5

Below query taking around 15 seconds to return data despite of having an index, and the id as primary key.

select id from my_table order by insert_date offset 0 limit 1

The explain analyze is as below

"Limit  (cost=1766417.72..1766417.72 rows=1 width=12) (actual time=32479.440..32479.441 rows=1 loops=1)"
"  ->  Sort  (cost=1766417.72..1797117.34 rows=12279848 width=12) (actual time=32479.437..32479.437 rows=1 loops=1)"
"        Sort Key: insert_date"
"        Sort Method: top-N heapsort  Memory: 25kB"
"        ->  Seq Scan on my_table  (cost=0.00..1705018.48 rows=12279848 width=12) (actual time=0.006..21338.401 rows=12108916 loops=1)"
"Total runtime: 32479.476 ms"

My table has few other columns. But the type for the insert_date is

insert_date timestamp without time zone NOT NULL DEFAULT now(),

I have an index on that particular date column which is

CREATE INDEX my_table_insert_date_indx
  ON my_table
  USING btree
  (insert_date)
TABLESPACE somexyz_idx_ts;

Few values from postgresql.conf file:

shared_buffers = more than 1GB    ## just for an example
temp_buffers = more than 1GB
work_mem = more than 1GB
maintenance_work_mem = more than 1GB
dynamic_shared_memory_type = posix
default_statistics_target = 10000
autovacuum = on
random_page_cost = 2.0
cpu_index_tuple_cost = 0.0005

I am using postgres 9.3 right now.

UPDATE::

I just ran the below query a while ago:

select insert_date, count(*) from my_table group by insert_date

and the top few from the result is:

"2015-04-02 00:00:00";3718104
"2015-04-03 00:00:00";6410253
"2015-04-04 00:00:00";538247
"2015-04-05 00:00:00";1228877
"2015-04-06 00:00:00";131248

I have around 12 million records on that table. And the above count is nearly close to that total.

Not sure, but could it be a problem that the index has been created on a column that is having tons of duplicate values? If it is true, then do we have any way around?

4
  • Maybe a better place to ask : dba.stackexchange.com – Luc M Sep 9 '15 at 12:30
  • There was a similar question recently on SO, and I think the conclusion might have been that 9.4 was better at ordering by an indexed column to avoid a sort. Might like to search for that question. – David Aldridge Sep 9 '15 at 12:40
  • Please test same query with set enable_seqscan = off; and show explain analyze output. How big is your index and table? \di+ my_table_insert_date_indx, \dt+ my_table commands in psql will show sizes – alexius Sep 10 '15 at 3:41
  • @alexius Disabling the seqscan doesn't make any change in analyze result. However, in real environment I can not disable seqscan only for improving this particular query. My table size is 23 GB and the index size is 293 MB – Sabuj Hassan Sep 23 '15 at 7:35
3

Your query runs about 160000 times faster on my machine using both PostgreSQL 9.3 and 9.4. My machine is nothing special.

-- From PostgreSQL 9.4; 9.3 is similar.
show shared_buffers; -- 128MB
show temp_buffers; -- 8MB
show work_mem; -- 4MB
show maintenance_work_mem; -- 64MB
show dynamic_shared_memory_type; -- posix
show default_statistics_target; -- 100
show autovacuum; -- on
show random_page_cost; -- 4
show cpu_index_tuple_cost; -- 0.005

Preparation

Let's build a table. (You should have done this in your question.)

create table my_table (
  id serial primary key,
  insert_date timestamp not null
);

-- Round numbers of rows.
insert into my_table(insert_date)
select timestamp '2015-04-02 00:00:00'
from generate_series(1, 3000000) n;

insert into my_table(insert_date)
select timestamp '2015-04-03 00:00:00'
from generate_series(1, 6000000) n;

insert into my_table(insert_date)
select timestamp '2015-04-04 00:00:00'
from generate_series(1, 500000) n;

insert into my_table(insert_date)
select timestamp '2015-04-05 00:00:00'
from generate_series(1, 1200000) n;

insert into my_table(insert_date)
select timestamp '2015-04-06 00:00:00'
from generate_series(1, 131000) n;

Create an index, and update statistics.

create index on my_table (insert_date);
analyze my_table;

PostgreSQL 9.4

Now, what kind of execution plan do we get from your first query?

explain analyze 
select id from my_table order by insert_date offset 0 limit 1;
"Limit  (cost=0.43..0.48 rows=1 width=12) (actual time=0.014..0.014 rows=1 loops=1)"
"  ->  Index Scan using my_table_insert_date_idx on my_table  (cost=0.43..540656.27 rows=11200977 width=12) (actual time=0.012..0.012 rows=1 loops=1)"
"Planning time: 0.195 ms"
"Execution time: 0.032 ms"

PostgreSQL 9.3

explain analyze 
select id from my_table order by insert_date offset 0 limit 1;
"Limit  (cost=0.43..0.47 rows=1 width=12) (actual time=0.058..0.059 rows=1 loops=1)"
"  ->  Index Scan using my_table_insert_date_idx on my_table  (cost=0.43..339814.36 rows=10830995 width=12) (actual time=0.057..0.057 rows=1 loops=1)"
"Total runtime: 0.098 ms"

Your query

select id from my_table order by insert_date offset 0 limit 1;

is indeterminate. There are 3 million rows that have the lowest insert_date (the date that will appear first, according to the ORDER BY clause). You pick one of those 3 million. PostgreSQL doesn't guarantee you'll get the same id every time.

If you don't care which of the 3 million ids it returns, you can express the query differently. But I don't think expressing it differently will give you 160k times speedup.

Some of the settings you included can be changed for a particular query. So you can do something like this.

-- Don't commit or rollback . . . 
begin transaction;
set local work_mem = '8 MB';

explain analyze 
select id from my_table order by insert_date offset 0 limit 1;
-- Displays the result. 

Commit or rollback manually.

commit;

Your work_mem setting returns to the value set on server start.

show work_mem; -- 4MB

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.