2

I am encountering a conceptual hurdle with how Entity Framework is inferring entity relationships. So while I have solved my problem, it doesn't make sense to me why it works.

I have the following entities, here in simplified form, from the Geometry Class Library.

Line class, with primary/foreign key properties hidden for brevity and focus on the question:

public class Line
{
    public virtual Point BasePoint
    {
        get { return _basePoint; }
        set { _basePoint = value; }
    }
    private Point _basePoint;

    public virtual Direction Direction
    {
        get { return _direction; }
        set { _direction = value; }
    }
    private Direction _direction;
}

Vector class, a child of Line, also with primary/foreign key properties hidden:

public class Vector : Line
{
    public virtual Distance Magnitude
    {
        get { return _magnitude; }
        set { _magnitude = value; }
    }
    private Distance _magnitude;

    public virtual Point EndPoint
    {
        get { return new Point(XComponent, YComponent, ZComponent) + BasePoint; }
    }
}

LineSegment class, a child of Vector, also with primary/foreign key properties hidden:

public partial class LineSegment : Vector
{
    public virtual Distance Length
    {
        get { return base.Magnitude; }
        set { base.Magnitude = value; }
    }

    public List<Point> EndPoints
    {
        get { return new List<Point>() { BasePoint, EndPoint }; }
    }
}

It is my understanding that Entity Framework ignores getter-only properties, only mapping properties with both a getter and a setter. However, to avoid getting an error of

Unable to determine a valid ordering for dependent operations. Dependencies may exist due to foreign key constraints, model requirements, or store-generated values.

on insert of a LineSegment into the database (Line and Vector work fine), I have to have the following in my model creation:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    // ...

    // Set up Line model
    modelBuilder.Entity<Line>()
        .HasKey(line => line.DatabaseId);
    modelBuilder.Entity<Line>()
        .HasRequired(line => line.BasePoint)
        .WithMany()
        .HasForeignKey(line => line.BasePoint_DatabaseId); // Identify foreign key field
    modelBuilder.Entity<Line>()
        .HasRequired(line => line.Direction)
        .WithMany()
        .HasForeignKey(line => line.Direction_DatabaseId); // Identify foreign key field

   modelBuilder.Entity<Vector>()
        .HasRequired(vector => vector.Magnitude)
        .WithMany()
        .HasForeignKey(vector => vector.Magnitude_DatabaseId); // Identify foreign key field

    modelBuilder.Entity<LineSegment>()
       .Ignore(lineSegment => lineSegment.Length);
    modelBuilder.Entity<LineSegment>() // Why this? EndPoints is a getter only property
       .Ignore(lineSegment => lineSegment.EndPoints);
}

Most of that makes sense to me, but for Entity Framework to understand my model and not produce the error quoted above, why must I include that last statement?

1

It seems that Entity Framework automatically ignores getter-only properties of the type string, primitive types, and enumeration types. In all other cases you have to ignore them explicitly, using .Ignore() method or [NotMapped] annotation.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks! That seems to be the case, but can you provide some documentation backing that and perhaps explaining the reason for that? – Scotty H Sep 10 '15 at 18:51
  • I am still searching for it... but I didn't find anything so far – Fabio Luz Sep 10 '15 at 19:02
  • 1
    This is because collections can merely be populated, nor set, at runtime,. It may be necessary to set them if they aren't initialized (e.g. in the constructor), but that's something EF only knows at runtime, not when the type is configured. So it errs on the side of caution and requires you to explicitly ignore it. – Gert Arnold Sep 11 '15 at 21:33

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