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There is a certain library I use in my project. This library has an interface which has about 15 methods.

The purpose of this interface is to make it possible to subscribe for some events that are generated in the library. A listener class in application can implement this interface and register itself as a listener in the library to receive events.

All the methods in this interface are actually events. There can be listeners who only need to receive only one or two events from many events in the interface. Even though a listener is only interested in few events, listener has to implement all the methods when extending the interface.

So I asked the developer of this library to add empty default implementations to the methods in the interface.

But the library developer refuses to add default implementations, stating that it would violate java best practices and using default implementations in interface methods go against the purpose of interfaces.

But, as I can understand, a method in this interface does not specify some action which an implementer of this interface should be capable of. A method in this interface rather defines an event which an implementer may be interested in. So I can't see a clear reason for not adding default implementations.

So, is adding default implementations to this interface break the java best practices?

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    In java 8, you can specify a default implementation to interface methods, making it optional for an implementer of the interface to implement the method. – Lahiru Chandima Sep 7 '15 at 14:24
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    This is really an opinion question; there isn't an objective answer. But remember that even if the library developer doesn't want to add default implementations to the interface, you can create an interface of your own that extends the one in the library and adds the empty default implementations. Your "real" implementation classes can implement that. – Wyzard Sep 7 '15 at 14:50
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    @jaco0646 Okay, then please define "best practices" in a strictly non-subjective and non-arbitrary way. – biziclop Sep 7 '15 at 16:12
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    In any case, it is clearly a fault of the API designer, and he needs to provide a better solution. – ZhongYu Sep 7 '15 at 17:06
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    It's comical that in computer industry people throw around big words and nobody knows what they mean. Why don't we stop speaking like some fundamental jihadists, and focus on practical matters, like, is there an easier way to user you API. – ZhongYu Sep 7 '15 at 17:12
6

But the library developer refuses to add default implementations, stating that it would violate java best practices and using default implementations in interface methods go against the purpose of interfaces.

This argument was valid until default interface methods were introduced. Now your colleague would have to argue that the JLS of Java 8 perverted interfaces and the JDK now contains classes which go against the purpose of interfaces. Still this is a viable extreme standpoint but fruitless.

You simply can avoid the discussion by deriving an own interface from the library interface and providing default empty implementations for all inherited methods.

public interface MyInterface extends LibraryInterface {
    @Override default public void event1() {
    }

    ...
}

Or you both can review the following design which seems dubious to me and which led to your discussion about default method in interfaces:

Even though a listener is only interested in few events, listener has to implement all the methods when extending the interface.

A solution could be to simply split up the big interface in many smaller ones.

4

The library developer is wrong about this (I even dare to omit IMHO).

One of the reasons that many helper (both abstract and concrete) classes in Java have been introduced in the past is exactly the absence of features like default interface methods (for example the adapter classes in Swing which very much resemble the concerns you are asking about).

If not misused, multiple inheritance is desirable in some situations and, as we all know, by extending a 'helper' class in Java we are loosing the ability to inherit from anything else.

Actually, this is mentioned in the official Java tutorial, section "Abstract Classes Compared to Interfaces":

Consider using interfaces if any of these statements apply to your situation:

  • You expect that unrelated classes would implement your interface. For example, the interfaces Comparable and Cloneable are implemented by many unrelated classes.
  • You want to specify the behavior of a particular data type, but not concerned about who implements its behavior.
  • You want to take advantage of multiple inheritance of type.

The second and the third point are the perfect match for your use case I think.

1

Since default methods enable us to add new functionalities to interfaces without breaking the classes that implement that interface so its definitely not a good practice because it combines the virtue of interfaces and abstract classes, but since that isn't an option I would strongly suggest that you provide your own skeletal implementation class, as this 'methodology' is used all over the Collections Framework in java, and that's just my humble opinion.

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