (var c in input) {
        switch (c) {
            case '\"': literal.Append("\\\""); break;
            case '\\': literal.Append(@"\\"); break;
            case '\0': literal.Append(@"\0"); break;
            case '\a': literal.Append(@"\a"); break;
            case '\b': literal.Append(@"\b"); break;
            case '\f': literal.Append(@"\f"); break;
            case '\n': literal.Append(@"\n"); break;
            case '\r': literal.Append(@"\r"); break;
            case '\t': literal.Append(@"\t"); break;
            case '\v': literal.Append(@"\v"); break;
            default:
                // ASCII printable character
                if (c >= 0x20 && c <= 0x7e) {
                    literal.Append(c);
                // As UTF16 escaped character
                } else {
                    literal.Append(@"\u");
                    literal.Append(((int)c).ToString("x4"));
                }
                break;
        }
    }
    literal.Append("\"");
    return literal.ToString();
}

Note that this also escapes all Unicode characters. If your environment supports them, you could change that part to escape only control characters:

// UTF16 control characters
} else if (Char.GetUnicodeCategory(c) == UnicodeCategory.Control) {
    literal.Append(@"\u");
    literal.Append(((int)c).ToString("x4"));
} else {
    literal.Append(c);
}
7
  • 2
    You should use Char.GetUnicodeCategory(c) == UnicodeCategory.Control to decide whether to escape it, or people who don't speak ASCII won't be very happy.
    – deerchao
    Jan 24, 2013 at 13:15
  • This depends on situation if your resulting string will be used in the environment supporting unicode or not.
    – Smilediver
    Jan 29, 2013 at 13:59
  • 1
    I added input = input ?? string.Empty; as the first line of the method so I could pass null and get back "" instead of a null reference exception.
    – Andy
    Jan 8, 2017 at 19:23
  • Nice. Change enclosing quotes to ' and now you have what Python gives you out of the box with repr(a_string) :).
    – z33k
    Nov 7, 2019 at 12:14
  • Why did you escape ' as that is not necessary? Aug 17, 2021 at 3:05
26

There's a method for this in Roslyn's Microsoft.CodeAnalysis.CSharp package on NuGet:

private static string ToLiteral(string valueTextForCompiler)
{
    return Microsoft.CodeAnalysis.CSharp.SymbolDisplay.FormatLiteral(valueTextForCompiler, false);
}

Obviously, this didn't exist at the time of the original question, but it might help people who end up here from Google Search.

5
  • 1
    this is a nice way to do it from .net core. Apr 27, 2021 at 14:34
  • 1
    Yes, the package supports .NET Core and .NET Standard 2.0 - meaning it can also be referenced from .NET Framework 4.6.1+
    – Graham
    Apr 29, 2021 at 14:32
  • 3
    Also useful in source generators.
    – Cine
    May 18, 2021 at 9:45
  • This is the only way that escaped all the characters for me
    – Dan
    May 13 at 18:54
  • Works great, but I need a way to restore the original unescaped string. Sep 28 at 23:48
26

A more structured approach, including all escape sequences for strings and chars, is:

It doesn't replace Unicode characters with their literal equivalent. It doesn't cook eggs, either.

public class ReplaceString
{
    static readonly IDictionary<string, string> m_replaceDict
        = new Dictionary<string, string>();

    const string ms_regexEscapes = @"[\a\b\f\n\r\t\v\\""]";

    public static string StringLiteral(string i_string)
    {
        return Regex.Replace(i_string, ms_regexEscapes, match);
    }

    public static string CharLiteral(char c)
    {
        return c == '\'' ? @"'\''" : string.Format("'{0}'", c);
    }

    private static string match(Match m)
    {
        string match = m.ToString();
        if (m_replaceDict.ContainsKey(match))
        {
            return m_replaceDict[match];
        }

        throw new NotSupportedException();
    }

    static ReplaceString()
    {
        m_replaceDict.Add("\a", @"\a");
        m_replaceDict.Add("\b", @"\b");
        m_replaceDict.Add("\f", @"\f");
        m_replaceDict.Add("\n", @"\n");
        m_replaceDict.Add("\r", @"\r");
        m_replaceDict.Add("\t", @"\t");
        m_replaceDict.Add("\v", @"\v");

        m_replaceDict.Add("\\", @"\\");
        m_replaceDict.Add("\0", @"\0");

