75

I'm using a third party storage system that only returns me stdClass objects no matter what I feed in for some obscure reason. So I'm curious to know if there is a way to cast/convert an stdClass object into a full fledged object of a given type.

For instance something along the lines of:

//$stdClass is an stdClass instance
$converted = (BusinessClass) $stdClass;

I am just casting the stdClass into an array and feed it to the BusinessClass constructor, but maybe there is a way to restore the initial class that I am not aware of.

Note: I am not interested in 'Change your storage system' type of answers since it is not the point of interest. Please consider it more an academic question on the language capacities.

Cheers

  • 1
    How did you solve? – nerkn Dec 19 '10 at 14:39
  • It's explained in my post after the pseudo code sample. I am casting into an array and feeding to a automated constructor. – The Mighty Rubber Duck Dec 20 '10 at 5:15
  • @Adam Puza 's answer is much better than the hack shown in the accepted answer. although I am sure a mapper would still be the prefered method – Chris Jun 25 '15 at 16:49
  • Well how does PDOStatement::fetchObject accomplish this task? – William Entriken Jan 8 '18 at 17:16
82

See the manual on Type Juggling on possible casts.

The casts allowed are:

  • (int), (integer) - cast to integer
  • (bool), (boolean) - cast to boolean
  • (float), (double), (real) - cast to float
  • (string) - cast to string
  • (array) - cast to array
  • (object) - cast to object
  • (unset) - cast to NULL (PHP 5)

You would have to write a Mapper that does the casting from stdClass to another concrete class. Shouldn't be too hard to do.

Or, if you are in a hackish mood, you could adapt the following code:

function arrayToObject(array $array, $className) {
    return unserialize(sprintf(
        'O:%d:"%s"%s',
        strlen($className),
        $className,
        strstr(serialize($array), ':')
    ));
}

which pseudocasts an array to an object of a certain class. This works by first serializing the array and then changing the serialized data so that it represents a certain class. The result is unserialized to an instance of this class then. But like I said, it's hackish, so expect side-effects.

For object to object, the code would be

function objectToObject($instance, $className) {
    return unserialize(sprintf(
        'O:%d:"%s"%s',
        strlen($className),
        $className,
        strstr(strstr(serialize($instance), '"'), ':')
    ));
}
  • 9
    This hack is a clever technique. Won't be using it since my current way of solving the issue is more stable, but interesting nonetheless. – The Mighty Rubber Duck Jul 14 '10 at 23:56
  • You end up with a __PHP_Incomplete_Class object by using this method (at least as of PHP 5.6). – TiMESPLiNTER May 21 '15 at 11:24
  • 1
    @TiMESPLiNTER no, you don't. See codepad.org/spGkyLzL. Make sure the class to cast to was included prior to calling the function. – Gordon May 21 '15 at 11:34
  • Okay my fault but have a look with namespaces: eval.in/368104 – TiMESPLiNTER May 21 '15 at 11:42
  • @TiMESPLiNTER not sure what you mean. it worked. it's an example\Foo now. – Gordon May 21 '15 at 11:43
49

You can use above function for casting not similar class objects (PHP >= 5.3)

/**
 * Class casting
 *
 * @param string|object $destination
 * @param object $sourceObject
 * @return object
 */
function cast($destination, $sourceObject)
{
    if (is_string($destination)) {
        $destination = new $destination();
    }
    $sourceReflection = new ReflectionObject($sourceObject);
    $destinationReflection = new ReflectionObject($destination);
    $sourceProperties = $sourceReflection->getProperties();
    foreach ($sourceProperties as $sourceProperty) {
        $sourceProperty->setAccessible(true);
        $name = $sourceProperty->getName();
        $value = $sourceProperty->getValue($sourceObject);
        if ($destinationReflection->hasProperty($name)) {
            $propDest = $destinationReflection->getProperty($name);
            $propDest->setAccessible(true);
            $propDest->setValue($destination,$value);
        } else {
            $destination->$name = $value;
        }
    }
    return $destination;
}

EXAMPLE:

class A 
{
  private $_x;   
}

class B 
{
  public $_x;   
}

$a = new A();
$b = new B();

$x = cast('A',$b);
$x = cast('B',$a);
  • 5
    That's a pretty elegant solution, I must say! I just wonder how well it scales... Reflection scares me. – Theodore R. Smith May 5 '12 at 2:52
  • Hey Adam, this solution solved a similar problem for me here: stackoverflow.com/questions/35350585/… If you want to score an easy answer, head on over and I'll check it off. Thanks! – oucil Feb 12 '16 at 16:27
  • It doesn't work for properties inherited from parent classes. – Toilal May 18 '17 at 21:21
  • I've just used this as a basis of my solution for seeding my database with known IDs for API functional testing with Behat. My issue was that my normal IDs are generated UUIDs and I didn't want to add a setId() method in my entity just for the sake of my testing layer, and I didn't want to load fixtures files and slow down tests. Now I can include @Given the user :username has the id :id in my feature, and handle it with reflections in the context class – nealio82 Jan 5 '18 at 11:09
  • 1
    Great solution, I do want to add that $destination = new $destination(); can be swapped with $destination = ( new ReflectionClass( $destination ) )->newInstanceWithoutConstructor(); if you need to avoid calling the constructor. – Scuzzy May 11 '18 at 3:56
13

To move all existing properties of a stdClass to a new object of a specified class name:

