888

I'm trying to find the proper way to define some components which could be used in a generic way:

<Parent>
  <Child value="1">
  <Child value="2">
</Parent>

There is a logic going on for rendering between parent and children components of course, you can imagine <select> and <option> as an example of this logic.

This is a dummy implementation for the purpose of the question:

var Parent = React.createClass({
  doSomething: function(value) {
  },
  render: function() {
    return (<div>{this.props.children}</div>);
  }
});

var Child = React.createClass({
  onClick: function() {
    this.props.doSomething(this.props.value); // doSomething is undefined
  },
  render: function() {
    return (<div onClick={this.onClick}></div>);
  }
});

The question is whenever you use {this.props.children} to define a wrapper component, how do you pass down some property to all its children?

24 Answers 24

955

Cloning children with new props

You can use React.Children to iterate over the children, and then clone each element with new props (shallow merged) using React.cloneElement e.g:

import React, { Children, isValidElement, cloneElement } from 'react';

const Child = ({ doSomething, value }) => (
  <div onClick={() => doSomething(value)}>Click Me</div>
);

function Parent({ children }) {
  function doSomething(value) {
    console.log('doSomething called by child with value:', value);
  }

  render() {
    const childrenWithProps = Children.map(children, child => {
      // Checking isValidElement is the safe way and avoids a TS error too.
      if (isValidElement(child)) {
        return cloneElement(child, { doSomething })
      }

      return child;
    });

    return <div>{childrenWithProps}</div>
  }
};

ReactDOM.render(
  <Parent>
    <Child value="1" />
    <Child value="2" />
  </Parent>,
  document.getElementById('container')
);

Fiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/2q294y43/2/

Calling children as a function

You can also pass props to children with render props. In this approach the children (which can be children or any other prop name) is a function which can accept any arguments you want to pass and returns the children:

const Child = ({ doSomething, value }) => (
  <div onClick={() =>  doSomething(value)}>Click Me</div>
);

function Parent({ children }) {
  function doSomething(value) {
    console.log('doSomething called by child with value:', value);
  }

  render() {
    // Note that children is called as a function and we can pass args to it
    return <div>{children(doSomething)}</div>
  }
};

ReactDOM.render(
  <Parent>
    {doSomething => (
      <React.Fragment>
        <Child doSomething={doSomething} value="1" />
        <Child doSomething={doSomething} value="2" />
      </React.Fragment>
    )}
  </Parent>,
  document.getElementById('container')
);

Instead of <React.Fragment> or simply <> you can also return an array if you prefer.

Fiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/ferahl/y5pcua68/7/

| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    This doesn't work for me. this is not defined within React.cloneElement() – Patrick Mar 8 '16 at 3:32
  • 12
    This answer doesn't work, the value passed to doSomething is lost. – Dave Mar 2 '17 at 23:03
  • 3
    @DominicTobias Arg, sorry, I switched console.log to alert and forgot to concat the two params to a single string. – Dave Mar 4 '17 at 16:03
  • 1
    This answer was super-helpful, but I ran into an issue that isn't mentioned here and I was wondering if it's some new thing that's changed or whether it's something odd on my end. When I cloned my child element, it's child was set to the old element, until I added this.props.children.props.children to the third argument of cloneElement. – aphenine Jul 6 '17 at 15:36
  • 7
    What if the child is loaded via a route (v4) thats loaded from a separate route page? – blamb Mar 13 '18 at 1:33
394

For a slightly cleaner way to do it, try:

<div>
    {React.cloneElement(this.props.children, { loggedIn: this.state.loggedIn })}
</div>

Edit: To use with multiple individual children (the child must itself be a component) you can do. Tested in 16.8.6

