2

Assume a new iOS project, just with a navigation controller (correctly wired as entry point) and an overridden viewDidAppear() containing the following three lines of code:

            self.presentViewController(UIViewController(), animated: true, completion: nil)
            self.dismissViewControllerAnimated(true, completion: {})
            self.presentViewController(UIViewController(), animated: true, completion: nil)

When executed, that code will raise a warning "Attempt to present UIViewController while a presentation is in progress!" when attempting to present the second controller.

Question: What exactly am I missing in order to dismiss the controller correctly before calling another controller?

  • If you want to dismiss a controller and then do some follow on action, put all the follow on code in the completion handler for the dismiss. Sounds like you tried to present a new controller before the dismiss had completed? – Rory McKinnel Sep 8 '15 at 14:54
  • Sorry but somehow I cannot find any information which "follow on code" to place in the completion handler in order to allow old controller to be dismissed. Or do you mean I need to place some kind of buy waiting code inside that handler in order to be sure the controller has been dismissed before calling the next controller? – Basti Sep 8 '15 at 15:43
  • FIY: I improved the question after Rory McKinnel has left a comment – Basti Sep 8 '15 at 16:16
  • Nothing I tried works. It can't be that difficult to invoke another lousy controller! I guess I must be missing something basic. I hope someone can help, it's just ridiculous to have such a long lasting problem with just three lines code which is as basic as it can get – Basti Sep 8 '15 at 16:24
  • 1
    From your new code you need to put each line in the completion handler of the line before, although the sequence makes little sense to me. – Rory McKinnel Sep 8 '15 at 16:41
0

You'll need to add some sort of delay on that initial presentViewController call as illustrated below:

override func viewDidAppear(animated: Bool) {
    presentViewController(UIViewController(), animated: true) { () -> Void in
        self.delay(0.1, closure: { () -> () in
            self.dismissViewControllerAnimated(true, completion: nil)
        })
    }
}


func delay(delay:Double, closure:()->()) {
    dispatch_after(
        dispatch_time(
            DISPATCH_TIME_NOW,
            Int64(delay * Double(NSEC_PER_SEC))
        ),
        dispatch_get_main_queue(), closure)
}

It seems the completion block is called before the animation is truly complete.

| improve this answer | |
  • it helps to get rid of thwarting. However, when replacing existing presentViewController() calls with your suggestion the related screens are being loaded over and over again. – Basti Sep 8 '15 at 17:18
  • And I also get another problem: The second controller's view is "not in the window hierarchy". However, when eliminating the first controller from the code no such message is prompted. How does eliminating the first controller from the code make the second controllers view appear in the window hierarchy? I don't get it (yet). – Basti Sep 8 '15 at 17:21
  • that problem already exists when calling two generic controllers as described, using your code suggestion: override func viewDidAppear(animated: Bool) { presentViewController(UIViewController(), animated: true) { () -> Void in self.delay(0.1, closure: { () -> () in self.dismissViewControllerAnimated(true, completion: nil) }) } presentViewController(UIViewController(), animated: true) { () -> Void in self.delay(0.1, closure: { () -> () in self.dismissViewControllerAnimated(true, completion: nil) }) } } – Basti Sep 8 '15 at 17:27
0

Assuming you want the main controller to appear, present a controller, dismiss the controller, present again and dismiss then you need to chain the actions so they happen in order.

To prevent it spinning forever, you also need to only run the code when the main controller appears for the first time.

I'm no swift coder, but something like the following should work. There is a check to make sure the controller is being presented or being pushed on and then it runs the sequence using each operations completion to start the next. This guard should make sure that following each dismiss when viewDidAppear gets called that it does not do anything on those occasions.

var firstTime = true;

func presentThenDismiss(finalCompletion: (() -> Void)?)
{
    presentViewController(UIViewController(), animated: true, completion : { [weak self] Void in
        // On completion of the present, we dismiss it
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), {
            self?.dismissViewControllerAnimated(true, completion: { Void in
                // On completion of the dismiss, we present another
                finalCompletion!()
            })
        })
    })
}

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()


    // We only run the modal presentation code when being presented or
    // being pushed on, NOT when exposed by a model dismiss or pop
    //
    if (firstTime){
        firstTime = false;

        self.presentThenDismiss { () -> Void in
            self.presentThenDismiss { () -> Void in
            }
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • The block within if (isBeingPresented() || isMovingToParentViewController()) never gets executed if placed in the viewDidAppear method of the controller acting as root controller – Basti Sep 9 '15 at 7:57
  • @Basti As this is a one off and is the root, changed example to have a flag which detects the first time the controller is seen. – Rory McKinnel Sep 9 '15 at 8:57
  • unfortunately Xcode already is unhappy with the syntax... And I don't like the idea to override a function that gets called frequently to do something that has to be done only once. Looks like a hack to me – Basti Sep 9 '15 at 10:56
  • @Basti As noted, I'm not a swift person so you might need to adjust the code. I believe it was you who asked this to happen from viewDidAppear in the question and if you want it to happen once, then you have to put a guard in as noted given viewDidAppear is called multiple times as a result of your requested present/dismiss cycle. Perhaps you need to describe your use case in the question. For now we are all just answering the question you asked which was how to get your 3 lines to work from viewDidAppear with no errors? – Rory McKinnel Sep 9 '15 at 12:32
  • Yeah, you're right. I was assuming viewDidAppear() was the right place for this because I read that in multiple locations on stack overflow... However my usecase is to instantiate and dismiss multiple controllers from one "root" controller as needed. – Basti Sep 9 '15 at 13:29

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