20

Is there any way to allow a user to register on the local strategy with his password, email and name?
Every example I could find online only use name/password or email/password.

I also searched through the the whole passport documentation, but that documentation isn't helpful at all. It's just one bloated site full of examples.
I just need an list of functions, classes and variables passport uses with explanations what they and every parameter of them do. Every good library has something like that, why can't I find it for passport?

Here are the key parts of my code:

passport.use('local-signup', new LocalStrategy({
    usernameField: 'email',
    passwordField: 'password',
    //are there other options?
    //emailField did not seem to do anything
    passReqToCallback: true // allows us to pass in the req from our route (lets us check if a user is logged in or not)
},
function(req, email, password, done) {
    //check if email not already in database
        //create new user using "email" and "password"
        //I want an additional parameter here "name"
}));

So is passport really that limited? There has to be a way to do this, right?

3
  • 1
    you'd probably have to build your own strategy, but you can easily find already built strategies like this one github.com/zkochan/passport-email
    – mfreitas
    Sep 12, 2015 at 8:38
  • 9
    No. I will definitely not force my users to have a facebook/google/twitter or whatever account.
    – Forivin
    Sep 18, 2015 at 12:25
  • It depends on who the user is, and the place in which the app is being used. I doubt any user will open a ticket for you if you let them use Google or Facebook or Twitter. With that said, having a username-cum-password option on standby will help those who aren't tired of entering their details. Its a free world
    – KhoPhi
    Apr 24, 2016 at 18:47

7 Answers 7

26
+25

You can be a little confused but passport doesn't implement signup methods. It's just authorisation library. So you must handle that use-case on your own.

First of all, create route that will be responsible for sign-up and your checks:

signup: function (req, res) {
  User
    .findOne({
      or: [{username: req.param('username')}, {email: req.param('email')}]
    })
    .then(function(user) {
      if (user) return {message: 'User already exists'};          
      return User.create(req.allParams());
    })
    .then(res.ok)
    .catch(res.negotiate);
}

The example above is based on Sails framework, but you can fit it with no problems to your own case.

Next step is include passport local strategy.

var passport = require('passport');
var LocalStrategy = require('passport-local').Strategy;

var LOCAL_STRATEGY_CONFIG = {
  usernameField: 'email',
  passwordField: 'password',
  session: false,
  passReqToCallback: true
};

function _onLocalStrategyAuth(req, email, password, next) {
  User
    .findOne(or: [{email: email}, {username: email}])
    .then(function (user) {
      if (!user) return next(null, null, {
        code: 'E_USER_NOT_FOUND',
        message: email + ' is not found',
        status: 401
      });

      if (!HashService.bcrypt.compareSync(password, user.password)) return next(null, null, {
        code: 'E_WRONG_PASSWORD',
        message: 'Password is wrong',
        status: 401
      });

      return next(null, user, {});
    })
    .catch(next);
}

passport.use(new LocalStrategy(LOCAL_STRATEGY_CONFIG), _onLocalStrategyAuth));

We have only signin task now. It's simple.

signin: function(req, res) {
  passport.authenticate('local', function(error, user, info) {
    if (error || !user) return res.negotiate(Object.assign(error, info));
    return res.ok(user);
  })(req, res);
}

This way is more suitable for passport and works great for me.

7

Say you have this

app.post('/login', urlencodedParser,
    // so, user has been to /loginpage and clicked submit.
    // /loginpage has a post form that goes to "/login".
    // hence you arrive here.
    passport.authenticate('my-simple-login-strategy', {
        failureRedirect: '/loginagain'
    }),
        function(req, res) {
            console.log("you are in ............")
            res.redirect('/stuff');
    });

Note that the .authenticate has an explicit tag.

