I'd like to return a string from a Bash function.

I'll write the example in java to show what I'd like to do:

public String getSomeString() {
  return "tadaa";
}

String variable = getSomeString();

The example below works in bash, but is there a better way to do this?

function getSomeString {
   echo "tadaa"
}

VARIABLE=$(getSomeString)
  • 2
    As an aside, function funcName { is pre-POSIX legacy syntax inherited from early ksh (where it had semantic differences that bash doesn't honor). funcName() {, with no function, should be used instead; see wiki.bash-hackers.org/scripting/obsolete – Charles Duffy Mar 7 at 17:14

18 Answers 18

up vote 234 down vote accepted

There is no better way I know of. Bash knows only status codes (integers) and strings written to the stdout.

  • 13
    +1 @tomas-f : you have to be really careful on what you have in this function "getSomeString()" as having any code which will eventually echo will mean that you get incorrect return string. – Mani Sep 14 '12 at 16:38
  • 9
    This is just plain wrong. You can return arbitrary data inside a return variable. Which clearly is a better way. – Evi1M4chine Jan 5 '16 at 16:18
  • 20
    @Evi1M4chine, um...no, you can't. You can set a global variable and call it "return", as I see you do in your scripts. But then that is by convention, NOT actually tied programmatically to the execution of your code. "clearly a better way"? Um, no. Command substitution is far more explicit and modular. – Wildcard Jan 6 '16 at 3:24
  • 5
    "Command substitution is far more explicit and modular" would be relevant if the question were about commands; this question is how to return a string, from a bash function! A built in way to do what the OP has asked is available since Bash 4.3 (2014?) - see my answer below. – zenaan Oct 10 '16 at 3:07
  • As EviM4chine, I do not agree with your point of view. You can pass variable to function – Tony Chemit Sep 5 '17 at 13:58

You could have the function take a variable as the first arg and modify the variable with the string you want to return.

#!/bin/bash
set -x
function pass_back_a_string() {
    eval "$1='foo bar rab oof'"
}

return_var=''
pass_back_a_string return_var
echo $return_var

Prints "foo bar rab oof".

Edit: added quoting in the appropriate place to allow whitespace in string to address @Luca Borrione's comment.

Edit: As a demonstration, see the following program. This is a general-purpose solution: it even allows you to receive a string into a local variable.

#!/bin/bash
set -x
function pass_back_a_string() {
    eval "$1='foo bar rab oof'"
}

return_var=''
pass_back_a_string return_var
echo $return_var

function call_a_string_func() {
     local lvar=''
     pass_back_a_string lvar
     echo "lvar='$lvar' locally"
}

call_a_string_func
echo "lvar='$lvar' globally"

This prints:

+ return_var=
+ pass_back_a_string return_var
+ eval 'return_var='\''foo bar rab oof'\'''
++ return_var='foo bar rab oof'
+ echo foo bar rab oof
foo bar rab oof
+ call_a_string_func
+ local lvar=
+ pass_back_a_string lvar
+ eval 'lvar='\''foo bar rab oof'\'''
++ lvar='foo bar rab oof'
+ echo 'lvar='\''foo bar rab oof'\'' locally'
lvar='foo bar rab oof' locally
+ echo 'lvar='\'''\'' globally'
lvar='' globally

Edit: demonstrating that the original variable's value is available in the function, as was incorrectly criticized by @Xichen Li in a comment.

#!/bin/bash
set -x
function pass_back_a_string() {
    eval "echo in pass_back_a_string, original $1 is \$$1"
    eval "$1='foo bar rab oof'"
}

return_var='original return_var'
pass_back_a_string return_var
echo $return_var

function call_a_string_func() {
     local lvar='original lvar'
     pass_back_a_string lvar
     echo "lvar='$lvar' locally"
}

call_a_string_func
echo "lvar='$lvar' globally"

This gives output:

+ return_var='original return_var'
+ pass_back_a_string return_var
+ eval 'echo in pass_back_a_string, original return_var is $return_var'
++ echo in pass_back_a_string, original return_var is original return_var
in pass_back_a_string, original return_var is original return_var
+ eval 'return_var='\''foo bar rab oof'\'''
++ return_var='foo bar rab oof'
+ echo foo bar rab oof
foo bar rab oof
+ call_a_string_func
+ local 'lvar=original lvar'
+ pass_back_a_string lvar
+ eval 'echo in pass_back_a_string, original lvar is $lvar'
++ echo in pass_back_a_string, original lvar is original lvar
in pass_back_a_string, original lvar is original lvar
+ eval 'lvar='\''foo bar rab oof'\'''
++ lvar='foo bar rab oof'
+ echo 'lvar='\''foo bar rab oof'\'' locally'
lvar='foo bar rab oof' locally
+ echo 'lvar='\'''\'' globally'
lvar='' globally
  • 1
    This answer is great! Parameters can be passed by references, similar to the idea in C++. – Yun Huang Apr 19 '12 at 6:08
  • 3
    It would be nice to receive a response from an expert about that answer. I've never seen that used in scripts, maybe for a good reason. Anyway: that's +1 It should have been voted for correct answer – John Apr 19 '12 at 11:46
  • Isn't this the same of fgm answer written in a simplified way? This won't work if the string foo contains white spaces, while the fgm's one will .. as he's showing. – Luca Borrione May 8 '12 at 21:32
  • 4
    @XichenLi: thanks for leaving a comment with your downvote; please see my edit. You can get the initial value of the variable in the function with \$$1. If you are looking for something different, please let me know. – bstpierre Dec 4 '12 at 16:46
  • 1
    @timiscoding That can be fixed with a printf '%q' "$var". %q is a format string for shell escape. Then just pass it raw. – bb010g Jul 23 '15 at 21:53

All answers above ignore what has been stated in the man page of bash.

  • All variables declared inside a function will be shared with the calling environment.
  • All variables declared local will not be shared.

Example code

#!/bin/bash

f()
{
    echo function starts
    local WillNotExists="It still does!"
    DoesNotExists="It still does!"
    echo function ends
}

echo $DoesNotExists #Should print empty line
echo $WillNotExists #Should print empty line
f                   #Call the function
echo $DoesNotExists #Should print It still does!
echo $WillNotExists #Should print empty line

And output

$ sh -x ./x.sh
+ echo

+ echo

+ f
+ echo function starts 
function starts
+ local 'WillNotExists=It still does!'
+ DoesNotExists='It still does!'
+ echo function ends 
function ends
+ echo It still 'does!' 
It still does!
+ echo

Also under pdksh and ksh this script does the same!

  • I commented your head up posting an answer – Luca Borrione May 8 '12 at 22:20
  • 10
    This answer does have its merits. I came in here thinking that I wanted to return a string from a function. This answer made me realize that that was just my C#-habits talking. I suspect others may have the same experience. – LOAS Apr 15 '13 at 7:29
  • 4
    @ElmarZander You're wrong, this is entirely relevant. This is a simple way to get into global scope a function-scope value, and some would consider this better/simpler than the eval approach to redefine a global variable as outlined by bstpierre. – KomodoDave May 17 '13 at 12:32
  • local is not portable to non-bash scripts which is one reason some people avoid it. – don bright Mar 22 '14 at 16:05
  • 1
    On a mac ($ bash --version GNU bash, version 3.2.57(1)-release (x86_64-apple-darwin14) Copyright (C) 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc.), it is correct that a matching global variable is initialized, but when I try to side-effect the same variable in another function f2, that side-effect is not persisted. So, it seems very inconsistent and thus not good for my usage. – AnneTheAgile Oct 2 '15 at 19:42

Like bstpierre above, I use and recommend the use of explicitly naming output variables:

function some_func() # OUTVAR ARG1
{
   local _outvar=$1
   local _result # Use some naming convention to avoid OUTVARs to clash
   ... some processing ....
   eval $_outvar=\$_result # Instead of just =$_result
}

Note the use of quoting the $. This will avoid interpreting content in $result as shell special characters. I have found that this is an order of magnitude faster than the result=$(some_func "arg1") idiom of capturing an echo. The speed difference seems even more notable using bash on MSYS where stdout capturing from function calls is almost catastrophic.