<div>
    {React.cloneElement(props.children[0], { loggedIn: true, testingTwo: true })}
    {React.cloneElement(props.children[1], { loggedIn: true, testProp: false })}
</div>
| improve this answer | |
  • 10
    I was using the most rated answer, but this one is much more straight forward! This solution is also what they use on the react-router examples page. – captDaylight Mar 9 '16 at 14:30
  • 10
    Could someone explain how this works (or what it actually does)? Reading the docs, I couldn't see how this would descend into the children and add that prop to each child - is that what it is intended to do? If it does, how do we know that this is what it will do? It's not at all obvious that it's even valid to pass an opaque data structure (this.props.children) to cloneElement ... which is expecting an ... element. – GreenAsJade Mar 28 '16 at 21:55
  • 51
    Exactly, this doesn't seem to work with more than one children. – Danita Mar 29 '16 at 12:22
  • 17
    So you can write code that works while someone passes only one child into a component, but when they add another, it crashes ... that doesn't sound great on face value? It would seem to be a trap for the OP, who asked specifically about passing props to all children. – GreenAsJade May 5 '16 at 12:23
  • 10
    @GreenAsJade its fine as long as your component is expecting a single child. You can define via your components propTypes that it expects a single child. React.Children.only function returns the only child or throws an exception if there are multiple (this wouldn't exist if there wasn't a use case). – cchamberlain May 5 '16 at 18:14
80

Try this

<div>{React.cloneElement(this.props.children, {...this.props})}</div>

It worked for me using react-15.1.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Is it possible to return React.cloneElement() directly without surrounding it in <div> tags? Because what if the child is a <span> (or something else) and we want to preserve its tag element type? – adrianmc Dec 17 '16 at 3:45
  • 1
    If it's one child you can leave out the wrapper and this solution only works for one child so yes. – ThaJay Mar 15 '17 at 11:48
  • 1
    Works for me. Without enclosing <div> is ok. – Crash Override May 8 '17 at 18:22
  • 4
    If you need to explicitly enforce that you only receive one child, you can do React.cloneElement(React.Children.only(this.props.children), {...this.props}) which will throw an error if it is passed more than one child. Then you don't need to wrap in a div. – itsananderson Aug 21 '17 at 22:05
  • 1
    This answer may produce a TypeError: cyclic object value. Unless you want one of the child's props to be itself, use let {children, ...acyclicalProps} = this.props and then React.cloneElement(React.Children.only(children), acyclicalProps). – Parabolord Jun 16 '18 at 18:57
68

Pass props to direct children.

See all other answers

Pass shared, global data through the component tree via context

Context is designed to share data that can be considered “global” for a tree of React components, such as the current authenticated user, theme, or preferred language. 1

Disclaimer: This is an updated answer, the previous one used the old context API

It is based on Consumer / Provide principle. First, create your context

const { Provider, Consumer } = React.createContext(defaultValue);

Then use via

<Provider value={/* some value */}>
  {children} /* potential consumers */
<Provider />

and

<Consumer>
  {value => /* render something based on the context value */}
</Consumer>

All Consumers that are descendants of a Provider will re-render whenever the Provider’s value prop changes. The propagation from Provider to its descendant Consumers is not subject to the shouldComponentUpdate method, so the Consumer is updated even when an ancestor component bails out of the update. 1

Full example, semi-pseudo code.

import React from 'react';

const { Provider, Consumer } = React.createContext({ color: 'white' });

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      value: { color: 'black' },
    };
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <Provider value={this.state.value}>
        <Toolbar />
      </Provider>
    );
  }
}

class Toolbar extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return ( 
      <div>
        <p> Consumer can be arbitrary levels deep </p>
        <Consumer> 
          {value => <p> The toolbar will be in color {value.color} </p>}
        </Consumer>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

1 https://facebook.github.io/react/docs/context.html

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    Unlike the accepted answer this will work properly even when there are other elements included under Parent. This is definitely the best answer. – Zaptree Sep 11 '16 at 23:36
  • 6
    Props != context – Petr Peller Dec 11 '16 at 19:14
  • you cannot depend on changes propagating through context. Use props when it's possible they change. – ThaJay Mar 15 '17 at 11:50
  • 1
    Maybe I don't understand but isn't it wrong to say "context makes props available"? When I last used context, it was a separate thing (i.e. this.context)--it didn't magically merge the context with props. You had to intentionally set and use the context, which is a whole other thing. – Josh Apr 21 '17 at 12:37
  • You understand perfectly, it was incorrect. I've edited my answer. – Lyubomir Apr 21 '17 at 12:43
48

Passing Props to Nested Children

With the update to React 16.6 you can now use React.createContext and contextType.

import * as React from 'react';

