In a Django form, how do I make a field read-only (or disabled)?

When the form is being used to create a new entry, all fields should be enabled - but when the record is in update mode some fields need to be read-only.

For example, when creating a new Item model, all fields must be editable, but while updating the record, is there a way to disable the sku field so that it is visible, but cannot be edited?

class Item(models.Model):
    sku = models.CharField(max_length=50)
    description = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    added_by = models.ForeignKey(User)


class ItemForm(ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = Item
        exclude = ('added_by')

def new_item_view(request):
    if request.method == 'POST':
        form = ItemForm(request.POST)
        # Validate and save
    else:
            form = ItemForm()
    # Render the view

Can class ItemForm be reused? What changes would be required in the ItemForm or Item model class? Would I need to write another class, "ItemUpdateForm", for updating the item?

def update_item_view(request):
    if request.method == 'POST':
        form = ItemUpdateForm(request.POST)
        # Validate and save
    else:
        form = ItemUpdateForm()
  • See also SO question: Why are read-only form fields in Django a bad idea? @ stackoverflow.com/questions/2902024 , Accepted answer (by Daniel Naab) takes care of malicious POST hacks. – e70 Aug 13 '11 at 2:14

26 Answers 26

up vote 363 down vote accepted

As pointed out in this answer, Django 1.9 added the Field.disabled attribute:

The disabled boolean argument, when set to True, disables a form field using the disabled HTML attribute so that it won’t be editable by users. Even if a user tampers with the field’s value submitted to the server, it will be ignored in favor of the value from the form’s initial data.

With Django 1.8 and earlier, to disable entry on the widget and prevent malicious POST hacks you must scrub the input in addition to setting the readonly attribute on the form field:

class ItemForm(ModelForm):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(ItemForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        instance = getattr(self, 'instance', None)
        if instance and instance.pk:
            self.fields['sku'].widget.attrs['readonly'] = True

    def clean_sku(self):
        instance = getattr(self, 'instance', None)
        if instance and instance.pk:
            return instance.sku
        else:
            return self.cleaned_data['sku']

Or, replace if instance and instance.pk with another condition indicating you're editing. You could also set the attribute disabled on the input field, instead of readonly.

The clean_sku function will ensure that the readonly value won't be overridden by a POST.

Otherwise, there is no built-in Django form field which will render a value while rejecting bound input data. If this is what you desire, you should instead create a separate ModelForm that excludes the uneditable field(s), and just print them inside your template.

  • 2
    Daniel, Thanks for posting an answer. It is not clear to me how to use this code? wouldn't this code work for same for new as well update mode? Can you edit your answer to give examples on how to use it for new and update forms? Thanks. – e70 Nov 29 '08 at 16:29
  • 6
    The key to Daniel's example is testing the .id field. Newly created objects will have id==None. By the way, one of the oldest open Django tickets is about this issue. See code.djangoproject.com/ticket/342 . – Peter Rowell Nov 29 '08 at 16:52
  • 1
    this doesn't work for FileField methinks. – Skylar Saveland Apr 21 '10 at 19:47
  • 2
    on linux (ubuntu 15 ) / chrome v45, readonly changes the pointer to a "disabled hand" but the field is then clickable. with disabled it works as expected – simone cittadini Oct 8 '15 at 10:19
  • 5
    This answer needs to be updated. A new field argument disabled is added in Django 1.9. If Field.disabled is set to True, then POST value for that Field is ignored. So if you're using 1.9, there's no need to override clean, just set disabled = True. Check this answer. – narendra-choudhary Jun 5 '16 at 5:09

Django 1.9 added the Field.disabled attribute: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.9/ref/forms/fields/#disabled

The disabled boolean argument, when set to True, disables a form field using the disabled HTML attribute so that it won’t be editable by users. Even if a user tampers with the field’s value submitted to the server, it will be ignored in favor of the value from the form’s initial data.