        //The SO parser gets fooled by the verbatim version
        //of the string to replace - @"\"""
        //so use the 'regular' version
        m_replaceDict.Add("\"", "\\\"");
    }

    static void Main(string[] args){

        string s = "here's a \"\n\tstring\" to test";
        Console.WriteLine(ReplaceString.StringLiteral(s));
        Console.WriteLine(ReplaceString.CharLiteral('c'));
        Console.WriteLine(ReplaceString.CharLiteral('\''));

    }
}
4
  • This is not all escape sequences ;)
    – TcKs
    Nov 27, 2008 at 12:51
  • 1
    Works better than the solution above - and other escape sequences can easily be added. Aug 10, 2014 at 11:15
  • Verbatim in the accepted answer was driving me bonkers. This works 100% for my purpose. Replaced regex with @"[\a\b\f\n\r\t\v\\""/]"and added m_replaceDict.Add("/", @"\/"); for JSON. Jun 29, 2017 at 17:12
  • Also, you have to add the enclosing quotations to this if you want those. Jun 29, 2017 at 20:38
21

Try:

var t = HttpUtility.JavaScriptStringEncode(s);
3
  • Does not work. If I have "abc\n123" (without quotes, 8 chars), I want "abc" + \n + "123" (7 chars). Instead it produces "abc" + "\\" + "\n123" (9 chars). Notice the slash was doubled and it still contains a string literal of "\n" as two characters, not the escaped character.
    – Paul
    Mar 7, 2012 at 20:13
  • 2
    @Paul What you want is the opposite of what the question is asking, though. This, according to your description, answers the question, and therefore does work.
    – Nic
    Jan 4, 2017 at 20:19
  • I found this useful to escape active directory names in the frontend
    – chakeda
    Oct 17, 2017 at 17:37
19
public static class StringHelpers
{
    private static Dictionary<string, string> escapeMapping = new Dictionary<string, string>()
    {
        {"\"", @"\\\"""},
        {"\\\\", @"\\"},
        {"\a", @"\a"},
        {"\b", @"\b"},
        {"\f", @"\f"},
        {"\n", @"\n"},
        {"\r", @"\r"},
        {"\t", @"\t"},
        {"\v", @"\v"},
        {"\0", @"\0"},
    };

    private static Regex escapeRegex = new Regex(string.Join("|", escapeMapping.Keys.ToArray()));

    public static string Escape(this string s)
    {
        return escapeRegex.Replace(s, EscapeMatchEval);
    }

    private static string EscapeMatchEval(Match m)
    {
        if (escapeMapping.ContainsKey(m.Value))
        {
            return escapeMapping[m.Value];
        }
        return escapeMapping[Regex.Escape(m.Value)];
    }
}
2
  • 2
    Why is there 3 backslashes and two speech marks in the first value of the dictionary? Mar 30, 2017 at 9:19
  • Nice answer, @JamesYeoman that's because regex pattern needs to be escaped. Aug 13, 2018 at 22:53
19

Hallgrim's answer is excellent, but the "+", newline and indent additions were breaking functionality for me. An easy way around it is:

private static string ToLiteral(string input)
{
    using (var writer = new StringWriter())
    {
        using (var provider = CodeDomProvider.CreateProvider("CSharp"))
        {
            provider.GenerateCodeFromExpression(new CodePrimitiveExpression(input), writer, new CodeGeneratorOptions {IndentString = "\t"});
            var literal = writer.ToString();
            literal = literal.Replace(string.Format("\" +{0}\t\"", Environment.NewLine), "");
            return literal;
        }
    }
}
4
  • Works great. I also added one line before the return literal to make it more readable: literal = literal.Replace("\\r\\n", "\\r\\n\"+\r\n\"");
    – Bob
    May 8, 2013 at 17:54
  • Added this literal = literal.Replace("/", @"\/"); for JSON functionality. Jun 29, 2017 at 15:32
  • This is 100% straight forward and the only correct answer! All other answers either didn't understand the question or re-invented the wheel.
    – bytecode77
    Dec 27, 2017 at 13:47
  • Sad, cannot get this to work under DOTNET CORE. Anyone has a better answer?
    – s k
    Feb 6, 2018 at 8:33
10

