3

lets say I have this code here:

if(Something)
    condition |= Class1.Class2.SomeId;
else
    condition &= Class1.Class2.SomeId; 

The code is the same except for the &= and |=. Can I somehow create 2 operator "variables" and just use them in the code, like this:

condition "myoperator" Class1.Class2.SomeId;

Thanks :-)

2

No, you cannot do exactly what you are asking, but lambda expressions could be used to the same end.

Func<int, int, int> op;
if (Something)
{
  op = (x, y) => x | y;
}
else
{
  op = (x, y) => x & y;
}

condition = op(condition, Class1.Class2.SomeId);
2

No. You could make a function for each, though.

if (Something)
    idOr(ref condition, Class1.Class2.SomeId);
else
    idAnd(ref condition, Class1.Class2.SomeId);


function idOr(ref condition, whatever ID) {
    condition |= ID;
}
function idAnd(ref condition, whatever ID) {
    condition &= ID;
}
  • Yes, I was just wondering if thats possible somehow. So the operator keyword is used for overloading operators only? – grady Jul 14 '10 at 13:21
  • How about a lambda? – Mau Jul 14 '10 at 13:22
  • You can find more on msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8edha89s(v=VS.80).aspx?ppud=4. – Nebril Jul 14 '10 at 13:22
  • I dont get what u try to tell me :) – grady Jul 14 '10 at 13:23
  • If you could create new operators in code, it would make parsing the code significantly more complicated and potentially ambiguous. – bruceboughton Jul 14 '10 at 13:36
0

You can overload only operators of you own classes (not of Boolean)

if condition or SomeId is of your class, you can overload any operator that is on that msdn page (you cannot create entirely new operators).

  • What makes you think SomeId is a boolean ? I think it's an int (or any other integral type) – Thomas Levesque Jul 14 '10 at 13:39
0

You could dynamically generate a function to implement the operator you need :

public Func<T, T, T> GetOperator<T>(ExpressionType exprType)
{
    var p1 = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "p1");
    var p2 = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "p2");
    var expr = Expression.MakeBinary(exprType, p1, p2);
    var lambda = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, T, T>>(expr, p1, p2);
    return lambda.Compile();
}

...

var op = GetOperator<int>(Something ? ExpressionType.Or : ExpressionType.And);
condition = op(condition, Class1.Class2.SomeId);

But that's probably overkill... if you don't need a generic solution, just use Brian's solution.

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