8

Is it possible to find the non nan values of a vector but also allowing n number of nans? For example, if I have the following data:

X = [18 3 nan nan 8 10 11 nan 9 14 6 1 4 23 24]; %// input array
thres = 1; % this is the number of nans to allow

and I would like to only keep the longest sequence of values with non nans but allow 'n' number of nans to be kept in the data. So, say that I am willing to keep 1 nan I would have an output of

X_out = [8 10 11 nan 9 14 6 1 4 23 24]; %// output array

Thats is, the two nans at the beginning have been removed becuase they exceed the values in 'thres' above, but the third nan is on its own thus can be kept in the data. I would like to develop a method where thres can be defined as any value.

I can find the non nan values with

Y = ~isnan(X); %// convert to zeros and ones

Any ideas?

  • This sounds tricky. You could take each nan, replace them one-by-one with a non-nan, and search for the longest non-nan sequence in each modified vector, then select the longest. But this is cumbersome, I don't know if there's an easier way. Oh, and my example assumed thres=1. You would have to do a statistical combination to switch your nans with non-nans. – Andras Deak Sep 8 '15 at 11:52
  • 1
    when you delete data, do you delete up to the last NaN or up to the beginning of the Vector? – GameOfThrows Sep 8 '15 at 12:49
  • Delete up to the last nan. – Emma Tebbs Sep 8 '15 at 20:11
8

In order to find the longest sequence containing at most threshold times NaN we must find the start and the end of said sequence(s).

To generate all possible start points, we can use hankel:

H = hankel(X)

H =

    18     3   NaN   NaN     8    10    11   NaN     9    14     6     1     4    23    24
     3   NaN   NaN     8    10    11   NaN     9    14     6     1     4    23    24     0
   NaN   NaN     8    10    11   NaN     9    14     6     1     4    23    24     0     0
   NaN     8    10    11   NaN     9    14     6     1     4    23    24     0     0     0
     8    10    11   NaN     9    14     6     1     4    23    24     0     0     0     0
    10    11   NaN     9    14     6     1     4    23    24     0     0     0     0     0
    11   NaN     9    14     6     1     4    23    24     0     0     0     0     0     0
   NaN     9    14     6     1     4    23    24     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     9    14     6     1     4    23    24     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
    14     6     1     4    23    24     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     6     1     4    23    24     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     1     4    23    24     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     4    23    24     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
    23    24     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
    24     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0 

Now we need to find the last valid element in each row. To do so, we can use cumsum:

C = cumsum(isnan(H),2)

C =

     0     0     1     2     2     2     2     3     3     3     3     3     3     3     3
     0     1     2     2     2     2     3     3     3     3     3     3     3     3     3
     1     2     2     2     2     3     3     3     3     3     3     3     3     3     3
     1     1     1     1     2     2     2     2     2     2     2     2     2     2     2
     0     0     0     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
     0     0     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
     0     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0

The end point for each row is the one, where the corresponding element in C is at most threshold:

threshold = 1;

T = C<=threshold

T =

 1     1     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
 1     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
 1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
 1     1     1     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
 1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
 1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
 1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
 1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
 1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
 1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
 1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
 1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
 1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
 1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
 1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1

The last valid element is found using:

[~,idx]=sort(T,2);
lastone=idx(:,end)

lastone =

 3     2     1     4    15    15    15    15    15    15    15    15    15    15    15

We must make sure that the actual length of each row is respected:

lengths = length(X):-1:1;
real_length = min(lastone,lengths);
[max_length,max_idx] = max(real_length)


max_length =

     11


max_idx =

     5

In case there are more sequences of equal maximum length, we just take the first and display it:

selected_max_idx = max_idx(1);
H(selected_max_idx, 1:max_length)


ans =

 8    10    11   NaN     9    14     6     1     4    23    24

full script

X = [18 3 nan nan 8 10 11 nan 9 14 6 1 4 23 24];

