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I have a question of JS arrays.

Example:

var fullArr = [1,2,3,4];
var partArr = [2,3];
var newArr = [];

We have a main array fullArr and a partial array partarr. I want to create a function/filter, which is looking for existing items in fullArr and not in partArr. In this example above newArr must be equal to [1,4].

I've tried doing something like this, but it's not working properly.

for (var k in fullArray) {   // [1,2,3,4]
  for (var j in selectedArray) {  // [1,4]
    if (fullArray[k] == selectedArray[j]) {
      newArray.splice(selectedArray[j] - 1, 1); // must be [2,3]
      break;
    } 
  }
}

What is a good way of making this? Thanks.

3
  • but it's not working properly how's it not working? What result does it give you? Sep 8, 2015 at 13:41
  • A side note, it probably doesn't matter with your code in particular, but in general, it's a bad idea to use for...in with an array because the order isn't guaranteed. Use a regular for loop. Sep 8, 2015 at 13:43
  • Using Array.filter is the easier solution, but you might also want to look at the documentation for Array.splice because you aren't using it right. But since you are (presumably) trying to add an item to newArr, it would be easier to do with push. Sep 8, 2015 at 13:48

5 Answers 5

5

Here's one

var newArr = fullArr.filter(function(f) { // The filter() method creates a new array with all elements that pass the test implemented by the provided function.
    return partArr.indexOf(f) == -1; // The indexOf() method returns the first index at which a given element can be found in the array, or -1 if it is not present.
})

to impress the girls, you can also

var newArr = fullArr.filter(function(f) {
    return !~partArr.indexOf(f);
})
4
  • A little explanation would probably improve your answer Sep 8, 2015 at 13:42
  • really? Array.filter and Array.indexOf should be the bread and butter of newbie javascript programmers Sep 8, 2015 at 13:43
  • Well clearly they aren't to the OP. So maybe you can help them out a little? Or else, why did you bother answering? Sep 8, 2015 at 13:44
  • @MattBurland you know, I've answered many questions where the OP responds "oh, of course, I should've seen that" ... can't win :p - explanations added, totally plagiarised from mdn :p Sep 8, 2015 at 13:46
2

Here is the code for your requirement.

var fullArr = [1,2,3,4];
var partArr = [2,3];
var newArr = [];

for(var i=0;i<fullArr.length;i++){
   if(partArr.indexOf(fullArr[i]) == -1)
      newArr.push(fullArr[i]);
};

Here is the working Link

Hope it works :)

1

You can use the filter() function that works on arrays:

var newArr = fullArr.filter(function(val, i, arr) {
  return partArr.indexOf(val) === -1;
});

This will return a new array containing the values of every iteration that returns true.

Should you ever need to do this on an object in the future a great way is to first convert the object keys to an array and then run the filter:

Object.keys(myObj).function(val, i, arr) {
  return partArr.indexOf(val) === -1;
});
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  • Thanks for the explanation!
    – Fleeck
    Sep 8, 2015 at 13:48
1

Here are few other approaches:

var fullArr = [1,2,3,4];
var partArr = [2,3];
var newArr = [];

1. 
fullArr.map(function(element){
  if(partArr.indexOf(element) === -1) newArr.push(element);
})
console.log(newArr);

2. 
for(i in fullArr){
   if(partArr.indexOf(fullArr[i]) === -1) newArr.push(fullArr[i]);
}
console.log(newArr);

3.
fullArr.forEach(function(element){
    if(partArr.indexOf(element) === -1) newArr.push(element);
})

console.log(newArr);
1

In fact, you want a common part between arrays. Obviously you can choose splice or indexOf to have O(n * m) or even O(m * n^2) performance. It's obviously suboptimal for any array larger than few elements

Or you can use objects as hash maps to find differences in (in worst case) O(n + m log m):

var fullArr = [1,2,3,4];
var partArr = [2,3];
var temporaryObject = Object.create(null);
partArr.forEach(el=>temporaryObject[el] = true); // temporaryObject after this operation is {"2": true, "3": true}
var newArr = fullArr.filter(el=>temporaryObject[el]);

In this example I have used ES6 feature called "arrow functions". It translates to following ES5 code:

var partArr = [2, 3];
var temporaryObject = Object.create(null);
partArr.forEach(function (el) {
    temporaryObject[el] = true;
}); // temporaryObject after this operation is {"2": true, "3": true}
var newArr = fullArr.filter(function (el) {
    return temporaryObject[el];
});
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