It's ok to send in a local variables since locals are dynamically scoped in bash:

function another_func() # ARG
{
   local result
   some_func result "$1"
   echo result is $result
}
  • 4
    This helps me because I like to use multiple echo statements for debugging / logging purposes. The idiom of capturing echo fails since it captures all of them. Thank you! – AnneTheAgile Oct 2 '15 at 20:03
  • This is the (second-best) proper solution! Clean, fast, elegant, sensible. – Evi1M4chine Jan 5 '16 at 16:21

Bash, since version 4.3, feb 2014(?), has explicit support for reference variables or name references (namerefs), beyond "eval", with the same beneficial performance and indirection effect, and which may be clearer in your scripts and also harder to "forget to 'eval' and have to fix this error":

declare [-aAfFgilnrtux] [-p] [name[=value] ...]
typeset [-aAfFgilnrtux] [-p] [name[=value] ...]
  Declare variables and/or give them attributes
  ...
  -n Give each name the nameref attribute, making it a name reference
     to another variable.  That other variable is defined by the value
     of name.  All references and assignments to name, except for⋅
     changing the -n attribute itself, are performed on the variable
     referenced by name's value.  The -n attribute cannot be applied to
     array variables.
...
When used in a function, declare and typeset make each name local,
as with the local command, unless the -g option is supplied...

and also:

PARAMETERS

A variable can be assigned the nameref attribute using the -n option to the declare or local builtin commands (see the descriptions of declare and local below) to create a nameref, or a reference to another variable. This allows variables to be manipulated indirectly. Whenever the nameref variable is⋅ referenced or assigned to, the operation is actually performed on the variable specified by the nameref variable's value. A nameref is commonly used within shell functions to refer to a variable whose name is passed as an argument to⋅ the function. For instance, if a variable name is passed to a shell function as its first argument, running

      declare -n ref=$1

inside the function creates a nameref variable ref whose value is the variable name passed as the first argument. References and assignments to ref are treated as references and assignments to the variable whose name was passed as⋅ $1. If the control variable in a for loop has the nameref attribute, the list of words can be a list of shell variables, and a name reference will be⋅ established for each word in the list, in turn, when the loop is executed. Array variables cannot be given the -n attribute. However, nameref variables can reference array variables and subscripted array variables. Namerefs can be⋅ unset using the -n option to the unset builtin. Otherwise, if unset is executed with the name of a nameref variable as an argument, the variable referenced by⋅ the nameref variable will be unset.

For example (EDIT 2: (thank you Ron) namespaced (prefixed) the function-internal variable name, to minimize external variable clashes, which should finally answer properly, the issue raised in the comments by Karsten):

# $1 : string; your variable to contain the return value
function return_a_string () {
    declare -n ret=$1
    local MYLIB_return_a_string_message="The date is "
    MYLIB_return_a_string_message+=$(date)
    ret=$MYLIB_return_a_string_message
}

and testing this example:

$ return_a_string result; echo $result
The date is 20160817

Note that the bash "declare" builtin, when used in a function, makes the declared variable "local" by default, and "-n" can also be used with "local".

I prefer to distinguish "important declare" variables from "boring local" variables, so using "declare" and "local" in this way acts as documentation.

EDIT 1 - (Response to comment below by Karsten) - I cannot add comments below any more, but Karsten's comment got me thinking, so I did the following test which WORKS FINE, AFAICT - Karsten if you read this, please provide an exact set of test steps from the command line, showing the problem you assume exists, because these following steps work just fine:

$ return_a_string ret; echo $ret
The date is 20170104

(I ran this just now, after pasting the above function into a bash term - as you can see, the result works just fine.)

