1

My prompt is the following:

Write the definition of a function named alternator that receives no parameters and returns 1 the first time it is invoked, returns 0 the next time it is invoked, then 1, 0 and so on, alternating between 1/0 on successive invocations.

my attempt is:

int alternator(void) {

    static int x = 0;

    if(x == 0) {
        return 1;
    }

    else if (x % 2 == 0) {
        return 1;
        x++;
    }
    else {
        return 0;
        x++;
    }

}

Where did I go wrong?

  • Since x starts at 0, the first if fires every time, returning 1, and the rest of the code is never reached. – Lee Daniel Crocker Sep 8 '15 at 23:32
  • Even if you add the increment, you will eventually invoke undefined behaviour (crap, the question was closed just before I could complete my answer). – too honest for this site Sep 8 '15 at 23:59
4

I prefer xor for this since there is no upper limit on the number if times you can call alternator:

int alternator(void) {
    static int x = 0;  // set to 1 if you want 0 as first value...
    return x ^= 1;
}

Demo:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    for(int i=0; i<10; i++){
        printf("%d   %d\n", i, alternator());
    }

}

Prints:

0   1
1   0
2   1
3   0
4   1
5   0
6   1
7   0
8   1
9   0

As pointed out in the comments, you can also do:

int alternator(void) {
    static int x = 0;
    return x = !x;
}
  • 3
    Or if you don't fancy bit-twiddling, there's return x = !x; – Lee Daniel Crocker Sep 8 '15 at 23:34
  • "... since there is no upper limit on values" What do you mean? It only uses values 0 and 1 anyway. – too honest for this site Sep 8 '15 at 23:51
  • 2
    @Olaf I think dawg is referring to the x++ in the question (though never executed). – Weather Vane Sep 8 '15 at 23:56
  • The OP's solution has x++ which will eventually overflow the signed int. Gracefully maybe, depending on the platform, but one should do that only with forethought. Signed int overflow is, technically, undefined behavior. – dawg Sep 9 '15 at 0:04
1

You have x++ after returning, so the increment never occurs.

  • Hopefully there is a compiler warning in the compile output... – Eric J. Sep 8 '15 at 23:24
  • The increments will eventually invoke UB! Look at the type of x – too honest for this site Sep 9 '15 at 0:00
1

Like this:

int alternator(void) {
    static int x = 0;
    return x ^= 1;
}
  • Or if you don't fancy bit-twiddling, there's return x = (x + 1) & 1; – Weather Vane Sep 8 '15 at 23:43
  • Or if you still think that's bit-twiddling, there's return x = (x + 1) % 2; – Weather Vane Sep 8 '15 at 23:44
  • 1
    No bit-twiddling return x = "\1"[x]; – Blastfurnace Sep 8 '15 at 23:50
  • @Blastfurnace nice one. – Weather Vane Sep 8 '15 at 23:52
0

When a function returns nothing after the return will be executed.

Currently to the run-time your function looks like:

int alternator(void) {

    static int x = 0;

    if(x == 0) {
        return 1;
    }
}

because that is all that will ever be executed.

What you need to do is change the value of x each time the function is run and then return that value.

A simple if statement which detects whether the value of x is 1 or 0 would be sufficient.

It is also a good idea to usually only have one return statement at the end of the function and manipulate the return value within the function. This make the code more readable and easier to follow.

A reasonable attempt would look like:

int alternator(void) {

    static int x = 0;

    if(x == 0) 
    {
        x = 1;
    }
    else
    {
        x = 0;
    }
    return x;
}
  • You can replace all of that if/else code with x = 1 - x; or an XOR – Blastfurnace Sep 8 '15 at 23:27
  • @Blastfurnace I could but that would be less readable and reduce the granularity when debugging. For experienced programmers that would be fine but with newer programmers the more granular the program is the better, just so they can debug easier. – Serdalis Sep 8 '15 at 23:28
  • I think return x = !x; is pretty clear. – Lee Daniel Crocker Sep 8 '15 at 23:35
  • @LeeDanielCrocker untill they do return x == !x because they aren't used to having assignments on the same line as returns... But that's beside the point. I agree is clear and does look nice but I went for simple just to teach some good practices. – Serdalis Sep 8 '15 at 23:39
0

The code highlighted below is unreachable code:

else if (x % 2 == 0) { return 1; x++; } else { return 0; x++; }

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