H = hankel(X);
C = cumsum(isnan(H),2);

threshold = 1;

T = C<=threshold;
[~,idx]=sort(T,2);
lastone=idx(:,end)';

lengths = length(X):-1:1;
real_length = min(lastone,lengths);
[max_length,max_idx] = max(real_length);

selected_max_idx = max_idx(1);
H(selected_max_idx, 1:max_length)
  • Sorry but it seems that this algorithm is not robust enough, for example with X = [18 3 nan nan nan nan 9 14 6 1 4 23 24] and threshold = 3. – marsei Sep 8 '15 at 14:01
  • @macduf I get NaN NaN NaN 9 14 6 1 4 23 24, what would you expect? – m.s. Sep 8 '15 at 14:03
  • @macduff tbh, the OP was not very clear on exactly where/to which extent to delete, so I do not think this is a question of robustness. – GameOfThrows Sep 8 '15 at 14:09
  • sure - I understood that the question was "find longest sequence of non nan values", therefore excluding the NaN from results. But it 's kind of dummy thing, the core being find the sequence. well done for solving this tricky problem. – marsei Sep 8 '15 at 14:13
  • This is a rather long, complicated approach to what should be a simple algorithm. Granted I'm biased towards rle (see my answer), but you really shouldn't need to resort to such large matrices. – Carl Witthoft Sep 8 '15 at 15:43
5

Approach 1: convolution

One possible approach is to convolve Y = double(~isnan(X)); with a window of n ones, where n is decreased by until an acceptable subsequence is found. "Acceptable" means that the subsequence contains at least n-thres ones, that is, the convolution gives at least n-thres.

Y = double(~isnan(X));
for n = numel(Y):-1:1 %// try all possible sequence lengths
    w = find(conv(Y,ones(1,n),'valid')>=n-thres); %// is there any acceptable subsequence?
    if ~isempty(w)
        break
    end
end
result = X(w:w+n-1);

Aproach 2: cumulative sum

Convolving Y with a window of n ones (as in approach 1) is equivalent to computing a cumulative sum of Y and then taking differences with n spacing. This is more efficient in terms of number of operations.

Y = double(~isnan(X));
Z = cumsum(Y);
for n = numel(Y):-1:1
    w = find([Z(n) Z(n+1:end)-Z(1:end-n)]>=n-thres);
    if ~isempty(w)
        break
    end
end
result = X(w:w+n-1);

Approach 3: 2D convolution

This essentially computes all iterations of the loop in approach 1 at once.

Y = double(~isnan(X));
z = conv2(Y, tril(ones(numel(Y))));
[nn, ww] = find(bsxfun(@ge, z, (1:numel(Y)).'-thres)); %'
[n, ind] = max(nn);
w = ww(ind)-n+1;
result = X(w:w+n-1);
  • The cumulative sum was what I was aiming for, but this is much nicer coded. – GameOfThrows Sep 8 '15 at 14:12
1

Let's try my favorite tool: RLE. Matlab doesn't have a direct function, so use my "seqle" posted to exchange central. Seqle's default is to return run length encoding. So:

>> foo = [ nan 1 2 3 nan nan 4 5 6 nan 5 5 5 ];

>> seqle(isnan(foo))
ans = 
    run: [1 3 2 3 1 3]
    val: [1 0 1 0 1 0]

The "run" indicates the length of the current run; "val" indicates the value. In this case, val==1 indicates the value is nan and val==0 indicates numeric values. You can see it'll be relatively easy to extract the longest sequence of "run" values meeting the condition val==0 | run < 2 to get no more than one nan in a row. Then just grab the cumulative indices of that run and that's the subset of foo you want.

EDIT: sadly, what's trivial to find by eye may not be so easy to extract via code. I suspect there's a much faster way to use the indices identified by longrun to get the desired subsequence.