  • 2
    It is my hope that this percolates to the top. eval should be a last resort. Worthy of mention is that nameref variables are only available since bash 4.3 (according to the changelog ) (released in feb 2014[?]). This is important if portability is a concern. Please cite the bash manual on the fact that declare creates local variables inside functions (that info is not given by help declare): "...When used in a function, declare and typeset make each name local, as with the local command, unless the -g option is supplied..." – init_js Oct 8 '16 at 7:52
  • Updated to include your suggestions. Thanks :) – zenaan Oct 9 '16 at 22:57
  • This has the same aliasing problem as the eval solution. When you call a function and pass in the name of the output variable, you have to avoid passing the name of a variable that is used locally within the function you call. That's a major problem in terms of encapsulation, as you can't just add or rename new local variables in a function without if any of the functions callers might want to use that name for the output parameter. – Karsten Jan 3 '17 at 11:23
  • @Karsten agreed. in both cases (eval and namerefs), you may have to pick a different name. One advantage with the nameref approach over eval is that one doesn't have to deal with escaping strings. Of course, you can always do something like K=$1; V=$2; eval "$A='$V'";, but one mistake (e.g. an empty or omitted parameter), and it would be more dangerous. @zenaan the issue raised by @Karsten applies if you choose "message" as the return variable name, instead of "ret". – init_js Mar 5 '17 at 7:12
  • 1
    A function presumably must be designed from the beginning to accept a nameref argument, so the function author should be aware of the possibility of a name collision and can use some typical convention to avoid that. E.g., inside function X, name local variables with convention "X_LOCAL_name". – Ron Burk Apr 8 '17 at 17:54

You could also capture the function output:

#!/bin/bash
function getSomeString() {
     echo "tadaa!"
}

return_var=$(getSomeString)
echo $return_var
# Alternative syntax:
return_var=`getSomeString`
echo $return_var

Looks weird, but is better than using global variables IMHO. Passing parameters works as usual, just put them inside the braces or backticks.

  • 6
    apart from the alternative syntax note, isn't this the exact same thing the op already wrote in his own question? – Luca Borrione May 8 '12 at 21:43

As previously mentioned, the "correct" way to return a string from a function is with command substitution. In the event that the function also needs to output to console (as @Mani mentions above), create a temporary fd in the beginning of the function and redirect to console. Close the temporary fd before returning your string.

#!/bin/bash
# file:  func_return_test.sh
returnString() {
    exec 3>&1 >/dev/tty
    local s=$1
    s=${s:="some default string"}
    echo "writing directly to console"
    exec 3>&-     
    echo "$s"
}

my_string=$(returnString "$*")
echo "my_string:  [$my_string]"

executing script with no params produces...

# ./func_return_test.sh
writing directly to console
my_string:  [some default string]

hope this helps people

-Andy

  • 3
    That has its uses, but on the whole you should avoid making an explicit redirect to the console; the output may already be redirected, or the script may be running in a context where no tty exists. You could get around that by duplicating 3>&1 at the head of the script, then manipulating &1 &3 and another placeholder &4 within the function. Ugly all round, though. – jmb Mar 13 '14 at 11:40

The most straightforward and robust solution is to use command substitution, as other people wrote:

assign()
{
    local x
    x="Test"
    echo "$x"
}

x=$(assign) # This assigns string "Test" to x

The downside is performance as this requires a separate process.

The other technique suggested in this topic, namely passing the name of a variable to assign to as an argument, has side effects, and I wouldn't recommend it in its basic form. The problem is that you will probably need some variables in the function to calculate the return value, and it may happen that the name of the variable intended to store the return value will interfere with one of them:

assign()
{
    local x
    x="Test"
    eval "$1=\$x"
}

assign y # This assigns string "Test" to y, as expected

assign x # This will NOT assign anything to x in this scope
         # because the name "x" is declared as local inside the function

You might, of course, not declare internal variables of the function as local, but you really should always do it as otherwise you may, on the other hand, accidentally overwrite an unrelated variable from the parent scope if there is one with the same name.

One possible workaround is an explicit declaration of the passed variable as global:

assign()
{
    local x
    eval declare -g $1
    x="Test"
    eval "$1=\$x"
}

If name "x" is passed as an argument, the second row of the function body will overwrite the previous local declaration. But the names themselves might still interfere, so if you intend to use the value previously stored in the passed variable prior to write the return value there, be aware that you must copy it into another local variable at the very beginning; otherwise the result will be unpredictable! Besides, this will only work in the most recent version of BASH, namely 4.2. More portable code might utilize explicit conditional constructs with the same effect:

assign()
{
    if [[ $1 != x ]]; then
      local x
    fi
    x="Test"
    eval "$1=\$x"
}

Perhaps the most elegant solution is just to reserve one global name for function return values and use it consistently in every function you write.

