7

a simple example:

#!/usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import multiprocessing

class Klass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "Constructor ... %s" % multiprocessing.current_process().name

    def __del__(self):
        print "... Destructor %s" % multiprocessing.current_process().name


if __name__ == '__main__':
    kls = Klass()

run with error when do current_process in __del__:

Constructor ... MainProcess
Exception AttributeError: "'NoneType' object has no attribute 'current_process'" in <bound method Klass.__del__ of <__main__.Klass object at 0x7f5c34e52090>> ignored

if I change a variable name:

als = Klass()

it get the right result:

Constructor ... MainProcess
... Destructor MainProcess

and I tried many variable name, some ok, some error.

Why different instance name, will cause multiprocessing module be None in __del__?

4
  • I see the same result... that's very weird! – jonrsharpe Sep 7 '15 at 16:57
  • 1
    Same here. Produces the same weird results. So I guess you spotted a bug in multiprocessing. – Sait Sep 7 '15 at 17:08
  • @jonrsharpe see unutbu 's answer – Tanky Woo Sep 8 '15 at 1:46
  • @Sait see unutbu 's answer – Tanky Woo Sep 8 '15 at 1:47
9

The code raises

AttributeError: "'NoneType' object has no attribute 'current_process'"

if the global variable multiprocessing is deleted before kls gets deleted. In general, the order in which objects are deleted is not predictable. However, per the docs:

Starting with version 1.5, Python guarantees that globals whose name begins with a single underscore are deleted from their module before other globals are deleted; if no other references to such globals exist, this may help in assuring that imported modules are still available at the time when the __del__() method is called.

Therefore, if you name the instance _kls (with an underscore), then you can be assured that its __del__ will be called before multiprocessing is deleted:

import multiprocessing 

class Klass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "Constructor ... %s" % multiprocessing.current_process().name

    def __del__(self):
        print "... Destructor %s" % multiprocessing.current_process().name


if __name__ == '__main__':
    _kls = Klass()

yields

Constructor ... MainProcess
... Destructor MainProcess

Other methods of ensuring a del method is called before the module is deleted include

  • using atexit
  • using a context manager
  • saving a reference to the module as an attribute of Klass.
1
  • very thanks! I should be more attention to the warning section of python document. – Tanky Woo Sep 8 '15 at 1:44

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