  • 21
    This answer has to be upvoted to heaven, quick. – zopieux Jan 13 '16 at 22:19
  • Nothing for 1.8 LTS ? – dnit13 Apr 11 '16 at 15:02
  • 7
    any idea how we can use this on an UpdateView ? As it generates the fields from the model... – bcsanches Jul 1 '16 at 18:54
  • 3
    Correct answer. My solution class MyChangeForm(forms.ModelForm): def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs): super(MyChangeForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs) self.fields['my_field'].disabled = True – Vijay Katam Jan 18 '17 at 20:03
  • 1
    This is a problematic answer - setting disabled=True will cause the model to be spat back to the user with validation errors. – Ben Jan 11 at 21:55

Setting READONLY on widget only makes the input in the browser read-only. Adding a clean_sku which returns instance.sku ensures the field value will not change on form level.

def clean_sku(self):
    if self.instance: 
        return self.instance.sku
    else: 
        return self.fields['sku']

This way you can use model's (unmodified save) and aviod getting the field required error.

  • 13
    +1 This is a great way to avoid more complicated save() overrides. However, you'd want to do an instance check before the return (in newline-less comment mode): "if self.instance: return self.instance.sku; else: return self.fields['sku']" – Daniel Naab Jan 25 '09 at 6:08
  • I'm still getting the field required error. – geoidesic Aug 23 at 15:42

awalker's answer helped me a lot!

I've changed his example to work with Django 1.3, using get_readonly_fields.

Usually you should declare something like this in app/admin.py:

class ItemAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    ...
    readonly_fields = ('url',)

I've adapted in this way:

# In the admin.py file
class ItemAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    ...
    def get_readonly_fields(self, request, obj=None):
        if obj:
            return ['url']
        else:
            return []

And it works fine. Now if you add an Item, the url field is read-write, but on change it becomes read-only.

  • 4
    This is a great find and a worthy addition to this question! Thank you! – jathanism Sep 6 '11 at 16:41

To make this work for a ForeignKey field, a few changes need to be made. Firstly, the SELECT HTML tag does not have the readonly attribute. We need to use disabled="disabled" instead. However, then the browser doesn't send any form data back for that field. So we need to set that field to not be required so that the field validates correctly. We then need to reset the value back to what it used to be so it's not set to blank.

So for foreign keys you will need to do something like:

class ItemForm(ModelForm):

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(ItemForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        instance = getattr(self, 'instance', None)
        if instance and instance.id:
            self.fields['sku'].required = False
            self.fields['sku'].widget.attrs['disabled'] = 'disabled'

    def clean_sku(self):
        # As shown in the above answer.
        instance = getattr(self, 'instance', None)
        if instance:
            return instance.sku
        else:
            return self.cleaned_data.get('sku', None)

This way the browser won't let the user change the field, and will always POST as it it was left blank. We then override the clean method to set the field's value to be what was originally in the instance.

  • I tried to use it as form in TabularInline, but failed because attrs were shared between widget instances and all but the first row, including the newly added, rendered read only. – dhill Apr 1 '16 at 9:58
  • A great (update) solution! Unfortunately this and the rest have issues when there are form errors as all "disabled" values get emptied. – Michael Thompson May 23 '16 at 6:48

For Django 1.2+, you can override the field like so:

sku = forms.CharField(widget = forms.TextInput(attrs={'readonly':'readonly'}))
  • 5
    This does not allow the field to be edited at add time either, which is what the original question is about. – Matt S. Feb 28 '11 at 5:36
  • This is the answer that I'm looking for. Field disabled doesn't do what I want because it disables the field, but also removes label / make it invisible. – sivabudh Jun 29 '16 at 13:33

I made a MixIn class which you may inherit to be able to add a read_only iterable field which will disable and secure fields on the non-first edit:

(Based on Daniel's and Muhuk's answers)

from django import forms
from django.db.models.manager import Manager

# I used this instead of lambda expression after scope problems
def _get_cleaner(form, field):
    def clean_field():
         value = getattr(form.instance, field, None)
         if issubclass(type(value), Manager):
             value = value.all()
         return value
    return clean_field

class ROFormMixin(forms.BaseForm):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(ROFormMixin, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        if hasattr(self, "read_only"):
            if self.instance and self.instance.pk:
                for field in self.read_only:
                    self.fields[field].widget.attrs['readonly'] = "readonly"
                    setattr(self, "clean_" + field, _get_cleaner(self, field))

# Basic usage
class TestForm(AModelForm, ROFormMixin):
    read_only = ('sku', 'an_other_field')

I've just created the simplest possible widget for a readonly field - I don't really see why forms don't have this already:

class ReadOnlyWidget(widgets.Widget):
    """Some of these values are read only - just a bit of text..."""
    def render(self, _, value, attrs=None):
        return value

In the form:

my_read_only = CharField(widget=ReadOnlyWidget())

Very simple - and gets me just output. Handy in a formset with a bunch of read only values. Of course - you could also be a bit more clever and give it a div with the attrs so you can append classes to it.

