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I have to find out if a triangle is right, acute or obtuse angled from 3 given side lengths of the triangle.

This is what I have until now:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>

//Program that calculates the type of triangle
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

    int x,y,z;

    printf("Type in the integer lengths of 3 sides of a triangle:\n");
    scanf("%d %d %d", &x, &y, &z); //reads the user's inputs
    if((x<=0) || (y<=0) || (z<=0)) {
      printf("This is not a triangle.\n");
    } else {
        if((x + y <= z) || (x + z <= y) || (y + z <= x)) {
        printf("This is not a triangle.\n");
        } else {

            if( ((x * x) + (y * y) == (z * z)) || ((x * x) + (z * z) == (y * y)) || ((z * z) + (y * y) == (x * x)) ) {
                printf("This is a right-angled triangle.\n");
            } else if( ( ((x * x) + (y * y) < (z * z)) || ((x * x) + (z * z) < (y * y)) || ((z * z) + (y * y) < (x * x)) ) || ( ( x<=z && y<=z ) || ( x<=y && z<=y ) || ( y<=x && z<=x ) ) ) {
                printf("This is an acute-angled triangle.\n");
            } else if( ( ((x * x) + (y * y) > (z * z)) || ((x * x) + (z * z) > (y * y)) || ((z * z) + (y * y) > (x * x)) ) || ( ( x>z && y>z ) || ( x>y && z>y ) || ( y>x && z>x ) ) ) {
                printf("This is an obtuse-angled triangle.\n");
            } else {
                printf("Not a triangle\n");
            }

        }
  }

  return 0;
}

But I keep receiving the same error "This is an acute-angled triangle" for obtuse-angled triangles like 10, 10, 11

Any idea what I am doing wrong?

Thank you

  • 3
    Isn't that because 10, 10, 11 is an acute angled triangle? – Weather Vane Sep 6 '15 at 18:44
  • 2
  • oh sorry, did not realize it is an acute angled triangle. thank you both for the help. – zeeks Sep 6 '15 at 18:49
  • @WeatherVane another update, that code above says that triangle 10,10,19 is acute-angled and I checked to wolframalpha that triangle is obtuse-angled. – zeeks Sep 6 '15 at 18:57
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I've simplified your code, by finding the longest side first, and removing most of the comparisons (and brackets).

But most importantly, your squares comparison for acute and obtuse was the wrong way round. The sum of the smaller sides' squares is greater than the longest, for an acute triangle.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>

//Program that calculates the type of triangle
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

    int x,y,z,longest;

    printf("Type in the integer lengths of 3 sides of a triangle:\n");
    scanf("%d %d %d", &x, &y, &z); //reads the user's inputs
    if((x<=0) || (y<=0) || (z<=0)) {
      printf("This is not a triangle.\n");
    } else {
        if((x + y <= z) || (x + z <= y) || (y + z <= x)) {
        printf("This is not a triangle.\n");
        } else {

            longest = z;
            if (longest < x) {
                z = longest;
                longest = x;
                x = z;
            }
            if (longest < y) {
                z = longest;
                longest = y;
                y = z;
            }

            if( x * x + y * y == longest * longest ) {
                printf("This is a right-angled triangle.\n");
            } else if( x * x + y * y > longest * longest) {
                printf("This is an acute-angled triangle.\n");
            } else printf("This is an obtuse-angled triangle.\n");
        }
  }

  return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
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For a triangle with sides a,b,c:

to be acute angle: a^2+b^2 > c^2 and b^2+c^2 > a^2 and c^2+a^2 > b^2.

to be obtuse angle: a^2+b^2 < c^2 or b^2+c^2 < a^2 or c^2+a^2 > b^2.

| improve this answer | |
  • Each one of the sub equation assume that one of the sides is the longest. Are you sure you can combine the 3 without creating false positives? i.e. Can a^2+b^2 < c^2 return true for some values when c isn't the longest side? – tuxayo Oct 10 '16 at 6:35
  • 1
    No it will not create false positives.As an obtuse angle triangle will have only one obtuse angle So only one condition with return true – Ankit Chaudhary Oct 13 '16 at 9:54

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