/**
 * recast stdClass object to an object with type
 *
 * @param string $className
 * @param stdClass $object
 * @throws InvalidArgumentException
 * @return mixed new, typed object
 */
function recast($className, stdClass &$object)
{
    if (!class_exists($className))
        throw new InvalidArgumentException(sprintf('Inexistant class %s.', $className));

    $new = new $className();

    foreach($object as $property => &$value)
    {
        $new->$property = &$value;
        unset($object->$property);
    }
    unset($value);
    $object = (unset) $object;
    return $new;
}

Usage:

$array = array('h','n');

$obj=new stdClass;
$obj->action='auth';
$obj->params= &$array;
$obj->authKey=md5('i');

class RestQuery{
    public $action;
    public $params=array();
    public $authKey='';
}

$restQuery = recast('RestQuery', $obj);

var_dump($restQuery, $obj);

Output:

object(RestQuery)#2 (3) {
  ["action"]=>
  string(4) "auth"
  ["params"]=>
  &array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(1) "h"
    [1]=>
    string(1) "n"
  }
  ["authKey"]=>
  string(32) "865c0c0b4ab0e063e5caa3387c1a8741"
}
NULL

This is limited because of the new operator as it is unknown which parameters it would need. For your case probably fitting.

  • 1
    To inform others attempting to use this method. There is a caveat to this function in that iterating over an instantiated object outside of itself will not be able to set private or protected properties within the casted object. EG: Setting public $authKey=''; to private $authKey=''; Results in E_ERROR : type 1 -- Cannot access private property RestQuery::$authKey – fyrye Jan 23 '14 at 17:40
  • A stdClass with private properties though? – Frug Feb 2 '15 at 18:15
  • @Frug The OP specifically indicates this requirement... cast/convert an stdClass object into a full fledged object of a given type – oucil Feb 12 '16 at 16:29
10

I have a very similar problem. Simplified reflection solution worked just fine for me:

public static function cast($destination, \stdClass $source)
{
    $sourceReflection = new \ReflectionObject($source);
    $sourceProperties = $sourceReflection->getProperties();
    foreach ($sourceProperties as $sourceProperty) {
        $name = $sourceProperty->getName();
        $destination->{$name} = $source->$name;
    }
    return $destination;
}
8

Hope that somebody find this useful

// new instance of stdClass Object
$item = (object) array(
    'id'     => 1,
    'value'  => 'test object',
);

// cast the stdClass Object to another type by passing
// the value through constructor
$casted = new ModelFoo($item);

// OR..

// cast the stdObject using the method
$casted = new ModelFoo;
$casted->cast($item);
class Castable
{
    public function __construct($object = null)
    {
        $this->cast($object);
    }

    public function cast($object)
    {
        if (is_array($object) || is_object($object)) {
            foreach ($object as $key => $value) {
                $this->$key = $value;
            }
        }
    }
} 
class ModelFoo extends Castable
{
    public $id;
    public $value;
}
  • Can you explain why "is_array($object) || is_array($object)" ? – kukinsula Jan 31 '15 at 15:55
  • sorry, the second one should be is_object(), fixed – Wizzard Feb 26 '15 at 10:30
5

Changed function for deep casting (using recursion)

/**
 * Translates type
 * @param $destination Object destination
 * @param stdClass $source Source
 */
private static function Cast(&$destination, stdClass $source)
{
    $sourceReflection = new \ReflectionObject($source);
    $sourceProperties = $sourceReflection->getProperties();
    foreach ($sourceProperties as $sourceProperty) {
        $name = $sourceProperty->getName();
        if (gettype($destination->{$name}) == "object") {
            self::Cast($destination->{$name}, $source->$name);
        } else {
            $destination->{$name} = $source->$name;
        }
    }
}
0

BTW: Converting is highly important if you are serialized, mainly because the de-serialization breaks the type of objects and turns into stdclass, including DateTime objects.

I updated the example of @Jadrovski, now it allows objects and arrays.

example

$stdobj=new StdClass();
$stdobj->field=20;
$obj=new SomeClass();
fixCast($obj,$stdobj);

example array

$stdobjArr=array(new StdClass(),new StdClass());
$obj=array(); 
$obj[0]=new SomeClass(); // at least the first object should indicates the right class.
fixCast($obj,$stdobj);

code: (its recursive). However, i don't know if its recursive with arrays. May be its missing an extra is_array

public static function fixCast(&$destination,$source)
{
    if (is_array($source)) {
        $getClass=get_class($destination[0]);
        $array=array();
        foreach($source as $sourceItem) {
            $obj = new $getClass();
            fixCast($obj,$sourceItem);
            $array[]=$obj;
        }
        $destination=$array;
    } else {
        $sourceReflection = new \ReflectionObject($source);
        $sourceProperties = $sourceReflection->getProperties();
        foreach ($sourceProperties as $sourceProperty) {
            $name = $sourceProperty->getName();
            if (is_object(@$destination->{$name})) {
                fixCast($destination->{$name}, $source->$name);
            } else {
                $destination->{$name} = $source->$name;
            }
        }
    }
}
0

consider adding a new method to BusinessClass:

public static function fromStdClass(\stdClass $in): BusinessClass
{
  $out                   = new self();
  $reflection_object     = new \ReflectionObject($in);
  $reflection_properties = $reflection_object->getProperties();
  foreach ($reflection_properties as $reflection_property)
  {
    $name = $reflection_property->getName();
    if (property_exists('BusinessClass', $name))
    {
      $out->{$name} = $in->$name;
    }
  }
  return $out;
}

then you can make a new BusinessClass from $stdClass:

$converted = BusinessClass::fromStdClass($stdClass);

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