  • 1
    This ^^^. The inadvertent aliasing that breaks encapsulation is the big problem with both the eval and declare -n solutions. The workaround of having a single dedicated variable name like result for all output parameters seems the only solution that doesn't require a functions to know all it's callers to avoid conflicts. – Karsten Jan 3 '17 at 11:31

You could use a global variable:

declare globalvar='some string'

string ()
{
  eval  "$1='some other string'"
} # ----------  end of function string  ----------

string globalvar

echo "'${globalvar}'"

This gives

'some other string'

To illustrate my comment on Andy's answer, with additional file descriptor manipulation to avoid use of /dev/tty:

#!/bin/bash

exec 3>&1

returnString() {
    exec 4>&1 >&3
    local s=$1
    s=${s:="some default string"}
    echo "writing to stdout"
    echo "writing to stderr" >&2
    exec >&4-
    echo "$s"
}

my_string=$(returnString "$*")
echo "my_string:  [$my_string]"

Still nasty, though.

The way you have it is the only way to do this without breaking scope. Bash doesn't have a concept of return types, just exit codes and file descriptors (stdin/out/err, etc)

Addressing Vicky Ronnen's head up, considering the following code:

function use_global
{
    eval "$1='changed using a global var'"
}

function capture_output
{
    echo "always changed"
}

function test_inside_a_func
{
    local _myvar='local starting value'
    echo "3. $_myvar"

    use_global '_myvar'
    echo "4. $_myvar"

    _myvar=$( capture_output )
    echo "5. $_myvar"
}

function only_difference
{
    local _myvar='local starting value'
    echo "7. $_myvar"

    local use_global '_myvar'
    echo "8. $_myvar"

    local _myvar=$( capture_output )
    echo "9. $_myvar"
}

declare myvar='global starting value'
echo "0. $myvar"

use_global 'myvar'
echo "1. $myvar"

myvar=$( capture_output )
echo "2. $myvar"

test_inside_a_func
echo "6. $_myvar" # this was local inside the above function

only_difference



will give

0. global starting value
1. changed using a global var
2. always changed
3. local starting value
4. changed using a global var
5. always changed
6. 
7. local starting value
8. local starting value
9. always changed

Maybe the normal scenario is to use the syntax used in the test_inside_a_func function, thus you can use both methods in the majority of cases, although capturing the output is the safer method always working in any situation, mimicking the returning value from a function that you can find in other languages, as Vicky Ronnen correctly pointed out.

The options have been all enumerated, I think. Choosing one may come down to a matter of the best style for your particular application, and in that vein, I want to offer one particular style I've found useful. In bash, variables and functions are not in the same namespace. So, treating the variable of the same name as the value of the function is a convention that I find minimizes name clashes and enhances readability, if I apply it rigorously. An example from real life:

UnGetChar=
function GetChar() {
    # assume failure
    GetChar=
    # if someone previously "ungot" a char
    if ! [ -z "$UnGetChar" ]; then
        GetChar="$UnGetChar"
        UnGetChar=
        return 0               # success
    # else, if not at EOF
    elif IFS= read -N1 GetChar ; then
        return 0           # success
    else
        return 1           # EOF
    fi
}

function UnGetChar(){
    UnGetChar="$1"
}

And, an example of using such functions:

function GetToken() {
    # assume failure
    GetToken=
    # if at end of file
    if ! GetChar; then
        return 1              # EOF
    # if start of comment
    elif [[ "$GetChar" == "#" ]]; then
        while [[ "$GetChar" != $'\n' ]]; do
            GetToken+="$GetChar"
            GetChar
        done
        UnGetChar "$GetChar"
    # if start of quoted string
    elif [ "$GetChar" == '"' ]; then
# ... et cetera

As you can see, the return status is there for you to use when you need it, or ignore if you don't. The "returned" variable can likewise be used or ignored, but of course only after the function is invoked.

Of course, this is only a convention. You are free to fail to set the associated value before returning (hence my convention of always nulling it at the start of the function) or to trample its value by calling the function again (possibly indirectly). Still, it's a convention I find very useful if I find myself making heavy use of bash functions.

As opposed to the sentiment that this is a sign one should e.g. "move to perl", my philosophy is that conventions are always important for managing the complexity of any language whatsoever.

