0

This question already has an answer here:

Is there a way to tell maven to pick the latest version of a jar as long as major version remains the same? For example, instead of the following:

    <dependency>
        <groupId>com.example</groupId>
        <artifactId>example-java-sdk</artifactId>
        <version>1.0.1</version>
    </dependency>

I'd like to use the following:

    <dependency>
        <groupId>com.example</groupId>
        <artifactId>example-java-sdk</artifactId>
        <version>1.*</version>
    </dependency>

Or:

    <dependency>
        <groupId>com.example</groupId>
        <artifactId>example-java-sdk</artifactId>
        <version>1</version>
    </dependency>

That way, I can update the minor version or revision without having to ask everyone to change their dependencies. The latest jar (with the same major version) will be picked up the next time they rebuild their application.

marked as duplicate by Stephen C java Sep 8 '15 at 7:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • It depends what you like achieve with this? Is your pom consumed by others? So it might be possible to use a <scope>provided</scope> And others can decide what to use? – khmarbaise Sep 8 '15 at 7:15
  • You can specify excluded interval bounds, i.e. [1.0, 2.0), meaning from and including 1.0 and up to but excluding 2.0. Is this sufficient? – dhke Sep 8 '15 at 7:19
  • 1
    I think this entry pretty much sums it up: stackoverflow.com/questions/30571/… – Daniel Sep 8 '15 at 7:22
  • @khmarbaise: Yes, I am writing an SDK for my application - and I don't want my users to manually choose a particular version every time I fix a bug or refactor my code while keeping the interface the same. – Satyen Rai Sep 8 '15 at 7:26
  • Then you should use the provided scope which makes it easier. In your own environment you can select a particular version and your users can choose what they like to use. The version range is not a good choice in this case. – khmarbaise Sep 8 '15 at 7:29

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.