-4

Anyone knows how to run this program using 4 variables only? I tried using 1 variable for min and max "lowhigh" but I was having a hard time figuring out where to put the statements.

    int numbers[] = new int[5];
    int low = 0; int high = 0; 

    for(int count = 0; count < numbers.length; count++){            

     System.out.print("Please enter a number: ");
        int number=s.nextInt();

        if (count == 0) {
            low = number;
            high=number;
        } else {
            if(number < high) {
                high= number;        
            }
            if(number > low){
                low = number;

            }

        }

        numbers[count] = number;
    }
    double ave = numbers[0]+numbers[1]+numbers[2]+numbers[3]+numbers[4]/5;
    System.out.println("Highest: " +high);
    System.out.println("Lowest: " +low);
    System.out.println("The average of all number is: " +ave); }}
5
  • Your average is not calculated correctly. Your conditionals are backwards.
    – matt
    Sep 3, 2015 at 17:46
  • You don't need number or ave. Use numbers[count] instead of number, and use the expression for the average directly instead of storing its value in a variable. Do get the expression correct, though -- yours is wrong for at least two separate reasons. Sep 3, 2015 at 17:46
  • If this is a homework assignment described only as "calculate Min/Max/Average using only 4 variables", my take would be variables named min, max, sum, count. --- Eh, I might be wrong.
    – Andreas
    Sep 3, 2015 at 17:54
  • 1
    The question, as is, is half excellent (you showing what you tried) and half awful (you don't clearly define what the actual goal and/or constraints are).
    – Durandal
    Sep 3, 2015 at 17:54
  • Thank you everyone for the responses. I didn't expect people will come here and help me. Sep 4, 2015 at 11:03

5 Answers 5

4

Another way to do it in Java 8.

int numbers[] = new int[5];
    
for(int count = 0; count < numbers.length; count++){
    System.out.print("Please enter a number: ");
    int number=s.nextInt();
    numbers[count] = number;
}

LongSummaryStatistics statistics = Arrays.stream(numbers)
    .asLongStream()
    .summaryStatistics();

System.out.println("Highest: " + statistics.getMax());
System.out.println("Lowest: " + statistics.getMin());
System.out.println("The average of all number is: " + statistics.getAverage());
1

Looks like your logic is backwards to finding high and low. Also your average wont work because order of operations. Need parens

int numbers[] = new int[5];
int low = Integer.MAX_VALUE; int high = Integer.MIN_VALUE; 

for(int count = 0; count < numbers.length; count++){            

 System.out.print("Please enter a number: ");
    int number=s.nextInt();

    if (count == 0) {
        low = number;
        high=number;
    } else {
        if(number > high) {
            high= number;        
        }
        if(number < low){
            low = number;

        }

    }

    numbers[count] = number;
}
double ave = (numbers[0]+numbers[1]+numbers[2]+numbers[3]+numbers[4])/5;
System.out.println("Highest: " +high);
System.out.println("Lowest: " +low);
System.out.println("The average of all number is: " +ave); }}
1
  • You are quite right, but you have not addressed the actual question, which is about reducing the number of variables used. Sep 3, 2015 at 17:48
0

You don't have to use an array if all you're doing is finding the min, max and mean.

final int COUNT = 5; //this is just to be neat, and not needed as a variable.
int low = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
int high = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
int sum = 0;    

for(int i = 0; i < COUNT; i++){
    int n = s.nextInt();//or whatever

    if(n > high)
        high = n;
    if(n < low)
        low = n;

    sum += n;
}

System.out.println("Max: " + high);
System.out.println("Min: " + low);
System.out.println("Average: " + ((double) sum) / COUNT);

Based on what you mean by 4 variables, this may or may not work. final int COUNT is not really required and 5 can be put in directly instead.

4
  • With a very strict interpretation of "4 variables", you're using 7: COUNT, low, high, sum, i, n, s. Note that s is a variable, even if not defined in the code snippet. ;-)
    – Andreas
    Sep 3, 2015 at 18:21
  • @Andreas COUNT is final so I'd consider it a constant. Scanner might not count (it could be an argument to a method). But that still leaves at least 5 :)
    – Durandal
    Sep 3, 2015 at 18:52
  • @Durandal Yeah, I thought about the argument of parameter vs variable. If distinct, you could reduce variable count using recursion, since everything becomes parameters.
    – Andreas
    Sep 3, 2015 at 18:54
  • @Andreas Somehow I doubt that even the one who thought up the question (I mean the teacher) has thought that far. But alas unless the OP posts the original requirements we will never know.
    – Durandal
    Sep 3, 2015 at 18:59
0

This answer likely goes well beyond the scope of the question, but since the requirements/restrictions are not listed in full, it may still be a valid answer.

With a super strict interpretation of "4 variables", even the Scanner variable s counts.

