93

Simple question here that I can't seem to find an answer for: Once a setTimeout is set, is there any way to see if it's still, well, set?

if (!Timer)
{
    Timer = setTimeout(DoThis,60000);
}

From what I can tell, when you clearTimeout, the variable remains at its last value. A console.log I just looked at shows Timer as being '12', no matter if the timeout has been set or cleared. Do I have to null out the variable as well, or use some other variable as a boolean saying, yes, I have set this timer? Surely there's a way to just check to see if the timeout is still running... right? I don't need to know how long is left, just if it's still running.

7 Answers 7

78

What I do is:

var timer = null;

if (timer != null) {
  window.clearTimeout(timer); 
  timer = null;
}
else {
  timer = window.setTimeout(yourFunction, 0);
}
5
  • 3
    Use setTimeout(yourFunction, 0), safer than setTimeout('yourFunction()', 0).
    – cprcrack
    Jan 19, 2014 at 0:34
  • 1
    @Epirocks Even in the asynchronous world, Javascript is still single threaded.
    – matpop
    Mar 21, 2016 at 11:11
  • 1
    I was just making the point that it would be nice if there was a way to ask the timer is it still running. I had a page full of asynchronous requests at the time and was finding this solution above a bit over simplified but cannot remember enough to go into details, wish I had.
    – Epirocks
    May 8, 2016 at 1:45
  • why do you clear and null? does clearTimeout not ensure it's not being taking up memory? Cheers. (Sorry I know this is from ages ago)
    – 1252748
    Oct 5, 2017 at 17:42
  • 3
    @1252748, the variable timer still keeps its value (a timer ID), even when window.clearTimeout is called. So it's necessary to reset it.
    – Benny Code
    Oct 5, 2017 at 18:30
59

There isn't anyway to interact with the timer except to start it or stop it. I typically null the timer variable in the timeout handler rather than use a flag to indicate that the timer isn't running. There's a nice description on W3Schools about how the timer works. In their example they use a flag variable.

The value you are seeing is a handle to the current timer, which is used when you clear (stop) it.

4
  • 9
    -1 patrick, that's not a worldly principle. sometimes they've got useful resources.
    – user993683
    Jul 21, 2012 at 11:39
  • 5
    OT: the problem is distinguishing those times from the others :) Without knowing about the topic, of course
    – superjos
    Aug 27, 2012 at 10:57
  • 1
    "I typically null the timer variable in the timeout " Jul 22, 2017 at 13:38
  • Perhaps you meant "I typically null the timer variable before starting a timer"?
    – Ian Y.
    Apr 23, 2023 at 16:14
29

There is no need to check for an existing timer, just execute clearTimeout before starting the timer.

var timer;
//..
var startTimer = function() {
  clearTimeout(timer);
  timer = setTimeout(DoThis, 6000);
}

This will clear any timer before starting a new instance.

3
  • Working fine, exactly as I looked for. Thanks.This answer deserves more upvotes. Sep 11, 2018 at 14:55
  • 10
    There is a need to check. Just because you haven't thought of a need doesn't mean there is none :)
    – vsync
    Mar 7, 2022 at 11:42
  • In my case, I have a setTimeout function that needs to be running at all times. The check is to make sure if the server crashes and restarts, the users who rely on the setTimeout function immediately regain the functionality after restart. clearTimeout does not help my reason to ask this question. Aug 13, 2023 at 1:57
5

Set another variable Timer_Started = true with your timer. And also change the variable to false when the timer function is called:

// set 'Timer_Started' when you setTimeout
var Timer_Started = true;
var Timer = setTimeout(DoThis,60000);

function DoThis(){

   // function DoThis actions 
   //note that timer is done.
   Timer_Started = false;

}

function Check_If_My_Timer_Is_Done(){

   if(Timer_Started){
      alert("The timer must still be running.");
   }else{
      alert("The timer is DONE.");
   }

}
3

I know this is a necroposting but i think still people are looking for this.

