0

After a series of random refactors made when searching for a work around of a compile problem I found a very concise example of something that looks like it should compile but doesn't:

trait SubtypeOf[+T] {
    type Type <: T
}

def SubtypeOf[T] :SubtypeOf[T] = new SubtypeOf[T] { type Type = T }

class InVar[T]

trait Module {
    type This = this.type
    val X = SubtypeOf[AnyRef]
    type X = X.Type

    val arg :InVar[Option[This#X]]
    def fail[M<:Module](arg :InVar[Option[M#X]]) = ???

    fail[This](arg) //error, although there's a 1-1 term substitution!
}

Substituting val X=... and type X=... with an abstract declaration type X makes it compile. Even funnier, the following compiles, too:

trait Module {
    type This = this.type

    type X

    val arg :InVar[Option[This#X]]
    def fail[M<:Module](arg :InVar[Option[M#X]]) = ???

    fail(arg) 
}

trait BaseModule extends Module {
    val X = SubtypeOf[AnyRef]
    type X = X.Type
}

Is it supposed to work like this, a bug, or completely shady area? Looks like I'll have to juggle code between various traits extending one another based on where the compiler accepts it, rather than where it makes sense from design point of view.

0

I submitted this an issue: https://issues.scala-lang.org/browse/SI-9469 It has been accepted as a duplicate of an existing bug (in cause, not effect), so presumably it will be fixed at some point.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.