Here is a little improvement for Smilediver's answer. It will not escape all no-ASCII characters, but only these are really needed.

using System;
using System.Globalization;
using System.Text;

public static class CodeHelper
{
    public static string ToLiteral(this string input)
    {
        var literal = new StringBuilder(input.Length + 2);
        literal.Append("\"");
        foreach (var c in input)
        {
            switch (c)
            {
                case '\'': literal.Append(@"\'"); break;
                case '\"': literal.Append("\\\""); break;
                case '\\': literal.Append(@"\\"); break;
                case '\0': literal.Append(@"\0"); break;
                case '\a': literal.Append(@"\a"); break;
                case '\b': literal.Append(@"\b"); break;
                case '\f': literal.Append(@"\f"); break;
                case '\n': literal.Append(@"\n"); break;
                case '\r': literal.Append(@"\r"); break;
                case '\t': literal.Append(@"\t"); break;
                case '\v': literal.Append(@"\v"); break;
                default:
                    if (Char.GetUnicodeCategory(c) != UnicodeCategory.Control)
                    {
                        literal.Append(c);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        literal.Append(@"\u");
                        literal.Append(((ushort)c).ToString("x4"));
                    }
                    break;
            }
        }
        literal.Append("\"");
        return literal.ToString();
    }
}
0
8

Interesting question.

If you can't find a better method, you can always replace.
In case you're opting for it, you could use this C# Escape Sequence List:

  • \' - single quote, needed for character literals
  • \" - double quote, needed for string literals
  • \ - backslash
  • \0 - Unicode character 0
  • \a - Alert (character 7)
  • \b - Backspace (character 8)
  • \f - Form feed (character 12)
  • \n - New line (character 10)
  • \r - Carriage return (character 13)
  • \t - Horizontal tab (character 9)
  • \v - Vertical quote (character 11)
  • \uxxxx - Unicode escape sequence for character with hex value xxxx
  • \xn[n][n][n] - Unicode escape sequence for character with hex value nnnn (variable length version of \uxxxx)
  • \Uxxxxxxxx - Unicode escape sequence for character with hex value xxxxxxxx (for generating surrogates)

This list can be found in the C# Frequently Asked Questions What character escape sequences are available?

2
  • 3
    This link no longer works, a textbook example of why link-only answers are discouraged.
    – James
    Apr 4, 2017 at 12:44
  • 1
    Very true, @James, but thanks to Jamie Twells the information is available again :+1: Jan 23, 2019 at 10:50
4

If JSON conventions are enough for the unescaped strings you want to get escaped and you already use Json.NET (Newtonsoft.Json) in your project (it has a pretty large overhead), you may use this package like the following:

using System;
using Newtonsoft.Json;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ToLiteral(@"abc\n123"));
    }

    private static string ToLiteral(string input)
    {
        return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<string>("\"" + input + "\"");
    }
}
1
  • This seems to be the opposite of what OP wants? JsonConvert.SerializeObject(input).Trim('"') works great though. Apr 12 at 22:36
2
public static class StringEscape
{
  static char[] toEscape = "\0\x1\x2\x3\x4\x5\x6\a\b\t\n\v\f\r\xe\xf\x10\x11\x12\x13\x14\x15\x16\x17\x18\x19\x1a\x1b\x1c\x1d\x1e\x1f\"\\".ToCharArray();
  static string[] literals = @"\0,\x0001,\x0002,\x0003,\x0004,\x0005,\x0006,\a,\b,\t,\n,\v,\f,\r,\x000e,\x000f,\x0010,\x0011,\x0012,\x0013,\x0014,\x0015,\x0016,\x0017,\x0018,\x0019,\x001a,\x001b,\x001c,\x001d,\x001e,\x001f".Split(new char[] { ',' });

  public static string Escape(this string input)
  {
    int i = input.IndexOfAny(toEscape);
    if (i < 0) return input;

    var sb = new System.Text.StringBuilder(input.Length + 5);
    int j = 0;
    do
    {
      sb.Append(input, j, i - j);
      var c = input[i];
      if (c < 0x20) sb.Append(literals[c]); else sb.Append(@"\").Append(c);
    } while ((i = input.IndexOfAny(toEscape, j = ++i)) > 0);

    return sb.Append(input, j, input.Length - j).ToString();
  }
}
1
  • An explanation would be in order. E.g., what is the idea/gist? E.g., is it due to performance considerations? Please respond by editing your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Jun 22, 2021 at 16:50
2

