33

I would like to capture keyevents in my little app.

What I have done:

class ViewController : NSViewController {
...
  override func keyDown(theEvent: NSEvent) {
        if theEvent.keyCode == 124 {
            println("abc")
        } else {
            println("abcd")
        }
    }

    override var acceptsFirstResponder: Bool {
        return true
    }

    override func becomeFirstResponder() -> Bool {
        return true
    }

    override func resignFirstResponder() -> Bool {
        return true
    }

...
}

What happens:

When a key pressed, the Funk sound effect plays.

I've seen many posts talking about how this is a delegate the belongs to NSView and NSViewController does not have access. But the keydown function override auto completes in a class of type NSViewController leading me to believe that this is wrong.

  • Which object is the first responder? – jtbandes Sep 7 '15 at 23:00
  • The ViewController – Cripto Sep 7 '15 at 23:17
  • 1
    To eliminate the "Funk Sound" just return nil instead of the event, in the closure. I use the localMonitor approach. – eonist Jul 27 '16 at 12:00
  • One caveat muting the funk sound this way is that you don't forward the keyDown event to other parts of the app, like cmd+q, to mitigate this you could return nil only on keyDown events you want to target, if you want to target a,b,c keystrokes then return nil only on these keyStrokes etc. – eonist Jul 27 '16 at 12:21
  • the signature has changed on swift 4<br/>override func keyDown(with event: NSEvent) {}<br/> – Klajd Deda Mar 19 at 20:33
52

Xcode 8.2.1 • Swift 3.0.2

import Cocoa

class ViewController: NSViewController {

    @IBOutlet var textField: NSTextField!

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        NSEvent.addLocalMonitorForEvents(matching: .flagsChanged) {
            self.flagsChanged(with: $0)
            return $0
        }
        NSEvent.addLocalMonitorForEvents(matching: .keyDown) {
            self.keyDown(with: $0)
            return $0
        }
    }
    override func keyDown(with event: NSEvent) {
        switch event.modifierFlags.intersection(.deviceIndependentFlagsMask) {
        case [.command] where event.characters == "l",
             [.command, .shift] where event.characters == "l":
            print("command-l or command-shift-l")
        default:
            break
        }
        textField.stringValue = "key = " + (event.charactersIgnoringModifiers
            ?? "")
        textField.stringValue += "\ncharacter = " + (event.characters ?? "")
    }
    override func flagsChanged(with event: NSEvent) {
        switch event.modifierFlags.intersection(.deviceIndependentFlagsMask) {
        case [.shift]:
            print("shift key is pressed")
        case [.control]:
            print("control key is pressed")
        case [.option] :
            print("option key is pressed")
        case [.command]:
            print("Command key is pressed")
        case [.control, .shift]:
            print("control-shift keys are pressed")
        case [.option, .shift]:
            print("option-shift keys are pressed")
        case [.command, .shift]:
            print("command-shift keys are pressed")
        case [.control, .option]:
            print("control-option keys are pressed")
        case [.control, .command]:
            print("control-command keys are pressed")
        case [.option, .command]:
            print("option-command keys are pressed")
        case [.shift, .control, .option]:
            print("shift-control-option keys are pressed")
        case [.shift, .control, .command]:
            print("shift-control-command keys are pressed")
        case [.control, .option, .command]:
            print("control-option-command keys are pressed")
        case [.shift, .command, .option]:
            print("shift-command-option keys are pressed")
        case [.shift, .control, .option, .command]:
            print("shift-control-option-command keys are pressed")
        default:
            print("no modifier keys are pressed")
        }
    }
}

To get rid of the purr sound when pressing the character keys you need to subclass your view, override the method performKeyEquivalent and return true.

import Cocoa

class View: NSView {
    override func performKeyEquivalent(with event: NSEvent) -> Bool {
        return true
    }
}

Sample Project

  • How can you tell if you're using swift 1.2 or 2.0 – Cripto Sep 10 '15 at 3:22
  • This works in Swift 2.x - I can get the keyDown event in my override func keyDown() event code but I still get the "Funk" sound how do you eliminate the "Funk" sound? – Neal Davis Feb 15 '16 at 21:00
  • Leo Dabus - are you suggesting I use your invisible button idea to eliminate the "Funk" sound for keyDown event? – Neal Davis Feb 15 '16 at 21:24
  • My window (view) has several "Label" fields (Labels are really just NSTextFields). – Neal Davis Feb 15 '16 at 21:27
  • Let us continue this discussion in chat. – Neal Davis Feb 15 '16 at 21:32
10

Swift4

Just found a solution for the very same problem, Swift4. The idea behind that: if the pressed key was handled by a custom logic, the handler shall return nil, otherwise the (unhandled) event...

class MyViewController: NSViewController {
   override func viewDidLoad() {
      super.viewDidLoad()
      // ...
      NSEvent.addLocalMonitorForEvents(matching: .keyDown) {
         if self.myKeyDown(with: $0) {
            return nil
         } else {
            return $0
         }
      }
   }
   func myKeyDown(with event: NSEvent) -> Bool {
      // handle keyDown only if current window has focus, i.e. is keyWindow
      guard let locWindow = self.view.window,
         NSApplication.shared.keyWindow === locWindow else { return false }
      switch Int( event.keyCode) {
      case kVK_Escape:
         // do what you want to do at "Escape"
         return true
      default: 
         return false
      }
   }
}

And here we are: no Purr / Funk sound when key is pressed...

[Update] Added check of keyWindow. Without this, keyDown() is fired even if another view/window contains the first responder...

  • 2
    This is the only answer that helped me to get rid of the purr sound – yeyo Dec 4 '18 at 15:42
8

I was trying to find an answer for swift 3, here is what worked for me:

Swift 3

import Cocoa

// We subclass an NSView

class MainView: NSView {

    // Allow view to receive keypress (remove the purr sound)
    override var acceptsFirstResponder : Bool {
        return true
    }

    // Override the NSView keydown func to read keycode of pressed key
    override func keyDown(with theEvent: NSEvent) {
        Swift.print(theEvent.keyCode)
    }

}
2

I manage to get it work from subclass of NSWindowController

class MyWindowController: NSWindowController {

    override func keyDown(theEvent: NSEvent) {
        print("keyCode is \(theEvent.keyCode)")
    }
}

UPDATE:

import Cocoa

protocol WindowControllerDelegate {
    func keyDown(aEvent: NSEvent)
}

class WindowController: NSWindowController {

    var delegate: WindowControllerDelegate?

    override func windowDidLoad() {
        super.windowDidLoad()
        delegate = window?.contentViewController as! ViewController
    }
    override func keyDown(theEvent: NSEvent) {
        delegate?.keyDown(theEvent)
    }

}

and ViewController:

class ViewController: NSViewController, WindowControllerDelegate {

    @IBOutlet weak var textField: NSTextField!

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        // Do any additional setup after loading the view.
    }

    override var representedObject: AnyObject? {
        didSet {
        // Update the view, if already loaded.
        }
    }
    override func keyDown(theEvent: NSEvent) {
        textField.stringValue = "key = " + (theEvent.charactersIgnoringModifiers
            ?? "")
        textField.stringValue += "\ncharacter = " + (theEvent.characters ?? "")
        textField.stringValue += "\nmodifier = " + theEvent.modifierFlags.rawValue.description
    }

}
  • I updated my answer. – Prontto Sep 9 '15 at 20:07
  • No, I don't mind. – Prontto Sep 9 '15 at 21:09
  • It's good. Ok, I have to read more about that @objc in protocols... – Prontto Sep 9 '15 at 21:25

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