  • 1
    Looks sexy, but how to handle foreign key? – Andrzej Kostański Apr 8 '15 at 14:00
  • Make that unicode(value) in the return instead perhaps. Assuming the unicode dunder is sensible, you'd then get that. – Danny Staple Apr 8 '15 at 15:24
  • For foreign keys, you'll need to add a "model" attribute and use "get(value)". Check my gist – shadi Jul 4 '17 at 14:30

I ran across a similar problem. It looks like I was able to solve it by defining a "get_readonly_fields" method in my ModelAdmin class.

Something like this:

# In the admin.py file

class ItemAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):

    def get_readonly_display(self, request, obj=None):
        if obj:
            return ['sku']
        else:
            return []

The nice thing is that obj will be None when you are adding a new Item, or it will be the object being edited when you are changing an existing Item.

get_readonly_display is documented here: http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.2/ref/contrib/admin/#modeladmin-methods

As a useful addition to Humphrey's post, I had some issues with django-reversion, because it still registered disabled fields as 'changed'. The following code fixes the problem.

class ItemForm(ModelForm):

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(ItemForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        instance = getattr(self, 'instance', None)
        if instance and instance.id:
            self.fields['sku'].required = False
            self.fields['sku'].widget.attrs['disabled'] = 'disabled'

    def clean_sku(self):
        # As shown in the above answer.
        instance = getattr(self, 'instance', None)
        if instance:
            try:
                self.changed_data.remove('sku')
            except ValueError, e:
                pass
            return instance.sku
        else:
            return self.cleaned_data.get('sku', None)

As I can't yet comment (muhuk's solution), I'll response as a separate answer. This is a complete code example, that worked for me:

def clean_sku(self):
  if self.instance and self.instance.pk:
    return self.instance.sku
  else:
    return self.cleaned_data['sku']

I was going into the same problem so I created a Mixin that seems to work for my use cases.

class ReadOnlyFieldsMixin(object):
    readonly_fields =()

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(ReadOnlyFieldsMixin, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        for field in (field for name, field in self.fields.iteritems() if name in self.readonly_fields):
            field.widget.attrs['disabled'] = 'true'
            field.required = False

    def clean(self):
        cleaned_data = super(ReadOnlyFieldsMixin,self).clean()
        for field in self.readonly_fields:
           cleaned_data[field] = getattr(self.instance, field)

        return cleaned_data

Usage, just define which ones must be read only:

class MyFormWithReadOnlyFields(ReadOnlyFieldsMixin, MyForm):
    readonly_fields = ('field1', 'field2', 'fieldx')
  • I suppose it's a bit more readable than my own mixin I suggested here. Even probably more efficient, as those cleans don't raise validations errors… – christophe31 Mar 21 '15 at 17:09
  • I get an error: 'collections.OrderedDict' object has no attribute 'iteritems' – geoidesic Aug 23 at 15:52

One simple option is to just type form.instance.fieldName in the template instead of form.fieldName.

Yet again, I am going to offer one more solution :) I was using Humphrey's code, so this is based off of that.

However, I ran into issues with the field being a ModelChoiceField. Everything would work on the first request. However, if the formset tried to add a new item and failed validation, something was going wrong with the "existing" forms where the SELECTED option was being reset to the default "---------".

Anyway, I couldn't figure out how to fix that. So instead, (and I think this is actually cleaner in the form), I made the fields HiddenInputField(). This just means you have to do a little more work in the template.

So the fix for me was to simplify the Form:

class ItemForm(ModelForm):

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(ItemForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        instance = getattr(self, 'instance', None)
        if instance and instance.id:
            self.fields['sku'].widget=HiddenInput()

And then in the template, you'll need to do some manual looping of the formset.

So, in this case you would do something like this in the template:

<div>
    {{ form.instance.sku }} <!-- This prints the value -->
    {{ form }} <!-- Prints form normally, and makes the hidden input -->
</div>

This worked a little better for me and with less form manipulation.