The tags is 'my-simple-login-strategy'

That means you have this ...

passport.use(
    'my-simple-login-strategy',
    // !!!!!!!!!!!!!note!!!!!!!!!!, the DEFAULT there (if you have nothing)
    // is 'local'. A good example of defaults being silly :/
    new Strategy(
        STRAT_CONFIG,
        function(email, password, cb) {
           // must return cb(null, false) or cb(null, the_user_struct) or cb(err)
           db.findUserByEmailPass(email, password, function(err, userFoundByDB) {
                if (err) { return cb(err); }
                if (!userFoundByDB) { return cb(null, false); }
                console.log('... ' + JSON.stringify(userFoundByDB) )
                return cb(null, userFoundByDB)
           })
        }
    )
)

!!! !!! NOTE THAT 'local' IS JUST THE DEFAULT TAG NAME !!! !!!

In passport.use, we always put in an explicit tag. It is much clearer if you do so. Put in an explicit tag in the strategy and in the app.post when you use the strategy.

So that's my-simple-login-strategy.

What is the actual db.findUserByEmailPass sql function?

We'll come back to that!

So we have my-simple-login-strategy

Next ...... we need my-simple-createaccount-strategy

Note that we are still sneakily using passport.authenticate:

So:

the strategy my-simple-createaccount-strategy will actually make an account.

However .............

you should still return a struct.

Note that my-simple-login-strategy has to return a struct.

So, my-simple-createaccount-strategy also has to return a struct - in exactly the same way.

app.post('/createaccount', urlencodedParser,
    // so, user has been to /createanaccountform and clicked submit,
    // that sends a post to /createaccount. So we are here:
    passport.authenticate('my-simple-createaccount-strategy', {
        failureRedirect: '/loginagain'
    }),
        function(req, res) {
            console.log("you are in ............")
            res.redirect('/stuff');
    });

And here's the strategy ..........

passport.use(
    'my-simple-createaccount-strategy',
    new Strategy(
        STRAT_CONFIG,
        function(email, password, cb) {
            // return cb(null, false), or cb(null, the_user_struct) or cb(err)
            db.simpleCreate(email, password, function(err, trueOrFalse) {
                if (err) { return cb(err); }
                if (!trueOrFalse) { return cb(null, false); }
                return cb(null, trueOrFalse)
            })
        }
    )
)

The strategy is pretty much the same. But the db call is different.

So now let's look at the db calls.

Let's look at the db calls!

The ordinary db call for the ordinary strategy is going to look like this:

exports.findUserByEmailPass = function(email, password, cb) {
    // return the struct or false via the callback
    dc.query(
        'select * from users where email = ? and password = ?',
        [email, password],
        (error, users, fields) => {
            if (error) { throw error } // or something like cb(new Error('blah'));
            cb(null, (users.length == 1) ? users[0] : false)
        })
}

So that's exports.findUserByEmailPass, which is used by my-simple-login-strategy.

But what about exports.simpleCreate for my-simple-createaccount-strategy?

A simple toy version would

  1. check if the username exists already - return false at this point if it does exist already, then
  2. create it, and then
  3. actually just return the record again.

Recall that (3) is just like in the ordinary "find" call.

Remember ... the strategy my-simple-createaccount-strategy will actually make an account. But you should still return a struct in the same way as your ordinary authenticate strategy, my-simple-login-strategy.

So exports.simpleCreate is a simple chain of three calls:

exports.simpleCreate = function(email, password, cb) {
    // check if exists; insert; re-select and return it
    dc.query(
        'select * from users where email = ?', [email],
        (error, users, fields) => {
            if (error) { throw error } // or something like cb(new Error('blah'));
            if (users.length > 0) {
                return cb(null, false)
            }  
            else {
                return partTwo(email, password, cb)
            }
        })
}

partTwo = function(email, password, cb) {
    dc.query(
        'insert into users (email, password) values (?, ?)', [email, password],
        (error, users, fields) => {
            if (error) { throw error } // or something like cb(new Error('blah'));
            partThree(email, password, cb)
        })
}

partThree = function(email, password, cb) {
    dc.query(
        'select * from users where email = ? and password = ?', [email, password],
        (error, users, fields) => {
            if (error) { throw error } // or something like cb(new Error('blah'));
            cb(null, (users.length == 1) ? users[0] : false)
        })
}

And that all works.

