18

I have a SQL table with one float column populated with values like these:

  1.4313
  3.35
  2.55467
  6.22456
  3.325

I need to select rows containing only values with more than 4 decimals. In this case, the select must return:

2.55467
6.22456

Ideas? Thanks!

This is what I have tried so far

select * 
from table 
where CAST(LATITUDE AS DECIMAL(10,5)) - LATITUDE = 0
2
  • @Kaf I tried select * from table where CAST(LATITUDE AS DECIMAL(10,5)) - LATITUDE = 0 but I'm looking for alternatives. Surprisingly its not too much information about this select out there.
    – BernieSF
    Sep 8 '15 at 16:24
  • Get the decimal part using charindex() and right()/substring() functions and then check for the length of the string > 4
    – Kaf
    Sep 8 '15 at 16:31

13 Answers 13

32
DECLARE @tbl TABLE (val float)
INSERT INTO @tbl SELECT 1234.567
INSERT INTO @tbl SELECT 1234.5678
INSERT INTO @tbl SELECT -1234.5678
INSERT INTO @tbl SELECT 1234.56789

SELECT *
from @tbl
where (((val*10000) - CONVERT(INT,(val*10000))) <> 0)
4
  • Ghost, your select looks like works too, but returns some additional rows. MegaTron's select returns 2080 rows, your select 2186. Right now I'm checking which one its correct.
    – BernieSF
    Sep 8 '15 at 16:58
  • After a deep review, I found your answer its the correct. This is the only select statement who return the correct values.
    – BernieSF
    Sep 8 '15 at 17:10
  • 1
    NICE BUT, why is the ABS function needed here? (((val*10000) - CONVERT(INT,val*10000)) <> 0) works fine for me
    – CMS
    Nov 6 '18 at 23:00
  • @CMS You are correct. I had probably started it with a length comparison and realized the negative caused an extra character; the ABS is probably a carry over from that attempt. Nov 6 '18 at 23:43
10

Why cant we make it simple by this query:-

SELECT * FROM table WHERE val LIKE '%.____%'

This selects what we want

1
  • 1
    This solution does not work given the example data in my answer. Nov 6 '18 at 23:49
5

Given answers did not work for me with MaxDb, but this did:

where FLOOR(value * 10000) != value * 10000

Source

Reduce/Increase 0`s for less/more precision.

1
  • Works for me on Oracle. Another way on Oracle is: select to_char(value) from table where value != round(value,4);
    – prezervos
    Mar 21 '19 at 9:55
5

Another solution also:

SELECT * from table
where (round(value,2) - round(value,4) <> 0)
5

This works on Postgres 11:

SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE mycolumn != ROUND(mycolumn::numeric,2)
3

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/abadc/3/0

Seems like something like this should work...

all it does is convert the number to an integer to drop off decimals after multiplying it * 10 to power of decimals you need then it compares that int version of the number to the base number after it too was multiplied by 10 to the power of # of decimals.

If the numbers don't match, then you have decimals beyond 4. If they do match, then it was 4 or fewer.

Select *
      from foo
      where cast(myNum*power(10,4) as int) <> myNum*power(10,4)
1
  • This answer makes the same results as Ghots' answer. Performance wise, looks like this select acts a little more faster.
    – BernieSF
    Sep 8 '15 at 17:56
2

Please try something like:

select * from table
where RIGHT(CAST(value as DECIMAL(10,5)), value), 1) != 0
5
  • Glad to have been of help Sep 8 '15 at 16:36
  • @BernieSF & MegaTron It won't work if the value is 3.356009 Sep 8 '15 at 16:49
  • @MegaTron just one note: worked for my in this form: RIGHT(CONVERT(DECIMAL(10,5), MyColumn), 1) != 0
    – BernieSF
    Sep 8 '15 at 16:51
  • I get an error when running this answer's where clause Sep 8 '15 at 16:51
  • @AnupAgrawal its right. If the number ends with a '9', don't meet the condition and its left out from the results.
    – BernieSF
    Sep 8 '15 at 17:51
2
SELECT *
FROM table WHERE
(abs(val)*100000)%10 <> 0
1
  • Code only answers are bad - please elaborate what you did, how it works any why it solves this question - for ppl with less sql skills ;) Dec 13 '17 at 16:35
1

It's an older question but it checks out.

select val
from table
where ((val * 100) % 1) > 0

Change 100 to your precision.

0

You can multiply it with 10000 and subtract it from the original number replacing . with ''.

Fiddle

select * from tablename
where replace(numcolumn,'.','') - numcolumn * 10000 > 0
5
  • Doesn't work correctly. Returns rows with 3 decimals :(
    – BernieSF
    Sep 8 '15 at 16:28
  • please try the modified version Sep 8 '15 at 16:35
  • I tried your new version. Looks like works, but mysteriously returns fewer rows!
    – BernieSF
    Sep 8 '15 at 16:51
  • what do you mean by returns fewer rows? Sep 8 '15 at 16:55
  • @MegaTron select returns 2080 rows, your select 984 rows
    – BernieSF
    Sep 8 '15 at 16:56
0

Below is the Code that will check the precision for 4 decimal places:

  1. Replace MyNum, with column you are checking for precision
  2. Replace MyTbl, with the table you are using
  3. Replace 4, with whatever precision you are checking for

Sql:

SELECT  MyNum
      , LEN(CAST (MyNum AS CHAR))
      , -------1. length of decimal number, after conversion to CHAR
        CHARINDEX('.', CAST (MyNum AS CHAR))
      , ---2.length of numbers after the '.'
        LEN(CAST (MyNum AS CHAR)) - CHARINDEX('.', CAST (MyNum AS CHAR))  -----subtracting 1-2, to get the length of numbers after decimal point '.'
FROM    MyTbl
WHERE   LEN(CAST(MyNum AS CHAR)) - CHARINDEX('.', CAST(MyNum AS CHAR)) > 4; --checking if there are more than 4 numbers after the decimal point '.'
0
  1. Cast the number as text
  2. Split the text using '.' as separator
  3. Use the 2nd index and apply a length
  4. Filter
--i.e. with postgreSQL.
--1)
select data_numeric, length(arr[2]) as str_length
from (
  select data_numeric, regexp_split_to_array(data_numeric::text, '\.') as arr from TABLE
) temp;

--2)
with t1 as (
  select data_numeric, regexp_split_to_array(data_numeric::text, '\.') as arr from TABLE
), t2 as (
  select data_numeric, arr[2] as decimals, length(arr[2]) as length from t1
)
select * from t2;
0

Select numbers with more than 2 decimal places:

I had an example, where ((abs(val)*100) and CONVERT(INT,(abs(val)*100)) for value "2.32" in float type column returned two different values.

(abs(2.32)*100) = 232

CONVERT(INT,(abs(2.32)*100)) = 231

That caused wrong select query answers in case for comparing to 0. I suppose that MSSQL CONVERT() function round numbers in such way that for some float number cases, posted solution would not work.

Here is how I did it for more than 2 decimal places:

DECLARE @tbl TABLE (val float)
INSERT INTO @tbl SELECT 2.32
INSERT INTO @tbl SELECT 1234.54
INSERT INTO @tbl SELECT 1234.545
INSERT INTO @tbl SELECT 1234.5456
INSERT INTO @tbl SELECT 1234.54567

select * from @tbl where abs(val-round((val),2)) > 0.001

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