// React.createContext accepts a defaultValue as the first param
const MyContext = React.createContext(); 

class Parent extends React.Component {
  doSomething = (value) => {
    // Do something here with value
  };

  render() {
    return (
       <MyContext.Provider value={{ doSomething: this.doSomething }}>
         {this.props.children}
       </MyContext.Provider>
    );
  }
}

class Child extends React.Component {
  static contextType = MyContext;

  onClick = () => {
    this.context.doSomething(this.props.value);
  };      

  render() {
    return (
      <div onClick={this.onClick}>{this.props.value}</div>
    );
  }
}


// Example of using Parent and Child

import * as React from 'react';

class SomeComponent extends React.Component {

  render() {
    return (
      <Parent>
        <Child value={1} />
        <Child value={2} />
      </Parent>
    );
  }
}

React.createContext shines where React.cloneElement case couldn't handle nested components

class SomeComponent extends React.Component {

  render() {
    return (
      <Parent>
        <Child value={1} />
        <SomeOtherComp><Child value={2} /></SomeOtherComp>
      </Parent>
    );
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Can you explain why => functions are a bad practice? The => function helps bind the event handlers to get this context – Kenneth Truong Jun 18 '19 at 6:38
  • @KennethTruong because each time it renders it creates a function. – itdoesntwork Jul 11 '19 at 12:10
  • 9
    @itdoesntwork that's not true. It only creates a new function when the class is created. Its not being created during the render function.. – Kenneth Truong Jul 11 '19 at 18:02
  • @KennethTruong reactjs.org/docs/faq-functions.html#arrow-function-in-render i thought you were talking about arrow function in render. – itdoesntwork Jul 12 '19 at 8:18
24

You can use React.cloneElement, it's better to know how it works before you start using it in your application. It's introduced in React v0.13, read on for more information, so something along with this work for you:

<div>{React.cloneElement(this.props.children, {...this.props})}</div>

So bring the lines from React documentation for you to understand how it's all working and how you can make use of them:

In React v0.13 RC2 we will introduce a new API, similar to React.addons.cloneWithProps, with this signature:

React.cloneElement(element, props, ...children);

Unlike cloneWithProps, this new function does not have any magic built-in behavior for merging style and className for the same reason we don't have that feature from transferPropsTo. Nobody is sure what exactly the complete list of magic things are, which makes it difficult to reason about the code and difficult to reuse when style has a different signature (e.g. in the upcoming React Native).

React.cloneElement is almost equivalent to:

<element.type {...element.props} {...props}>{children}</element.type>

However, unlike JSX and cloneWithProps, it also preserves refs. This means that if you get a child with a ref on it, you won't accidentally steal it from your ancestor. You will get the same ref attached to your new element.

One common pattern is to map over your children and add a new prop. There were many issues reported about cloneWithProps losing the ref, making it harder to reason about your code. Now following the same pattern with cloneElement will work as expected. For example:

var newChildren = React.Children.map(this.props.children, function(child) {
  return React.cloneElement(child, { foo: true })
});

Note: React.cloneElement(child, { ref: 'newRef' }) DOES override the ref so it is still not possible for two parents to have a ref to the same child, unless you use callback-refs.

This was a critical feature to get into React 0.13 since props are now immutable. The upgrade path is often to clone the element, but by doing so you might lose the ref. Therefore, we needed a nicer upgrade path here. As we were upgrading callsites at Facebook we realized that we needed this method. We got the same feedback from the community. Therefore we decided to make another RC before the final release to make sure we get this in.

We plan to eventually deprecate React.addons.cloneWithProps. We're not doing it yet, but this is a good opportunity to start thinking about your own uses and consider using React.cloneElement instead. We'll be sure to ship a release with deprecation notices before we actually remove it so no immediate action is necessary.

more here...

| improve this answer | |
18

The best way, which allows you to make property transfer is children like a function