This is what i use: 3 variables:

  1. t for milliseconds since.. in Date Object for next target
  2. timerSys for the actual interval
  3. seconds threshold for milliseconds has been set

next i have a function timer with 1 variable the function checks if variable is truly, if so he check if timer is already running and if this is the case than fills the global vars , if not truly, falsely, clears the interval and set global var timerSys to false;

var t, timerSys, seconds;

function timer(s) {
  if (s && typeof s === "number") {
    if (typeof timerSys === "boolean" || typeof timerSys === "undefined") {
      timerSys = setInterval(function() {
        sys();
      }, s);
      t = new Date().setMilliseconds(s);
      seconds = s;
    }
  } else {
    clearInterval(timerSys);
    timerSys = false;
  }
  return ((!timerSys) ? "0" : t)
}

function sys() {
  t = new Date().setMilliseconds(seconds);

}

Example I

Now you can add a line to sys function:

function sys() {
  t = new Date().setMilliseconds(seconds);
  console.log("Next execution: " + new Date(t));
//this is also the place where you put functions & code needed to happen when interval is triggerd

}

And execute :

  timer(5000);

Every 5 seconds in console:

  //output:: Next execution: Sun May 08 2016 11:01:05 GMT+0200 (Romance (zomertijd))

Example II

function sys() {
  t = new Date().setMilliseconds(seconds);
  console.log("Next execution: " + seconds/1000 + " seconds");

}

$(function() {
  timer(5000);
});

Every 5 seconds in console:

      //output:: Next execution: 5 seconds

Example III

var t, timerSys, seconds;

function timer(s) {
  if (s && typeof s === "number") {
    if (typeof timerSys === "boolean" || typeof timerSys === "undefined") {
      timerSys = setInterval(function() {
        sys();
      }, s);
      t = new Date().setMilliseconds(s);
      seconds = s;
    }
  } else {
    clearInterval(timerSys);
    timerSys = false;
  }
  return ((!timerSys) ? "0" : t)
}

function sys() {
  t = new Date().setMilliseconds(seconds);
  console.log("Next execution: " + seconds / 1000 + " seconds");

}

$(function() {
  timer(5000);

  $("button").on("click", function() {
    $("span").text(t - new Date());
  })
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<button>Freebeer</button>
<span></span>

Note this way you can go below 0

3

I usually nullify the timer:

var alarm = setTimeout(wakeUpOneHourLater, 3600000);
function wakeUpOneHourLater() {
    alarm = null;    //stop alarm after sleeping for exactly one hour
}
//...
if (!alarm) {
    console.log('Oops, waked up too early...Zzz...');
}
else {
    console.log('Slept for at least one hour!');
}
0

I created a timer service as below exported from timer.ts -

    import { setIntoStorage } from "./storage";

    type TimeoutInfo = {
      key: string;
      timeOutDate: string;
      purpose?: string;
    };

    const kActiveTimersKey = "app-active-timers";

    class Timers {
      private static instance: Timers;
      private static activeTimers: TimeoutInfo[] = [];

      constructor() {
        if (Timers.instance) {
          return Timers.instance;
        }

        Timers.instance = this;
      }

      async addTimeoutEntry(timeoutInfo: TimeoutInfo): Promise<void> {
        this.removeTimeoutEntry(timeoutInfo.key);
        Timers.activeTimers.push(timeoutInfo);
        await setIntoStorage(kActiveTimersKey, Timers.activeTimers);
      }

      async removeTimeoutEntry(key: string): Promise<void> {
        Timers.activeTimers = Timers.activeTimers.filter((v) => v.key !== key);
        await setIntoStorage(kActiveTimersKey, Timers.activeTimers);
      }
    }

    export const TimerService = new Timers();

I use this whilst creating or clearing a timeout -


    if (timer) {
      clearTimeout(timer);
      timer = null;
      TimerService.removeTimeoutEntry("AUTO_LOGOUT_TIMER");
    }


    timer = setTimeout(() => {
      dispatch(signUserOut());
    }, timeoutTime);

    const now = new Date();

    TimerService.addTimeoutEntry({
      key: "AUTO_LOGOUT_TIMER",
      timeOutDate: new Date(now.getTime() + timeoutTime).toLocaleString(),
      purpose: "Auto logout user when the JWT token expires",
    });

A bit of overhead to add/remove to timer service but it shows up in the local storage for a quick check. I have very few use for this service since I don't have much timeouts set in my app.

Showed like this in the indexedDb - enter image description here

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