Two more (similar) approaches with one generalized example:

1) first approach - removing field in save() method, e.g. (not tested ;) ):

def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
    for fname in self.readonly_fields:
        if fname in self.cleaned_data:
            del self.cleaned_data[fname]
    return super(<form-name>, self).save(*args,**kwargs)

2) second approach - reset field to initial value in clean method:

def clean_<fieldname>(self):
    return self.initial[<fieldname>] # or getattr(self.instance, fieldname)

Based on second approach I generalized it like this:

from functools                 import partial

class <Form-name>(...):

    def __init__(self, ...):
        ...
        super(<Form-name>, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        ...
        for i, (fname, field) in enumerate(self.fields.iteritems()):
            if fname in self.readonly_fields:
                field.widget.attrs['readonly'] = "readonly"
                field.required = False
                # set clean method to reset value back
                clean_method_name = "clean_%s" % fname
                assert clean_method_name not in dir(self)
                setattr(self, clean_method_name, partial(self._clean_for_readonly_field, fname=fname))

    def _clean_for_readonly_field(self, fname):
        """ will reset value to initial - nothing will be changed 
            needs to be added dynamically - partial, see init_fields
        """
        return self.initial[fname] # or getattr(self.instance, fieldname)

if your need multiple read-only fields.you can use any of methods given below

method 1

class ItemForm(ModelForm):
    readonly = ('sku',)

    def __init__(self, *arg, **kwrg):
        super(ItemForm, self).__init__(*arg, **kwrg)
        for x in self.readonly:
            self.fields[x].widget.attrs['disabled'] = 'disabled'

    def clean(self):
        data = super(ItemForm, self).clean()
        for x in self.readonly:
            data[x] = getattr(self.instance, x)
        return data

method 2

inheritance method

class AdvancedModelForm(ModelForm):


    def __init__(self, *arg, **kwrg):
        super(AdvancedModelForm, self).__init__(*arg, **kwrg)
        if hasattr(self, 'readonly'):
            for x in self.readonly:
                self.fields[x].widget.attrs['disabled'] = 'disabled'

    def clean(self):
        data = super(AdvancedModelForm, self).clean()
        if hasattr(self, 'readonly'):
            for x in self.readonly:
                data[x] = getattr(self.instance, x)
        return data


class ItemForm(AdvancedModelForm):
    readonly = ('sku',)

How I do it with Django 1.11 :

class ItemForm(ModelForm):
    disabled_fields = ('added_by',)

    class Meta:
        model = Item
        fields = '__all__'

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(ItemForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        for field in self.disabled_fields:
            self.fields[field].disabled = True

For the Admin version, I think this is a more compact way if you have more than one field:

def get_readonly_fields(self, request, obj=None):
    skips = ('sku', 'other_field')
    fields = super(ItemAdmin, self).get_readonly_fields(request, obj)

    if not obj:
        return [field for field in fields if not field in skips]
    return fields

Based on Yamikep's answer, I found a better and very simple solution which also handles ModelMultipleChoiceField fields.

Removing field from form.cleaned_data prevents fields from being saved:

class ReadOnlyFieldsMixin(object):
    readonly_fields = ()

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(ReadOnlyFieldsMixin, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        for field in (field for name, field in self.fields.iteritems() if
                      name in self.readonly_fields):
            field.widget.attrs['disabled'] = 'true'
            field.required = False

    def clean(self):
        for f in self.readonly_fields:
            self.cleaned_data.pop(f, None)
        return super(ReadOnlyFieldsMixin, self).clean()

Usage:

class MyFormWithReadOnlyFields(ReadOnlyFieldsMixin, MyForm):
    readonly_fields = ('field1', 'field2', 'fieldx')

Here is a slightly more involved version, based on christophe31's answer. It does not rely on the "readonly" attribute. This makes its problems, like select boxes still being changeable and datapickers still popping up, go away.