Example:

export const GrantParent = () => {
  return (
    <Parent>
      {props => (
        <ChildComponent {...props}>
          Bla-bla-bla
        </ChildComponent>
      )}
    </Parent>
  )
}

export const Parent = ({ children }) => {
    const somePropsHere = { //...any }
    <>
        {children(somePropsHere)}
    </>
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This seems way more straightforward (and better for performance?) to me than the accepted answer. – Shikyo Mar 3 '19 at 6:22
  • 2
    This requires children to be a function and does not work for deply nested components – digital illusion Apr 30 '19 at 8:47
  • @digitalillusion, I don't understand what does it mean nested components. React doesn't have nested patterns, only compositions. Yes, children must be a function, there is no any conflicts, because this's valid JSX child. Can you give an example with nesting components ? – Nick Ovchinnikov May 1 '19 at 9:09
  • 1
    You are right the case of deeply nested children can be handled as well <Parent>{props => <Nest><ChildComponent /></Nest>}</Parent> instead of (not working) <Parent><Nest>{props => <ChildComponent />}</Nest></Parent> so I agree this is the best answer – digital illusion May 2 '19 at 9:33
  • When attempting, I receive the following: TypeError: children is not a function – Ryan Prentiss Oct 30 '19 at 7:15
6

I needed to fix accepted answer above to make it work using that instead of this pointer. This within the scope of map function didn't have doSomething function defined.

var Parent = React.createClass({
doSomething: function() {
    console.log('doSomething!');
},

render: function() {
    var that = this;
    var childrenWithProps = React.Children.map(this.props.children, function(child) {
        return React.cloneElement(child, { doSomething: that.doSomething });
    });

    return <div>{childrenWithProps}</div>
}})

Update: this fix is for ECMAScript 5, in ES6 there is no need in var that=this

| improve this answer | |
  • 13
    or just use bind() – plus- Jan 4 '16 at 10:17
  • 1
    or use an arrow function which binds to lexical scope, I updated my answer – Dominic Jan 22 '16 at 9:39
  • what if doSomething took an object, like doSomething: function(obj) { console.log(obj) } and in the Child you'd call this.props.doSomething(obj) to log out "obj" – conor909 Apr 10 '16 at 9:39
  • 4
    @plus- i know this is old, but using bind here is a terrible idea, bind creates a new function that binds the context to a new one. basically a function calling the apply method. using bind() in the render function will create a new function each time the render method is called. – Bamieh Nov 20 '16 at 13:38
6

Cleaner way considering one or more children

<div>
   { React.Children.map(this.props.children, child => React.cloneElement(child, {...this.props}))}
</div>
| improve this answer | |
  • This one doesn't work for me, it gives an error: children not defined. – Deelux Nov 27 '16 at 9:05
  • @Deelux this.props.children instead of children – Martin Dawson Dec 15 '16 at 20:05
  • this passes the child as its own children in this.props. In general I'd only recommend cloning with specific props, not the whole shebang. – Andy Nov 2 '17 at 6:21
  • Passing {...this.props} didn't work for me, is the way {...child.props} correct? – Felipe Augusto Jul 6 '18 at 7:11
  • For functional components: React.Children.map(children, child => React.cloneElement(child, props)) – vsync yesterday
5

None of the answers address the issue of having children that are NOT React components, such as text strings. A workaround could be something like this:

// Render method of Parent component
render(){
    let props = {
        setAlert : () => {alert("It works")}
    };
    let childrenWithProps = React.Children.map( this.props.children, function(child) {
        if (React.isValidElement(child)){
            return React.cloneElement(child, props);
        }
          return child;
      });
    return <div>{childrenWithProps}</div>

}
| improve this answer | |
5

You no longer need {this.props.children}. Now you can wrap your child component using render in Route and pass your props as usual:

<BrowserRouter>
  <div>
    <ul>
      <li><Link to="/">Home</Link></li>
      <li><Link to="/posts">Posts</Link></li>
      <li><Link to="/about">About</Link></li>
    </ul>

    <hr/>

    <Route path="/" exact component={Home} />
    <Route path="/posts" render={() => (
      <Posts
        value1={1}
        value2={2}
        data={this.state.data}
      />
    )} />
    <Route path="/about" component={About} />
  </div>
</BrowserRouter>
| improve this answer | |
4

