119

How to increment the day of a datetime?

for i in range(1, 35)
    date = datetime.datetime(2003, 8, i)
    print(date)

But I need pass through months and years correctly? Any ideas?

206
date = datetime.datetime(2003,8,1,12,4,5)
for i in range(5): 
    date += datetime.timedelta(days=1)
    print(date) 
  • 7
    If you need to take into account daylight saving time; it is more complex e.g., see How can I subtract a day from a python date? – jfs Jun 25 '15 at 19:51
  • 4
    doesn't work for 06/30 + 1day => 06/31 must be 07/01 !!! – m3asmi Oct 16 '15 at 10:11
  • 6
    works like a charm...even for 06/30. – frostbite Apr 29 '16 at 16:39
47

Incrementing dates can be accomplished using timedelta objects:

import datetime

datetime.datetime.now() + datetime.timedelta(days=1)

Look up timedelta objects in the Python docs: http://docs.python.org/library/datetime.html

8

All of the current answers are wrong in some cases as they do not consider that timezones change their offset relative to UTC. So in some cases adding 24h is different from adding a calendar day.

Proposed solution

The following solution works for Samoa and keeps the local time constant.

def add_day(today):
    """
    Add a day to the current day.

    This takes care of historic offset changes and DST.

    Parameters
    ----------
    today : timezone-aware datetime object

    Returns
    -------
    tomorrow : timezone-aware datetime object
    """
    today_utc = today.astimezone(datetime.timezone.utc)
    tz = today.tzinfo
    tomorrow_utc = today_utc + datetime.timedelta(days=1)
    tomorrow_utc_tz = tomorrow_utc.astimezone(tz)
    tomorrow_utc_tz = tomorrow_utc_tz.replace(hour=today.hour,
                                              minute=today.minute,
                                              second=today.second)
    return tomorrow_utc_tz

Tested Code

# core modules
import datetime

# 3rd party modules
import pytz


# add_day methods
def add_day(today):
    """
    Add a day to the current day.

    This takes care of historic offset changes and DST.

    Parameters
    ----------
    today : timezone-aware datetime object

    Returns
    -------
    tomorrow : timezone-aware datetime object
    """
    today_utc = today.astimezone(datetime.timezone.utc)
    tz = today.tzinfo
    tomorrow_utc = today_utc + datetime.timedelta(days=1)
    tomorrow_utc_tz = tomorrow_utc.astimezone(tz)
    tomorrow_utc_tz = tomorrow_utc_tz.replace(hour=today.hour,
                                              minute=today.minute,
                                              second=today.second)
    return tomorrow_utc_tz


def add_day_datetime_timedelta_conversion(today):
    # Correct for Samoa, but dst shift
    today_utc = today.astimezone(datetime.timezone.utc)
    tz = today.tzinfo
    tomorrow_utc = today_utc + datetime.timedelta(days=1)
    tomorrow_utc_tz = tomorrow_utc.astimezone(tz)
    return tomorrow_utc_tz


def add_day_dateutil_relativedelta(today):
    # WRONG!
    from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta
    return today + relativedelta(days=1)


def add_day_datetime_timedelta(today):
    # WRONG!
    return today + datetime.timedelta(days=1)


# Test cases
def test_samoa(add_day):
    """
    Test if add_day properly increases the calendar day for Samoa.

    Due to economic considerations, Samoa went from 2011-12-30 10:00-11:00
    to 2011-12-30 10:00+13:00. Hence the country skipped 2011-12-30 in its
    local time.

    See https://stackoverflow.com/q/52084423/562769

    A common wrong result here is 2011-12-30T23:59:00-10:00. This date never
    happened in Samoa.
    """
    tz = pytz.timezone('Pacific/Apia')
    today_utc = datetime.datetime(2011, 12, 30, 9, 59,
                                  tzinfo=datetime.timezone.utc)
    today_tz = today_utc.astimezone(tz)  # 2011-12-29T23:59:00-10:00
    tomorrow = add_day(today_tz)
    return tomorrow.isoformat() == '2011-12-31T23:59:00+14:00'


def test_dst(add_day):
    """Test if add_day properly increases the calendar day if DST happens."""
    tz = pytz.timezone('Europe/Berlin')
    today_utc = datetime.datetime(2018, 3, 25, 0, 59,
                                  tzinfo=datetime.timezone.utc)
    today_tz = today_utc.astimezone(tz)  # 2018-03-25T01:59:00+01:00
    tomorrow = add_day(today_tz)
    return tomorrow.isoformat() == '2018-03-26T01:59:00+02:00'


to_test = [(add_day_dateutil_relativedelta, 'relativedelta'),
           (add_day_datetime_timedelta, 'timedelta'),
           (add_day_datetime_timedelta_conversion, 'timedelta+conversion'),
           (add_day, 'timedelta+conversion+dst')]
print('{:<25}: {:>5} {:>5}'.format('Method', 'Samoa', 'DST'))
for method, name in to_test:
    print('{:<25}: {:>5} {:>5}'
          .format(name,
                  test_samoa(method),
                  test_dst(method)))

Test results

Method                   : Samoa   DST
relativedelta            :     0     0
timedelta                :     0     0
timedelta+conversion     :     1     0
timedelta+conversion+dst :     1     1
  • The others answers are not entirely wrong, they are perfectly fine while working with UTC or naive (tzinfo == None) datetimes. – Delgan Nov 10 '18 at 19:08
7

Here is another method to add days on date using dateutil's relativedelta.

from datetime import datetime
from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta

print 'Today: ',datetime.now().strftime('%d/%m/%Y %H:%M:%S') 
date_after_month = datetime.now()+ relativedelta(day=1)
print 'After a Days:', date_after_month.strftime('%d/%m/%Y %H:%M:%S')

Output:

Today: 25/06/2015 20:41:44

After a Days: 01/06/2015 20:41:44

  • 1
    why would you use it instead of timedelta() from stdlib? – jfs Jun 25 '15 at 19:45
  • 2
    @J.F.Sebastian Just to share another possible possible way to add day. – Atul Arvind Jun 26 '15 at 8:09
  • 1
    If there's no advantage, I don't think it adds value. – Tejas Manohar Jun 22 '16 at 7:06

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