Instead, it wraps the form fields widget in a readonly widget, thus making the form still validate. The content of the original widget is displayed inside <span class="hidden"></span> tags. If the widget has a render_readonly() method it uses that as the visible text, otherwise it parses the HTML of the original widget and tries to guess the best representation.

import django.forms.widgets as f
import xml.etree.ElementTree as etree
from django.utils.safestring import mark_safe

def make_readonly(form):
    """
    Makes all fields on the form readonly and prevents it from POST hacks.
    """

    def _get_cleaner(_form, field):
        def clean_field():
            return getattr(_form.instance, field, None)
        return clean_field

    for field_name in form.fields.keys():
        form.fields[field_name].widget = ReadOnlyWidget(
            initial_widget=form.fields[field_name].widget)
        setattr(form, "clean_" + field_name, 
                _get_cleaner(form, field_name))

    form.is_readonly = True

class ReadOnlyWidget(f.Select):
    """
    Renders the content of the initial widget in a hidden <span>. If the
    initial widget has a ``render_readonly()`` method it uses that as display
    text, otherwise it tries to guess by parsing the html of the initial widget.
    """

    def __init__(self, initial_widget, *args, **kwargs):
        self.initial_widget = initial_widget
        super(ReadOnlyWidget, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

    def render(self, *args, **kwargs):
        def guess_readonly_text(original_content):
            root = etree.fromstring("<span>%s</span>" % original_content)

            for element in root:
                if element.tag == 'input':
                    return element.get('value')

                if element.tag == 'select':
                    for option in element:
                        if option.get('selected'):
                            return option.text

                if element.tag == 'textarea':
                    return element.text

            return "N/A"

        original_content = self.initial_widget.render(*args, **kwargs)
        try:
            readonly_text = self.initial_widget.render_readonly(*args, **kwargs)
        except AttributeError:
            readonly_text = guess_readonly_text(original_content)

        return mark_safe("""<span class="hidden">%s</span>%s""" % (
            original_content, readonly_text))

# Usage example 1.
self.fields['my_field'].widget = ReadOnlyWidget(self.fields['my_field'].widget)

# Usage example 2.
form = MyForm()
make_readonly(form)

Is this the simplest way?

Right in a view code something like this:

def resume_edit(request, r_id):
    .....    
    r = Resume.get.object(pk=r_id)
    resume = ResumeModelForm(instance=r)
    .....
    resume.fields['email'].widget.attrs['readonly'] = True 
    .....
    return render(request, 'resumes/resume.html', context)

It works fine!

  • Try formatting your code using tools provided. – Polynomial Feb 2 '14 at 16:03

I solved this problem like this:

    class UploadFileForm(forms.ModelForm):
     class Meta:
      model = FileStorage
      fields = '__all__'
      widgets = {'patient': forms.HiddenInput()}

in views:

form = UploadFileForm(request.POST, request.FILES, instance=patient, initial={'patient': patient})

It's all.

For django 1.9+
You can use Fields disabled argument to make field disable. e.g. In following code snippet from forms.py file , I have made employee_code field disabled

class EmployeeForm(forms.ModelForm):
    employee_code = forms.CharField(disabled=True)
    class Meta:
        model = Employee
        fields = ('employee_code', 'designation', 'salary')

Reference https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/2.0/ref/forms/fields/#disabled

If you are using Django admin, here is the simplest solution.

class ReadonlyFieldsMixin(object):
    def get_readonly_fields(self, request, obj=None):
        if obj:
            return super(ReadonlyFieldsMixin, self).get_readonly_fields(request, obj)
        else:
            return tuple()

class MyAdmin(ReadonlyFieldsMixin, ModelAdmin):
    readonly_fields = ('sku',)
  • Note that list_editable ignores readonly_fields. – xj9 Jun 4 '15 at 17:40

I think your best option would just be to include the readonly attribute in your template rendered in a <span> or <p> rather than include it in the form if it's readonly.

Forms are for collecting data, not displaying it. That being said, the options to display in a readonly widget and scrub POST data are fine solutions.

If you are working with Django ver < 1.9 (the 1.9 has added Field.disabled attribute) you could try to add following decorator to your form __init__ method:

def bound_data_readonly(_, initial):
    return initial


def to_python_readonly(field):
    native_to_python = field.to_python

    def to_python_filed(_):
        return native_to_python(field.initial)

    return to_python_filed


def disable_read_only_fields(init_method):

    def init_wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        self = args[0]
        init_method(*args, **kwargs)
        for field in self.fields.values():
            if field.widget.attrs.get('readonly', None):
                field.widget.attrs['disabled'] = True
                setattr(field, 'bound_data', bound_data_readonly)
                setattr(field, 'to_python', to_python_readonly(field))

    return init_wrapper


class YourForm(forms.ModelForm):

    @disable_read_only_fields
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        ...

The main idea is that if field is readonly you don't need any other value except initial.

P.S: Don't forget to set yuor_form_field.widget.attrs['readonly'] = True

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