>> foo = [ nan 1 2 3 nan nan 4 5 6 nan nan 5 5 nan 5 nan 4 7 4 nan ];
>>  sfoo= seqle(isnan(foo))
sfoo = 
    run: [1 3 2 3 2 2 1 1 1 3 1]
    val: [1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1]
>> longrun = sfoo.run<2 |sfoo.val==0
longlong = 
    run: [2 1 1 1 6]
    val: [1 0 1 0 1]
% longrun identifies which indices might be part of a run
% longlong identifies the longest sequence of valid run 
>> longlong = seqle(longrun)
>> lfoo = find(sfoo.run<2 |sfoo.val==0);
>> sbar = seqle(lfoo,1);
>> maxind=find(sbar.run==max(sbar.run),1,'first');
>> getlfoo = lfoo( sum(sbar.run(1:(maxind-1)))+1 ); 
% first value in longrun , which is  part of max run
% getbar finds end of run indices
>> getbar = getlfoo:(getlfoo+sbar.run(maxind)-1);
>> getsbar = sfoo.run(getbar);
% retrieve indices of input vector 
>> startit = sum(sfoo.run(1:(getbar(1)-1))) +1;
>> endit = startit+ ((sum(sfoo.run(getbar(1):getbar(end ) ) ) ) )-1;
>> therun = foo( startit:endit )
therun =
     5     5   NaN     5   NaN     4     7     4   NaN
  • can you post a full example? – m.s. Sep 9 '15 at 9:11
  • @m.s. pretty ugly but here's one way. – Carl Witthoft Sep 9 '15 at 12:28
0

Hmmm, who doesn't like challenges, my solution is not as good as m.s.'s, but it is an alternative.

X = [18 3 nan nan 8 10 11 nan 9 14 6 1 4 23 24]; %// input array
thresh =1;
X(isnan(X))= 0 ;

for i = 1:thresh
    Y(i,:) = circshift(X',-i); %//circular shift
end 

For some reason, the Matlab invert " ' " makes the formatting looks weird.

D = X + sum(Y,1);

Discard = find(D==0)+thresh; %//give you the index of the part that needs to be discarded

chunk = find(X==0); %//Segment the Vector into segments delimited by NaNs

seriesOfZero = circshift(chunk',-1)' - chunk;

bigchunk =[1 chunk( find(seriesOfZero ~= 1)) size(X,2)]; %//Convert series of NaNs into 1 chunk

[values,DiscardChunk] = intersect(bigchunk,Discard);
DiscardChunk =  sort(DiscardChunk,'descend')

for t = 1:size(DiscardChunk,2)
  X(bigchunk(DiscardChunk(t)-1):bigchunk(DiscardChunk(t))) = []; %//Discard the data
end
X(X == 0) = NaN
%//End of Code

8 10 11 NaN 9 14 6 1 4 23 24

When: X = [18 3 nan nan nan 8 10 11 nan nan 9 14 6 1 nan nan nan 4 23 24]; %// input array thresh =2;

8 10 11 NaN 4 23 24

  • I just tried your code with your second example (X = [18 3 nan nan nan 8 10 11 nan nan 9 14 6 1 nan nan nan 4 23 24];), but the result was 18 3 NaN NaN NaN 8 10 11 NaN 4 23 24; and running the first example with thresh=2 resulted in Index exceeds matrix dimensions. – m.s. Sep 8 '15 at 13:50
  • @m.s. works fine here, did you clear the previous results? – GameOfThrows Sep 8 '15 at 14:01
  • @m.s. weird, I have R2011b and it is working for both examples. What's breaking it? – GameOfThrows Sep 8 '15 at 14:06
  • I have R2015a, don't know what causes the problem – m.s. Sep 8 '15 at 14:08
  • @m.s. maybe a functional error - circshift I suspect, but I am not sure... but it is working on 2011b which is weird. – GameOfThrows Sep 8 '15 at 14:12

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