But note that

passport has nothing to do with account creation!

In fact, you do not have to use a strategy at all.

In app.post('/createaccount' you can, if you wish, do nothing with passport.authenticate ... don't even mention it in the code. Don't use authenticate at all. Just go ahead and do the sql process of inserting a new user, right there in app.post.

However, if you "trickily" use a passport strategy - my-simple-createaccount-strategy in the example - you have the bonus that the user is then immediately logged-in with a session and everything works in the same pattern as the login post. Cool.

6

Here is what worked for me, the solution is based on a mongoose based odm, the first part is the passport related part, I also attached the user part from odm to who how the encryption of the password is done.

If I understood your question, you want the user to type either his email or password. In this case modify the search to try both, that is, match the provided user identifier (in your call to findOne(...) with either the username or password.

Note that I use bcrypt to avoid storing clear passwords, that's why there is a customized compare method for testing passwords. Also note 'hints' of using google auth as well, My system enabled both, if it is relevant, please lemme know and I can add the required code.

------------ Auth part (just relevant snippets) -----------

var passport = require('passport'),
LocalStrategy = require('passport-local').Strategy;

passport.serializeUser(function(user, done) {
    // the values returned here will be used to deserializeUser
    // this can be use for further logins
    done(null, {username: user.username, _id: user.id, role: user.role});
});

passport.deserializeUser(function(user, done) {
    done(null, user);
});


passport.use(new LocalStrategy(function(username, password, done){
    odm.User.findOne({username: username, authType: 'direct'}, function(err, user){
        if(err){
            return done(err, false);
        }
        if(!user){
            return done(null, false);
        }
        if(user.role === 'new'){
            console.log('can not use new user!');
            return done('user not activated yet, please contact admin', false);
        }
        user.comparePassword(password,function(err, isMatch){
            if(err){
                return done(err, false);
            }
            if(isMatch){
                return done(null, user);//{username: username});
            }
            return done(null, false);
        });
    });
}));
app.post('/login',  function(req, res, next){
        passport.authenticate('local', {
            failureRedirect: '/logout?status=login failed'
        }, function(err, user, info){
                if(err){
                    return next(err);
                }
                if(!user){
                    return res.redirect('/login');
                }
                req.logIn(user, function(err){
                    if (req.body.rememberme) {
                        req.session.cookie.maxAge = 30*24*60*60*1000 ;//Rememeber 'me' for 30 days
                    } else {
                        req.session.cookie.expires = false;
                    }
                    var redirect = req.param('redirect') || '/index';
                    res.redirect(redirect);
                });
            }
        )(req, res, next);
    }
);

app.post('/register',function(req, res){
    var user = new odm.User({username: req.body.username, password: req.body.password, email: req.body.email, authType: 'direct'});
    user.save(function(err, user){
        if(err){
            console.log('registration err: ' , err);
        } else {
            res.redirect('/list');
        }
    });
});

--- user/odm, relevant parts ----------------

var bcrypt = require('bcrypt-nodejs');

// --------------------- User ------------------------------------------ //
var userSchema = new Schema({
    name: String,
    email: String,
    username: {type: String, required: true, unique: true},
    password: String,
    role: {type: String, required: true, enum: ['new', 'admin', 'user'], default: 'new'},
    authType: {type: String, enum: ['google', 'direct'], required: true}
});

userSchema.pre('save', function (next) {
    var user = this;
    if (!user.isModified('password')) return next();

    console.log('making hash...........');
    bcrypt.genSalt(SALT_WORK_FACTOR, function (err, salt) {
        if (err) return next(err);

        bcrypt.hash(user.password, salt, null, function (err, hash) {
            if (err) return next(err);
            user.password = hash;
            next();
        });
    });
});