They key problem of any 'named output variable' scheme where the caller can pass in the variable name (whether using eval or declare -n) is inadvertent aliasing, i.e. name clashes: From an encapsulation point of view, it's awful to not be able to add or rename a local variable in a function without checking ALL the function's callers first to make sure they're not wanting to pass that same name as the output parameter. (Or in the other direction, I don't want to have to read the source of the function I'm calling just to make sure the output parameter I intend to use is not a local in that function.)

The only way around that is to use a single dedicated output variable like REPLY (as suggested by Evi1M4chine) or a convention like the one suggested by Ron Burk.

However, it's possible to have functions use a fixed output variable internally, and then add some sugar over the top to hide this fact from the caller, as I've done with the call function in the following example. Consider this a proof of concept, but the key points are

  • The function always assigns the return value to REPLY, and can also return an exit code as usual
  • From the perspective of the caller, the return value can be assigned to any variable (local or global) including REPLY (see the wrapper example). The exit code of the function is passed through, so using them in e.g. an if or while or similar constructs works as expected.
  • Syntactically the function call is still a single simple statement.

The reason this works is because the call function itself has no locals and uses no variables other than REPLY, avoiding any potential for name clashes. At the point where the caller-defined output variable name is assigned, we're effectively in the caller's scope (technically in the identical scope of the call function), rather than in the scope of the function being called.

#!/bin/bash
function call() { # var=func [args ...]
  REPLY=; "${1#*=}" "${@:2}"; eval "${1%%=*}=\$REPLY; return $?"
}

function greet() {
  case "$1" in
    us) REPLY="hello";;
    nz) REPLY="kia ora";;
    *) return 123;;
  esac
}

function wrapper() {
  call REPLY=greet "$@"
}

function main() {
  local a b c d
  call a=greet us
  echo "a='$a' ($?)"
  call b=greet nz
  echo "b='$b' ($?)"
  call c=greet de
  echo "c='$c' ($?)"
  call d=wrapper us
  echo "d='$d' ($?)"
}
main

Output:

a='hello' (0)
b='kia ora' (0)
c='' (123)
d='hello' (0)

In my programs, by convention, this is what the pre-existing $REPLY variable is for, which read uses for that exact purpose.

function getSomeString {
  REPLY="tadaa"
}

getSomeString
echo $REPLY

This echoes

tadaa

But to avoid conflicts, any other global variable will do.

declare result

function getSomeString {
  result="tadaa"
}

getSomeString
echo $result

If that isn’t enough, I recommend Markarian451’s solution.

You can echo a string, but catch it by piping (|) the function to something else.

You can do it with expr, though ShellCheck reports this usage as deprecated.

  • This link is dead. – Charles Wood Dec 4 '13 at 21:09
  • Trouble is that the thing to the right of the pipe is a subshell. So myfunc | read OUTPUT ; echo $OUTPUT yields nothing. myfunc | ( read OUTPUT; echo $OUTPUT ) does get the expected value and clarifies what is happening on the right-hand-side. But of course OUTPUT is not then available where you need it... – Ed Randall Mar 26 '15 at 11:25

bash pattern to return both scalar and array value objects:

definition

url_parse() { # parse 'url' into: 'url_host', 'url_port', ...
   local "$@" # inject caller 'url' argument in local scope
   local url_host="..." url_path="..." # calculate 'url_*' components
   declare -p ${!url_*} # return only 'url_*' object fields to the caller
}

invocation

main() { # invoke url parser and inject 'url_*' results in local scope
   eval "$(url_parse url=http://host/path)" # parse 'url'
   echo "host=$url_host path=$url_path" # use 'url_*' components
}
agt@agtsoft:~/temp$ cat ./fc 
#!/bin/sh

fcall='function fcall { local res p=$1; shift; fname $*; eval "$p=$res"; }; fcall'

function f1 {
    res=$[($1+$2)*2];
}

function f2 {
    local a;
    eval ${fcall//fname/f1} a 2 3;
    echo f2:$a;
}

a=3;
f2;
echo after:a=$a, res=$res

agt@agtsoft:~/temp$ ./fc
f2:10
after:a=3, res=

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