18

Let var o = {a:Date.now(), b:Date.now()}.

Is o.a === o.b always true? (I am mostly interested in Node.JS.)

21

No.

Before we even get into what the spec might say, Date.now can be replaced with a user-defined function at runtime. This works in both Node and browsers:

let oldNow = Date.now;
Date.now = function () {
  let wait = oldNow() + 1000;
  while (oldNow() < wait) {
    // wait one second
  }
  return oldNow();
}

With that, every invocation will take at least one second, so your two calls will never equal.

When we look at the spec for Date.now (15.9.4.4), it simply says that it returns

the time value designating the UTC date and time of the occurrence of the call to now

which provides no guarantees to two calls ever returning the same value. From what I can tell, the spec specifies that Date objects will have millisecond precision (15.9.1.1) but makes no guarantees as to accuracy.

It is likely that two calls in the same line will probably return the same time, by virtue of the underlying timer being imprecise and the two occurring within the same tick, but the spec does not appear to specify that.

  • Won't this block the event loop for a second? – MinusFour Sep 8 '15 at 14:53
  • @MinusFour Yes. It's a simple proof that Date.now might return two different values (although for a while, some very similar code was being used in Omniture and caused a number of problems). – ssube Sep 8 '15 at 14:55
  • 4
    @ssube interestingly your example shows that Date.now can also be replaced with a user-defined function at runtime, which always returns the same value, in which case the statement would always be true. Only kidding of course... – ci_ Sep 8 '15 at 14:57
9

No, try this simple test out:

var test = new Array();
for(var i=0; i<40000; i++){
  test.push({a:Date.now(), b:Date.now()});
}
for(var i=0 ; i<test.length; i++){
  if(test[i].a != test[i].b){
     console.warn('a & b !=');
  }
}

And you will see what happen !

5

Even if the two might always be equal some-JS-engine-implementation-wise, logically it's two different instants of time and that's how I would treat them.

3

If you're interested in precision, I'd suggest performance.now(). If you need them to be the same, I'd suggest writing a constructor for the object, then assigning Date.now() to a temporary variable, then assigning that value to both a and b.

Here is a Primer on the API Discovering the HR Time API

Here is some node-specific information: Node hrtime

  • 2
    Using performance.now() I can get the two values to differ! Thanks. – Randomblue Sep 8 '15 at 14:50
  • Ah, it wasn't clear from your question if the intent was to get them to differ or to be certain they were the same. Glad I could help. – Michael Blackburn Sep 8 '15 at 14:55
2

No.

There are two questions implied by your question:

  1. Is there something special about object initializers that looks at the property initializer values and "optimizes" them or something to avoid redundant calls?

  2. Will Date.now always return the same value when called twice in rapid succession?

The answers are no, and no. :-) Let's look in more detail:

Object initializers

Object initializers are handled step-by-step. This is detailed in the specification (start here), and while it was a lot easier to understand in the previous 5th edition spec, it basically says that the object is created and then the properties are added to it in source code order, one at a time. So with:

var o = {
    a: "one",
    b: "two"
};

First the JavaScript engine creates the object, then it evaluates the right-hand side of the property initializer for a ("one"), adds the a property with the resulting value, then evaluates the right-hand side of the property initializer for b ("two"), then adds the b property with the resulting value. So we know that the right-hand sides are evaluated separately, and at distinct moments in the process. Which is why with this:

var value = 0;
function unique() {
    return value++;
}
var o = {
   a: unique(),
   b: unique()
};

var value = 0;
function unique() {
    return value++;
}
var o = {
   a: unique(),
   b: unique()
};
snippet.log("o.a = " + o.a + ", o.b = " + o.b);
<!-- Script provides the `snippet` object, see http://meta.stackexchange.com/a/242144/134069 -->
<script src="http://tjcrowder.github.io/simple-snippets-console/snippet.js"></script>

...a reliably gets 0 and b reliably gets 1.

Consequently, we know that with:

var o = {
    a: Date.now(),
    b: Date.now()
};

...two calls to Date.now will be made, one after the other, in rapid succession. Time to look at that...

Date.now called in rapid succession

Two calls to Date.now, one right after another, can indeed return different values; it's not even all that rare. It's a time-based function. If you call on either side of a millisecond time change, you'll get different values. Now a millisecond is a long time to a computer, but not all that long.

We can easily prove it happens empirically:

var first, second;
var counter = 0;
snippet.log("Start");
do {
  first = Date.now();
  second = Date.now();
  ++counter;
} while (first === second);
snippet.log("Stop, values were different: " + first + " !== " + second + "; counter = " + counter);

var first, second;
var counter = 0;
snippet.log("Start");
do {
    first = Date.now();
    second = Date.now();
    ++counter;
} while (first === second);
snippet.log("Stop, values were different");
snippet.log(first + " !== " + second);
snippet.log("counter = " + counter);
<!-- Script provides the `snippet` object, see http://meta.stackexchange.com/a/242144/134069 -->
<script src="http://tjcrowder.github.io/simple-snippets-console/snippet.js"></script>

The above always stops, proving that two calls in rapid succession will return different values. For me, on Chrome on Linux, counter isn't even usually all that high (typically 4 digits, sometimes 3, sometimes 5).

We also know that it happens from the specification, which says:

The now function returns a Number value that is the time value designating the UTC date and time of the occurrence of the call to now.

(my emphasis) A complying implementation of the specification cannot, therefore, decide prior to starting a JavaScript "job" what the value of now will be and then reuse that throughout the job. That would be contrary to the spec.

Conclusion

Since we know the property initializers in the object initializer are processed one after another and that two separate calls to Date.now are made, and we know that two calls to Date.now may return different values, we know that for var o = {a:Date.now(), b:Date.now()}, o.a === o.b will not always be true, in NodeJS (e.g., V8) or any other JavaScript engine that follows the specification.

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