6

If I have a YEAR and a WEEK number, what's a clean way to construct a DATE from this? I'd prefer it if the day of the week could be a Monday.

  • Change tag to MsSql – Amir Pelled Sep 9 '15 at 8:13
  • Any database should have a table with a running number from 0 to very high. Such a table is very usefull, wherevere you try to fill gaps. In additional columns you could write running dates, their weekday, calendar week and other information you might need. With such a table your question is a simple select... – Shnugo Sep 9 '15 at 8:16
5

Use DATEADD

Rextester Demo

DECLARE @y INT = 2015, 
        @w INT = 37;

SELECT 
  [StartOfWeek] = DATEADD(wk,DATEDIFF(wk,7,CAST(@y AS NVARCHAR(100))) + (@w-1),7);
2

Attention Read comments about DATEFIRST. This is depending on your culture...

According to my comment to your question this is a way to introduce such a running numbers table starting with 1900-01-01 up to somewhere in the year 2173.

CREATE TABLE dbo.RunningNumbers(Number INT NOT NULL
                               ,CalendarDate DATE NOT NULL
                               ,CalendarYear INT NOT NULL
                               ,CalendarMonth INT NOT NULL
                               ,CalendarDay INT NOT NULL
                               ,CalendarWeek INT NOT NULL
                               ,CalendarYearDay INT NOT NULL
                               ,CalendarWeekDay INT NOT NULL);

DECLARE @CountEntries INT = 100000;
DECLARE @StartNumber INT = 0;


WITH E1(N) AS(SELECT 1 FROM(VALUES (1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1))t(N)), --10 ^ 1
    E2(N) AS(SELECT 1 FROM E1 a CROSS JOIN E1 b), -- 10 ^ 2 = 100 rows
    E4(N) AS(SELECT 1 FROM E2 a CROSS JOIN E2 b), -- 10 ^ 4 = 10,000 rows
    E8(N) AS(SELECT 1 FROM E4 a CROSS JOIN E4 b), -- 10 ^ 8 = 10,000,000 rows
    CteTally AS
    (
        SELECT TOP(ISNULL(@CountEntries,1000000)) ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY(SELECT NULL)) -1 + ISNULL(@StartNumber,0) As Nmbr
        FROM E8
    )
INSERT INTO dbo.RunningNumbers
SELECT CteTally.Nmbr,CalendarDate.d,CalendarExt.*
FROM CteTally
CROSS APPLY
(
    SELECT DATEADD(DAY,CteTally.Nmbr,{ts'1900-01-01 00:00:00'})
) AS CalendarDate(d)
CROSS APPLY
(
    SELECT YEAR(CalendarDate.d) AS CalendarYear
          ,MONTH(CalendarDate.d) AS CalendarMonth
          ,DAY(CalendarDate.d) AS CalendarDay
          ,DATEPART(WEEK,CalendarDate.d) AS CalendarWeek
          ,DATEPART(DAYOFYEAR,CalendarDate.d) AS CalendarYearDay
          ,DATEPART(WEEKDAY,CalendarDate.d) AS CalendarWeekDay
) AS CalendarExt;

This will bring you the current Monday:

SELECT * FROM dbo.RunningNumbers
WHERE CalendarYear = 2015
  AND CalendarWeek = 37
  AND CalendarWeekDay=1

part of the result

+--------+--------------+--------------+---------------+-------------+--------------+-----------------+-----------------+
| Number | CalendarDate | CalendarYear | CalendarMonth | CalendarDay | CalendarWeek | CalendarYearDay | CalendarWeekDay |
....
+--------+--------------+--------------+---------------+-------------+--------------+-----------------+-----------------+
| 43736  | 2019-09-30   | 2019         | 9             | 30          | 40           | 273             | 1               |
+--------+--------------+--------------+---------------+-------------+--------------+-----------------+-----------------+
| 43737  | 2019-10-01   | 2019         | 10            | 1           | 40           | 274             | 2               |
+--------+--------------+--------------+---------------+-------------+--------------+-----------------+-----------------+
| 43738  | 2019-10-02   | 2019         | 10            | 2           | 40           | 275             | 3               |
+--------+--------------+--------------+---------------+-------------+--------------+-----------------+-----------------+
....

Hint 1: One should place indexes!

Hint 2: You can add columns to reflect different cultures, holidays, whatever you might need...

  • If you go this way, you should add indexes to all table columns for faster search results... – Shnugo Sep 9 '15 at 8:41
  • Your CalendarWeekDay=1 is Sunday. – Lukasz Szozda Sep 9 '15 at 8:45
  • Yes, true, depending on the system's culture. Easy to correct with SET DATEFIRST or via @@DATEFIRST or a simple +1 in the INSERT INTO part... Thx for pointing this out! – Shnugo Sep 9 '15 at 8:48
  • One more question why you use this type of literal {ts'1900-01-01 00:00:00'}? – Lukasz Szozda Sep 9 '15 at 9:02
  • I had to deal with scripts which had to run on international servers. We ran into silly errors with differing date conversions depending on the system's culture. Since then I've been using this format, as it works on any system. Which format would you use? – Shnugo Sep 9 '15 at 9:06
0

I solved it using this query:

dateadd(week, the_week_column-1, to_date(cast(the_year_column as string), 'YYYY'))

where

  • to_date(cast(the_year_column as string), 'YYYY') returns the starting date of the year, e.g. 2018-01-01
  • the_week_column - 1 specifies how many weeks should be added to the starting date.

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