38

I'm running my tests using gradle testFlavorType

JSONObject jsonObject1 = new JSONObject();
JSONObject jsonObject2 = new JSONObject();
jsonObject1.put("test", "test");
jsonObject2.put("test", "test");
assertEquals(jsonObject1.get("test"), jsonObject2.get("test"));

The above test succeeds.

jsonObject = new SlackMessageRequest(channel, message).buildBody();
String channelAssertion = jsonObject.getString(SlackMessageRequest.JSON_KEY_CHANNEL);
String messageAssertion = jsonObject.getString(SlackMessageRequest.JSON_KEY_TEXT);
assertEquals(channel, channelAssertion);
assertEquals(message, messageAssertion);

But the above two requests fail. The stack trace says that channelAssertion and messageAssertion are null, but not sure why. My question is: Why are the above two asserts failing?

Below is the SlackMessageRequest.

public class SlackMessageRequest
        extends BaseRequest {
    // region Variables

    public static final String JSON_KEY_TEXT = "text";
    public static final String JSON_KEY_CHANNEL = "channel";

    private String mChannel;
    private String mMessage;

    // endregion

    // region Constructors

    public SlackMessageRequest(String channel, String message) {
        mChannel = channel;
        mMessage = message;
    }

    // endregion

    // region Methods

    @Override
    public MethodType getMethodType() {
        return MethodType.POST;
    }    

    @Override
    public JSONObject buildBody() throws JSONException {
        JSONObject body = new JSONObject();
        body.put(JSON_KEY_TEXT, getMessage());
        body.put(JSON_KEY_CHANNEL, getChannel());
        return body;
    }

    @Override
    public String getUrl() {
        return "http://localhost:1337";
    }

    public String getMessage() {
        return mMessage;
    }

    public String getChannel() {
        return mChannel;
    }

// endregion
}

Below is the stacktrace:

junit.framework.ComparisonFailure: expected:<@tk> but was:<null>
    at junit.framework.Assert.assertEquals(Assert.java:100)
    at junit.framework.Assert.assertEquals(Assert.java:107)
    at junit.framework.TestCase.assertEquals(TestCase.java:269)
    at com.example.app.http.request.SlackMessageRequestTest.testBuildBody(SlackMessageRequestTest.java:30)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:62)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:483)
    at junit.framework.TestCase.runTest(TestCase.java:176)
    at junit.framework.TestCase.runBare(TestCase.java:141)
    at junit.framework.TestResult$1.protect(TestResult.java:122)
    at junit.framework.TestResult.runProtected(TestResult.java:142)
    at junit.framework.TestResult.run(TestResult.java:125)
    at junit.framework.TestCase.run(TestCase.java:129)
    at junit.framework.TestSuite.runTest(TestSuite.java:252)
    at junit.framework.TestSuite.run(TestSuite.java:247)
    at org.junit.internal.runners.JUnit38ClassRunner.run(JUnit38ClassRunner.java:86)
    at org.gradle.api.internal.tasks.testing.junit.JUnitTestClassExecuter.runTestClass(JUnitTestClassExecuter.java:86)
    at org.gradle.api.internal.tasks.testing.junit.JUnitTestClassExecuter.execute(JUnitTestClassExecuter.java:49)
    at org.gradle.api.internal.tasks.testing.junit.JUnitTestClassProcessor.processTestClass(JUnitTestClassProcessor.java:64)
    at org.gradle.api.internal.tasks.testing.SuiteTestClassProcessor.processTestClass(SuiteTestClassProcessor.java:50)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:62)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:483)
    at org.gradle.messaging.dispatch.ReflectionDispatch.dispatch(ReflectionDispatch.java:35)
    at org.gradle.messaging.dispatch.ReflectionDispatch.dispatch(ReflectionDispatch.java:24)
    at org.gradle.messaging.dispatch.ContextClassLoaderDispatch.dispatch(ContextClassLoaderDispatch.java:32)
    at org.gradle.messaging.dispatch.ProxyDispatchAdapter$DispatchingInvocationHandler.invoke(ProxyDispatchAdapter.java:93)
    at com.sun.proxy.$Proxy2.processTestClass(Unknown Source)
    at org.gradle.api.internal.tasks.testing.worker.TestWorker.processTestClass(TestWorker.java:106)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:62)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:483)
    at org.gradle.messaging.dispatch.ReflectionDispatch.dispatch(ReflectionDispatch.java:35)
    at org.gradle.messaging.dispatch.ReflectionDispatch.dispatch(ReflectionDispatch.java:24)
    at org.gradle.messaging.remote.internal.hub.MessageHub$Handler.run(MessageHub.java:360)
    at org.gradle.internal.concurrent.DefaultExecutorFactory$StoppableExecutorImpl$1.run(DefaultExecutorFactory.java:64)
    at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.runWorker(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:1142)
    at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:617)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:745)

EDIT 5:55PM EST

I've figured out that I can log with System.out.println("") and then see the results by running gradle testFlavorType --debug and by trial and error I've discovered the following weird situation:

@Override
public JSONObject buildBody() throws JSONException {
    System.out.println("buildBody mChannel = " + mChannel);
    System.out.println("buildBody mMessage = " + mMessage);
    JSONObject body = new JSONObject();
    body.put(JSON_KEY_TEXT, getMessage());
    body.put(JSON_KEY_CHANNEL, getChannel());

    if (body.length() != 0) {
        Iterator<String> keys = body.keys();

        if (keys.hasNext()) {
            do {
                String key = keys.next();
                System.out.println("keys: " + key);
            } while (keys.hasNext());
        }
    } else {
        System.out.println("There are no keys????");
    }

    return body;
}

For some reason, "There are no keys????" is printing out?!?!?!?! Why?!