My attempt at adding ToVerbatim to Hallgrim's accepted answer:

private static string ToLiteral(string input)
{
    using (var writer = new StringWriter())
    {
        using (var provider = CodeDomProvider.CreateProvider("CSharp"))
        {
            provider.GenerateCodeFromExpression(new CodePrimitiveExpression(input), writer, new CodeGeneratorOptions { IndentString = "\t" });
            var literal = writer.ToString();
            literal = literal.Replace(string.Format("\" +{0}\t\"", Environment.NewLine), "");
            return literal;
        }
    }
}

private static string ToVerbatim(string input)
{
    string literal = ToLiteral(input);
    string verbatim = "@" + literal.Replace(@"\r\n", Environment.NewLine);
    return verbatim;
}
0
1

Hallgrim's answer was excellent. Here's a small tweak in case you need to parse out additional white space characters and linebreaks with a C# regular expression. I needed this in the case of a serialized JSON value for insertion into Google Sheets and ran into trouble as the code was inserting tabs, +, spaces, etc.

  provider.GenerateCodeFromExpression(new CodePrimitiveExpression(input), writer, null);
  var literal = writer.ToString();
  var r2 = new Regex(@"\"" \+.\n[\s]+\""", RegexOptions.ECMAScript);
  literal = r2.Replace(literal, "");
  return literal;
0

I submit my own implementation, which handles null values and should be more performant on account of using array lookup tables, manual hex conversion, and avoiding switch statements.

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Linq;

public static class StringLiteralEncoding {
  private static readonly char[] HEX_DIGIT_LOWER = "0123456789abcdef".ToCharArray();
  private static readonly char[] LITERALENCODE_ESCAPE_CHARS;

  static StringLiteralEncoding() {
    // Per http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/h21280bw.aspx
    var escapes = new string[] { "\aa", "\bb", "\ff", "\nn", "\rr", "\tt", "\vv", "\"\"", "\\\\", "??", "\00" };
    LITERALENCODE_ESCAPE_CHARS = new char[escapes.Max(e => e[0]) + 1];
    foreach(var escape in escapes)
      LITERALENCODE_ESCAPE_CHARS[escape[0]] = escape[1];
  }

  /// <summary>
  /// Convert the string to the equivalent C# string literal, enclosing the string in double quotes and inserting
  /// escape sequences as necessary.
  /// </summary>
  /// <param name="s">The string to be converted to a C# string literal.</param>
  /// <returns><paramref name="s"/> represented as a C# string literal.</returns>
  public static string Encode(string s) {
    if(null == s) return "null";

    var sb = new StringBuilder(s.Length + 2).Append('"');
    for(var rp = 0; rp < s.Length; rp++) {
      var c = s[rp];
      if(c < LITERALENCODE_ESCAPE_CHARS.Length && '\0' != LITERALENCODE_ESCAPE_CHARS[c])
        sb.Append('\\').Append(LITERALENCODE_ESCAPE_CHARS[c]);
      else if('~' >= c && c >= ' ')
        sb.Append(c);
      else
        sb.Append(@"\x")
          .Append(HEX_DIGIT_LOWER[c >> 12 & 0x0F])
          .Append(HEX_DIGIT_LOWER[c >>  8 & 0x0F])
          .Append(HEX_DIGIT_LOWER[c >>  4 & 0x0F])
          .Append(HEX_DIGIT_LOWER[c       & 0x0F]);
    }

    return sb.Append('"').ToString();
  }
}
1
  • Why are switch statements bad? Aren't they optimised by the compiler (lookup tables or similar)? Jun 22, 2021 at 16:47
-9

Code:

string someString1 = "\tHello\r\n\tWorld!\r\n";
string someString2 = @"\tHello\r\n\tWorld!\r\n";

Console.WriteLine(someString1);
Console.WriteLine(someString2);

Output:

    Hello
    World!

\tHello\r\n\tWorld!\r\n
2
  • 1
    I have someString1, but it is read from a file. I want it to appear as someString2 after calling some method.
    – Hallgrim
    Nov 27, 2008 at 21:51
  • The string may be dynamically created/obtained he needs a method to handle any string
    – rufw91
    Nov 30, 2021 at 8:42

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