userSchema.methods.comparePassword = function (candidatePassword, cb) {
    bcrypt.compare(candidatePassword, this.password, function (err, isMatch) {
        if (err) return cb(err);
        cb(null, isMatch);
    });
};
4
var localStrategy = require('passport-local').Strategy;
var User = require('../public/models/user');

module.exports = function(passport){

    passport.serializeUser(function(user, done){
        done(null, user.id);
    });

    passport.deserializeUser(function(id, done){
        User.findById(id, function(err, user){
            done(err, user);
        });
    });

    passport.use('local-signup', new localStrategy({
        usernameField: 'email',
        passwordField: 'password',
        passReqToCallback: true
    },
    function(req, email, password, done){
        process.nextTick(function(){
             User.findOne({'local.enroll': email}, function(err, user){
                 if(err)
                     return done(err);
                 if(user){
                     return done(null, false, req.flash('signupmessage', 'The email already taken'));
                 } else{
                     var newUser = new User();
                     newUser.local.enroll = email;
                     newUser.local.password = newUser.generateHash(password);                     
                     newUser.save(function(err){
                         if(err)
                             throw err
                         return done(null, newUser);
                     });
                 }

             });
        });
    }));

    passport.use('local-login', new localStrategy({
        usernameField: 'email',
        passwordField: 'password',
        passReqToCallback: true
    },
    function(req, email, password, done){
        process.nextTick(function(){
             User.findOne({'local.enroll': email}, function(err, user){
                 if(err)
                     return done(err);
                 if(!user){
                     return done(null, false, req.flash('loginmessage', 'No user found'));
                 }
                 if(!user.validPassword(password)){
                     return done(null, false, req.flash('loginmessage', 'Invalid password'));
                 }
                 return done(null, user);
             });
        });
    }));    
}
4
+100

This has actually nothing to do with passport and is pretty simple, assuming you are using body-parser. Make sure you have an input field in your form with the attribute name="name" where you register the user's name like:

<div class="form-group">
    <label for="signup-name">Name</label>
    <input type="text" placeholder="Name" name="name">
</div> 

In your routing, you can access this field with req.body.name:

passport.use('local-signup', new LocalStrategy({
    usernameField: 'email',
    passwordField: 'password',
    //are there other options?
    //emailField did not seem to do anything
    passReqToCallback: true
},
function(req, email, password, done) {
    //check if email not already in database
    //create new user using "email" and "password"
    //I want an additional parameter here "name"

    user.email = email;
    user.password = password; // Do some hashing before storing

    user.name = req.body.name;

}));

So you can add as many form input fields as you want, access them by the value of the name attribute. A Second example would be:

<input type="text" placeholder="City" name="city">
<input type="text" placeholder="Country" name="country">

// Access them by
user.city = req.body.city;
user.country = req.body.country;
1
  • Kurt, thanks for that key insight that it simply has nothing to do with Passport! You may like to "check my work" in my answer ! Cheers
    – Fattie
    Aug 25, 2019 at 0:22
1
UserModel.find({email: req.body.email}, function(err, user){                                               
    if(err){                                                                  
       res.redirect('/your sign up page');                                                                          
    } else {                                                                  
      if(user.length > 0){                                                    
       res.redirect('/again your sign up page');                                                                      
      } else{                                                               
        //YOUR REGISTRATION CODES HERE                                                                     
       }                                                                          
    }                                                                        
})
1

In strategy options set the passReqToCallback:true and then add req as parameter into your callback function. Finally, read the extra information from req.body object for example req.body.firstName

const signup = new Strategy({
    usernameField: "username",
    passwordField: "password",
    passReqToCallback:true
  }, async (req, username, password, done) => {
  try {
    const user = User.create();
    user.username = username;
    user.password = password;
    user.firstName = req.body.firstName;
    user.lastName = req.body.lastName
    await user.save()
    return done(null, user);
  } catch (error) {
    return done(error, null);
  }
});

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