EDIT 6:20PM EST

I've figured out how to debug unit tests. According to the debugger, the assigned JSONObject is returning "null". I have no clue what this means (see below). Since I think this is relevant, my gradle file includes the following:

testOptions {
    unitTests.returnDefaultValues = true
}

It's especially strange because if I construct a JSONObject inside the test, then everything works fine. But if it is part of the original application's code, then it doesn't work and does the above.

enter image description here

  • Please add the stack trace. – Zoltán Sep 3 '15 at 21:06
  • @Zoltán, I have added the stack trace. – tambykojak Sep 3 '15 at 21:11
  • That used to work, but seems that it has to be run under instrumentation artifact now. – mbmc Nov 11 '15 at 20:47
47

The class JSONObject is part of the android SDK. That means that is not available for unit testing by default.

From http://tools.android.com/tech-docs/unit-testing-support

The android.jar file that is used to run unit tests does not contain any actual code - that is provided by the Android system image on real devices. Instead, all methods throw exceptions (by default). This is to make sure your unit tests only test your code and do not depend on any particular behaviour of the Android platform (that you have not explicitly mocked e.g. using Mockito).

When you set the test options to

testOptions {
    unitTests.returnDefaultValues = true
}

you are fixing the "Method ... not mocked." problem, but the outcome is that when your code uses new JSONObject() you are not using the real method, you are using a mock method that doesn't do anything, it just returns a default value. That's the reason the object is null.

You can find different ways of solving the problem in this question: Android methods are not mocked when using Mockito

56

As Lucas says, JSON is bundled up with the Android SDK, so you are working with a stub.

The current solution is to pull JSON from Maven Central like this:

dependencies {
    ...
    testCompile 'org.json:json:20180130'
}

Alternatively, you can download and include the jar:

dependencies {
    ...
    testCompile files('libs/json.jar')
}

It is not known which version of the maven artifact corresponds exactly/most closely to what ships with Android.

Note that you also need to use Android Studio 1.1 or higher and at least build tools version 22.0.0 or above for this to work.

Related issue: #179461

  • 1
    This no longer works for me. It did on an old project, but now I'm still getting null when trying to create a new JSONObject. I'm using testCompile 'org.json:json:20160810'. I also tried configurations.all { resolutionStrategy.force 'org.json:json:20160810' }, but no luck. Any ideas? – AutonomousApps Jan 18 '17 at 1:33
  • I just found this in my gradle output: WARNING: Dependency org.json:json:20160810 is ignored for flavorDebug as it may be conflicting with the internal version provided by Android. In case of problem, please repackage with jarjar to change the class packages – AutonomousApps Jan 18 '17 at 1:51
  • 1
    Thank you. You have no idea how much this solution helps my blood pressure. – jwehrle Mar 14 '17 at 22:31
  • Ha ha ... yes ... I helped me very very much! +1 – tm1701 May 28 '17 at 17:28
  • 1
    The version is very old and may not work. Use org.json:json:20180130. – Somebody Mar 29 '18 at 11:38
0

Well, my first hunch would be that your getMessage() method returns null. You could show the body of that method in your question and have us find the answer for you, but you should probably research how to debug android applications using breakpoints.
That way you can run your code step by step and see the values of each variable at every step. That would show you your problem in no time, and it's a skill you should definitely master as soon as possible if you intend to get seriously involved in programming.

  • Thanks for the answer and the suggestion. I have already provided the body of the getMessage() method. It is part of the SlackMessageRequest, did you look at that? I don't see how it could be null however. I'm pretty familiar with debugging, but I'm running these tests in terminal so I haven't figured out a way I can debug them. Any suggestions on how I can achieve that? – tambykojak Sep 3 '15 at 21:26
  • @tambykojak maybe this can help bignerdranch.com/blog/… my next hunch would be that message and channel are null when passed into the constructor. You didn't show the part of code where you initialize those variables. If setting up a debugging environment is too complicated, you could always add temporary logging between some lines. – Zoltán Sep 3 '15 at 21:33
  • I've read that blog multiple times, but it doesn't solve that issue. Even if channel and test are null, the test should still pass based on the logic provided. – tambykojak Sep 3 '15 at 21:43
  • 1
    Yeah, it should work with null, you're right. Anyway. Add some logging or simple System.out.println at key parts and see where the nulls come from. – Zoltán Sep 3 '15 at 21:49

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