Using streams, it can be done with 3 variables:

Scanner s;           // variable 1
List<Double> values; // variable 2
String line;         // variable 3

s = new Scanner(System.in);
values = new ArrayList<>();
while (true) {
    System.out.print("Please enter a numbers, or press enter when done: ");
    if ((line = s.nextLine().trim()).isEmpty())
        break;
    values.add(Double.valueOf(line));
}
if (values.isEmpty())
    return;
System.out.println("Minimum: " + Stream.of(values.toArray(new Double[values.size()]))
                                       .mapToDouble(Double::valueOf)
                                       .min().getAsDouble());
System.out.println("Maximum: " + Stream.of(values.toArray(new Double[values.size()]))
                                       .mapToDouble(Double::valueOf)
                                       .max().getAsDouble());
System.out.println("Average: " + Stream.of(values.toArray(new Double[values.size()]))
                                       .mapToDouble(Double::valueOf)
                                       .sum() / values.size());

Sample output

Please enter a numbers, or press enter when done: 10
Please enter a numbers, or press enter when done: 42
Please enter a numbers, or press enter when done: 19
Please enter a numbers, or press enter when done: 88
Please enter a numbers, or press enter when done: 1
Please enter a numbers, or press enter when done: 3774
Please enter a numbers, or press enter when done: 
Minimum: 1.0
Maximum: 3774.0
Average: 655.6666666666666
4
  • 1
    You could get away without the line variable if you can lower yourself enough to use the exception thrown by Double.valueOf() for loop control XD Although the exception itself could be counted as a variable, too...
    – Durandal
    Sep 3, 2015 at 19:02
  • @Durandal Very true, as long as error handling is not required, since bad input will just stop the loop silently. I know the (very minimal) requirements don't state error handling, I just consider that a defacto requirement unless otherwise stated. Is that wrong? --- In this code, error handling is the program ending, saying you did wrong. One way to handle error, though not optimal.
    – Andreas
    Sep 3, 2015 at 19:05
  • I'm a little bitter and cynical about error handling - probably because where I work I constantly get requirements that don't ever say anything about exceptional cases (ME: How do we count when that field is null? PHB: That never happens! ME: It does happen quite often because its nullable in the database. PHB: But my workflow requires the field to be entered. ME: But workflows X, Y and Z do not. And neither does the UI. PHB: Well then ... do something! ...... PHB (later): It does not calculate as I wanted it!). Sad but true.
    – Durandal
    Sep 3, 2015 at 19:30
  • @Durandal Oh yes, I'm with you on that. Customers, well Users (and PHB's though I'm lucky to not have one of those), are very narrow-scoped and unstructured, and their "never happens" assertion is very often wrong. Had a customer say "we'll figure it out when it happens", but we had to code the logic for handling it now. <pulls hair>
    – Andreas
    Sep 3, 2015 at 20:33
0

There is no point in the numbers[] array; so eliminate that.

You need a control variable for the loop, a temporary storage for the input, then three running variables for min, max and sum (average is sum devided by count, which seems to be fixed to 5).

Thats 5 variables, and you strictly need all of them. Its possible to stuff multiple values into a single variable, but I highly doubt thats what you're supposed to do.

Depending on what the requirements really are (I presume this is homework), one of the five I named above doesn't count as a variable per requirement (most likely the loop control or the temporary input storage).

Edit: Here's a variant using multiple values encoded in one variable that works with three variables (or four if you count the scanner, which I replaced with random for my convinience):

public class HighLowAverage {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        long sum = 0;
        long highLow = 0x8000_0000_7FFF_FFFFL;
        long countNumber = 0;
        for (; (countNumber >> 32) < 5; countNumber += 0x1_0000_0000L) {
            countNumber = (countNumber & 0xFFFF_FFFF_0000_0000L) 
                    | ((int) (Math.random() * 100) & 0xFFFF_FFFFL);
            System.out.println(((countNumber >> 32) + 1) + ". number is: " + (int) countNumber);
            sum += (int) countNumber;
            if ((highLow >> 32) < (int) countNumber)
                highLow = (highLow & 0xFFFF_FFFFL) | (countNumber << 32);
            if (((int) highLow) > (int) countNumber)
                highLow = (highLow & 0xFFFF_FFFF_0000_0000L) | (countNumber & 0xFFFF_FFFFL);
        }
        System.out.println("Average: " + ((double) sum) / (countNumber >> 32));
        System.out.println("Min: " + (int) highLow);
        System.out.println("Max: " + (highLow >> 32));
    }

}

The techniques used are bit-shifting and masking to use the upper/lower half of the long datatype as independendly accessible values. Note amount of complicated expressions necessary as well as the numerous constansts in the expressions plus typecasts almost everywhere.

This is code you should never ever use - it works, but even an experienced programmer will need an excessive amount of thinking to figure out if its working correctly. My guess is that a typical beginner class teacher will have trouble understanding it at all.

Edit2: Scratch the above, it can be done with one variable. How? By replacing multiple variables with an array:

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        long[] vars = new long[5];
        vars[1] = Long.MIN_VALUE;
        vars[2] = Long.MAX_VALUE;
        for (vars[0] = 0; vars[0] < 5; ++vars[0]) {
            vars[4] = (int) (Math.random() * 100);
            System.out.println((vars[0] + 1) + ". number is: " + vars[4]);
            vars[3] += vars[4];
            if (vars[4] > vars[1])
                vars[1] = vars[4];
            if (vars[4] < vars[2])
                vars[2] = vars[4];
        }
        System.out.println("Average: " + ((double) vars[3]) / vars[0]);
        System.out.println("Min: " + vars[1]);
        System.out.println("Max: " + vars[2]);
    }

Needless to say thats still confusing code. Each index of the vars array is used to hold one of the variables (0 = loop control, 1 = min, 2 = max, 3 = sum, 4 = number).

You see it all depends on what is considered a variable.

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