21

I came accross the following code:

# O(n) space       
def rotate(self, nums, k):
    deque = collections.deque(nums)
    k %= len(nums)
    for _ in xrange(k):
        deque.appendleft(deque.pop())
    nums[:] = list(deque) # <- Code in question

What does nums[:] = do that nums = does not? For that matter, what does nums[:] do that nums does not?

3
  • Asked and answered I believe. What does [:] in Python mean – CollinD Sep 8 '15 at 2:38
  • 1
    @CollinD Didn't see that question, thanks. But still doesn't answer the assignment question – sinθ Sep 8 '15 at 2:39
  • I had voted to reopen because I didn't think the linked duplicate explained slice assignment. I must have opened the wrong link, because it definitely does explain slice assignment. – Josh Smeaton Sep 8 '15 at 3:30
46

This syntax is a slice assignment. A slice of [:] means the entire list. The difference between nums[:] = and nums = is that the latter doesn't replace elements in the original list. This is observable when there are two references to the list

>>> original = [1, 2, 3]
>>> other = original
>>> original[:] = [0, 0] # changes the contents of the list that both
                         # original and other refer to 
>>> other # see below, now you can see the change through other
[0, 0]

To see the difference just remove the [:] from the assignment above.

>>> original = [1, 2, 3]
>>> other = original
>>> original = [0, 0] # original now refers to a different list than other
>>> other # other remains the same
[1, 2, 3]

To take the title of your question literally, if list is a variable name and not the builtin, it will replace the length of the sequence with an ellipsis

>>> list = [1,2,3,4]
>>> list[:] = [...]
>>> list
[Ellipsis]
6
  • Simply say, (list[:] = ...) is value type but (list = ...) is reference type – Brady Huang Feb 6 '18 at 10:01
  • 1
    @Brady Huang that doesn't describe this accurately – Ryan Haining Feb 6 '18 at 17:11
  • 1
    you are saying that slice notation list[:] means the reference, while the list means the copy? then why in for in list: if you pass the list itself and you insert some element inside the loop, this loop will never end because since its incrementing its length it will be forever. it means if yo'u pass list without[:] you are passing the reference. that's contradictory huh – vincent thorpe Jul 18 '19 at 8:29
  • the [:] operator if you put Lvalue or Rvalue it means different – vincent thorpe Jul 18 '19 at 10:33
  • 2
    @vincentthorpe lst[:] not followed by an = calls __getitem__, while lst[:] = calls __setitem__, so [] and []= are best thought of as two different operators – Ryan Haining Jul 18 '19 at 16:50
6

nums = foo rebinds the name nums to refer to the same object that foo refers to.

nums[:] = foo invokes slice assignment on the object that nums refers to, thus making the contents of the original object a copy of the contents of foo.

Try this:

>>> a = [1,2]
>>> b = [3,4,5]
>>> c = a
>>> c = b
>>> print(a)
[1, 2]
>>> c = a
>>> c[:] = b
>>> print(a)
[3, 4, 5]

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