Parent.jsx:

import React from 'react';

const doSomething = value => {};

const Parent = props => (
  <div>
    {
      !props || !props.children 
        ? <div>Loading... (required at least one child)</div>
        : !props.children.length 
            ? <props.children.type {...props.children.props} doSomething={doSomething} {...props}>{props.children}</props.children.type>
            : props.children.map((child, key) => 
              React.cloneElement(child, {...props, key, doSomething}))
    }
  </div>
);

Child.jsx:

import React from 'react';

/* but better import doSomething right here,
   or use some flux store (for example redux library) */
export default ({ doSomething, value }) => (
  <div onClick={() => doSomething(value)}/>
);

and main.jsx:

import React from 'react';
import { render } from 'react-dom';
import Parent from './Parent';
import Child from './Child';

render(
  <Parent>
    <Child/>
    <Child value='1'/>
    <Child value='2'/>
  </Parent>,
  document.getElementById('...')
);

see example here: https://plnkr.co/edit/jJHQECrKRrtKlKYRpIWl?p=preview

| improve this answer | |
4

Maybe you can also find useful this feature, though many people have considered this as an anti-pattern it still can be used if you're know what you're doing and design your solution well.

Function as Child Components

| improve this answer | |
4

If you have multiple children you want to pass props to, you can do it this way, using the React.Children.map:

render() {
    let updatedChildren = React.Children.map(this.props.children,
        (child) => {
            return React.cloneElement(child, { newProp: newProp });
        });

    return (
        <div>
            { updatedChildren }
        </div>
    );
}

If your component is having just one child, there's no need for mapping, you can just cloneElement straight away:

render() {
    return (
        <div>
            {
                React.cloneElement(this.props.children, {
                    newProp: newProp
                })
            }
        </div>
    );
}
| improve this answer | |
3

According to the documentation of cloneElement()

React.cloneElement(
  element,
  [props],
  [...children]
)

Clone and return a new React element using element as the starting point. The resulting element will have the original element’s props with the new props merged in shallowly. New children will replace existing children. key and ref from the original element will be preserved.

React.cloneElement() is almost equivalent to:

<element.type {...element.props} {...props}>{children}</element.type>

However, it also preserves refs. This means that if you get a child with a ref on it, you won’t accidentally steal it from your ancestor. You will get the same ref attached to your new element.

So cloneElement is what you would use to provide custom props to the children. However there can be multiple children in the component and you would need to loop over it. What other answers suggest is for you to map over them using React.Children.map. However React.Children.map unlike React.cloneElement changes the keys of the Element appending and extra .$ as the prefix. Check this question for more details: React.cloneElement inside React.Children.map is causing element keys to change

If you wish to avoid it, you should instead go for the forEach function like

render() {
    const newElements = [];
    React.Children.forEach(this.props.children, 
              child => newElements.push(
                 React.cloneElement(
                   child, 
                   {...this.props, ...customProps}
                )
              )
    )
    return (
        <div>{newElements}</div>
    )

}
| improve this answer | |
2

Further to @and_rest answer, this is how I clone the children and add a class.

<div className="parent">
    {React.Children.map(this.props.children, child => React.cloneElement(child, {className:'child'}))}
</div>
| improve this answer | |
2

I think a render prop is the appropriate way to handle this scenario

You let the Parent provide the necessary props used in child component, by refactoring the Parent code to look to something like this:

const Parent = ({children}) => {
  const doSomething(value) => {}

  return children({ doSomething })
}

Then in the child Component you can access the function provided by the parent this way:

class Child extends React {

  onClick() => { this.props.doSomething }

  render() { 
    return (<div onClick={this.onClick}></div>);
  }

}

Now the fianl stucture will look like this:

<Parent>
  {(doSomething) =>
   (<Fragment>
     <Child value="1" doSomething={doSomething}>
     <Child value="2" doSomething={doSomething}>
    <Fragment />
   )}
</Parent>
| improve this answer | |
2

Method 1 - clone children

const Parent = (props) => {
   const attributeToAddOrReplace= "Some Value"
   const childrenWithAdjustedProps = React.Children.map(props.children, child =>
      React.cloneElement(child, { attributeToAddOrReplace})
   );

   return <div>{childrenWithAdjustedProps }</div>
}

Method 2 - use composable context

Context allows you to pass a prop to a deep child component without explicitly passing it as a prop through the components in between.

