15

I am trying to use a migrations.RunSQL Django migration to run some arbitrary SQL code. I would like to run this migration for only certain db backends (for example only for postgres).

I would think to use something like this but I don't see the DB connection info in the Migration class.

11

Here is how I solved the problem since I couldn't get RunSQL to work inside RunPython. Thankfully, the schema_editor object has an execute() method.

def forwards(apps, schema_editor):
    if not schema_editor.connection.vendor.startswith('postgres'):
        logger.info('Database vendor: {}'.format(schema_editor.connection.vendor))
        logger.info('Skipping migration without attempting to ADD CONSTRAINT')
        return

    schema_editor.execute('ALTER TABLE my_table ADD CONSTRAINT my_constraint (my_field != \'NaN\';)')


def backwards(apps, schema_editor):
    if not schema_editor.connection.vendor.startswith('postgres'):
        logger.info('Database vendor: {}'.format(schema_editor.connection.vendor))
        logger.info('Skipping migration without attempting to DROP CONSTRAINT')
        return

    schema_editor.execute('ALTER TABLE my_table DROP CONSTRAINT my_constraint;')


class Migration(migrations.Migration):

    dependencies = [
        ...
    ]

    operations = [
        migrations.RunPython(forwards, backwards, atomic=True)
    ]
|improve this answer|||||
  • This worked for me, except I need to have atomic=False – kzh Jan 12 '18 at 16:53
  • Be careful with atomic=False. If some actions succeed and others fail, your database could end up in an inconsistent state. – PaulMest Jan 12 '18 at 21:05
  • Django would refuse to run it for me otherwise. – kzh Jan 12 '18 at 21:07
  • The atomic=False has to be used at least on MySQL and Oracle, see docs.djangoproject.com/en/3.0/ref/migration-operations/… – Michal Čihař Mar 9 at 14:10
6

I just had the same need. I had to edit a migration that set the initial value of a sequence, which works on postgres but not sqlite. Here's how I wrapped the RunSQL inside a RunPython, following the documentation that Daniel linked to.

from django.db import migrations


def forwards(apps, schema_editor):
    if not schema_editor.connection.vendor == 'postgres':
        return
    migrations.RunSQL(
        "alter sequence api_consumer_id_seq restart with 1000500;")


class Migration(migrations.Migration):
    dependencies = [
        ('api', '0043_auto_20160416_2313'),
    ]

    operations = [
        migrations.RunPython(forwards),
    ]
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    My vendor string was postgresql and not postgres (in Django 1.10.6) – James Hiew May 11 '17 at 9:14
  • 2
    The problem with this is that migrations.RunSQL() returns an object. It doesn't actually execute any SQL until that object's _run_sql() method is called with certain parameters. See PaulMest's response for a solution that also uses the migrations.RunPython() method but executes SQL in a way that actually executes SQL. – radicalbiscuit Feb 17 '18 at 21:38
4

I solved a similar problem today -- needing to perform a migration to create a new model, but only for a postgres DB -- and I found this question. However, Matthew's answer did not help me. In fact, I'm not sure it works at all. That is because the line with migrations.RunSQL(...) does not actually run SQL; it creates a new object of type RunSQL which is a Command, and then immediately discards it.

Here's how I ended up solving the problem, in case anyone tries to search for "django conditional migration" in the future:

from __future__ import unicode_literals

import django.contrib.postgres.fields
from django.db import migrations, models


class PostgresOnlyCreateModel(migrations.CreateModel):
    def database_forwards(self, app_label, schema_editor, from_state, to_state):
        if schema_editor.connection.vendor.startswith("postgres"):
            super(PostgresOnlyCreateModel, self).database_forwards(app_label, schema_editor, from_state, to_state)

    def database_backwards(self, app_label, schema_editor, from_state, to_state):
        if schema_editor.connection.vendor.startswith("postgres"):
            super(PostgresOnlyCreateModel, self).database_backwards(app_label, schema_editor, from_state, to_state)


class Migration(migrations.Migration):

    dependencies = [
        ...whatever...
    ]

    operations = [
        PostgresOnlyCreateModel(
            name='...whatever...',
            fields=[...whatever...],
        ),
    ]
|improve this answer|||||
0

That information is not provided in the Migration class, it is provided in the schema_editor attribute passed to a RunPython operation. See the documentation for some examples on using this.

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.