Context comes with drawbacks:

  1. Data doesn't flow in the regular way - via props.
  2. Using context creates a contract between the consumer and the provider. It might be more difficult to understand and replicate the requirements needed to reuse a component.

Using a composable context

export const Context = createContext<any>(null);

export const ComposableContext = ({ children, ...otherProps }:{children:ReactNode, [x:string]:any}) => {
    const context = useContext(Context)
    return(
      <Context.Provider {...context} value={{...context, ...otherProps}}>{children}</Context.Provider>
    );
}

function App() {
  return (
      <Provider1>
            <Provider2> 
                <Displayer />
            </Provider2>
      </Provider1>
  );
}

const Provider1 =({children}:{children:ReactNode}) => (
    <ComposableContext greeting="Hello">{children}</ComposableContext>
)

const Provider2 =({children}:{children:ReactNode}) => (
    <ComposableContext name="world">{children}</ComposableContext>
)

const Displayer = () => {
  const context = useContext(Context);
  return <div>{context.greeting}, {context.name}</div>;
};

| improve this answer | |
  • A bit late, but could you explain the notation in {children}:{children:ReactNode}? – camille Mar 21 at 18:23
  • @camille, It's a Typescript thing. Looking at it now, I would just answer with Javascript, and even if I would write Typescript, I'd do it differently. Might edit it in the future. – Ben Carp Mar 22 at 13:44
  • 1
    @camille, basically it means that the value which has the key "children" is of type ReactNode – Ben Carp Mar 22 at 13:45
1

The slickest way to do this:

    {React.cloneElement(this.props.children, this.props)}
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    Does this not copy this.props.children into this.props.children of the child? and in effect copying the child into itself? – Arshabh Agarwal Sep 10 '16 at 15:48
1

For any one who has a single child element this should do it.

{React.isValidElement(this.props.children)
                  ? React.cloneElement(this.props.children, {
                      ...prop_you_want_to_pass
                    })
                  : null}
| improve this answer | |
0

Is this what you required?

var Parent = React.createClass({
  doSomething: function(value) {
  }
  render: function() {
    return  <div>
              <Child doSome={this.doSomething} />
            </div>
  }
})

var Child = React.createClass({
  onClick:function() {
    this.props.doSome(value); // doSomething is undefined
  },  
  render: function() {
    return  <div onClick={this.onClick}></div>
  }
})
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Nope, I don't want to constraint the content of my wrapper to some specific content. – plus- Sep 3 '15 at 9:02
0

Some reason React.children was not working for me. This is what worked for me.

I wanted to just add a class to the child. similar to changing a prop

 var newChildren = this.props.children.map((child) => {
 const className = "MenuTooltip-item " + child.props.className;
    return React.cloneElement(child, { className });
 });

 return <div>{newChildren}</div>;

The trick here is the React.cloneElement. You can pass any prop in a similar manner

| improve this answer | |
0

Render props is most accurate approach to this problem. Instead of passing the child component to parent component as children props, let parent render child component manually. Render is built-in props in react, which takes function parameter. In this function you can let parent component render whatever you want with custom parameters. Basically it does the same thing as child props but it is more customizable.

class Child extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <div className="Child">
      Child
      <p onClick={this.props.doSomething}>Click me</p>
           {this.props.a}
    </div>;
  }
}

class Parent extends React.Component {
  doSomething(){
   alert("Parent talks"); 
  }

  render() {
    return <div className="Parent">
      Parent
      {this.props.render({
        anythingToPassChildren:1, 
        doSomething: this.doSomething})}
    </div>;
  }
}

class Application extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <div>
      <Parent render={
          props => <Child {...props} />
        }/>
    </div>;
  }
}

Example at codepen

| improve this answer | |
0

When using functional components, you will often get the TypeError: Cannot add property myNewProp, object is not extensible error when trying to set new properties on props.children. There is a work around to this by cloning the props and then cloning the child itself with the new props.

const MyParentComponent = (props) => {
  return (
    <div className='whatever'>
      {props.children.map((child) => {
        const newProps = { ...child.props }
        // set new props here on newProps
        newProps.myNewProp = 'something'
        const preparedChild = { ...child, props: newProps }
        return preparedChild
      })}
    </div>
  )
}
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.