8

So i am trying to get total size of a directory using golang, so far i have this

var dirSize int64 = 0

func readSize(path string, file os.FileInfo, err error) error {
    if !file.IsDir() {
        dirSize += file.Size()
    }
    return nil
} 

func DirSizeMB(path string) float64 {
    dirSize = 0
    filepath.Walk(path, readSize)
    sizeMB := float64(dirSize) / 1024.0 / 1024.0
    sizeMB = Round(sizeMB, .5, 2)
    return sizeMB
}

So the question is whether the dirSize global variable is going to cause problems and if it does, how do i move it to scope of DirSizeMB function?

23

Using a global like that at best is bad practice. It's also a race if DirSizeMB is called concurrently.

The simple solution is to use a closure, e.g.:

func DirSize(path string) (int64, error) {
    var size int64
    err := filepath.Walk(path, func(_ string, info os.FileInfo, err error) error {
        if err != nil {
            return err
        }
        if !info.IsDir() {
            size += info.Size()
        }
        return err
    })
    return size, err
}

Playground

You could assign the closure to a variable if you think that looks better.

  • 1
    u might need if err != nil || file == nil { return nil // Ignore errors } as well? – Andrew Arrow Dec 15 '15 at 2:08
0

If you want to use a variable, you can do this:

func DirSizeMB(path string) float64 {
    var dirSize int64 = 0

    readSize := func(path string, file os.FileInfo, err error) error {
        if !file.IsDir() {
            dirSize += file.Size()
        }

        return nil
    }

    filepath.Walk(path, readSize)    

    sizeMB := float64(dirSize) / 1024.0 / 1024.0

    return sizeMB
}
-3

One thing you could do would be to define a channel inside of DirSizeMB, and define readSize inside of that function so it gets the channel as a closure. Then send all of the sizes out the channel and sum them as you receive them.

func DirSizeMB(path string) float64 {
    sizes := make(chan int64)
    readSize := func(path string, file os.FileInfo, err error) error {
        if err != nil || file == nil {
            return nil // Ignore errors
        }
        if !file.IsDir() {
            sizes <- file.Size()
        }
        return nil
    }

    go func() {
        filepath.Walk(path, readSize)
        close(sizes)
    }()

    size := int64(0)
    for s := range sizes {
        size += s
    }

    sizeMB := float64(size) / 1024.0 / 1024.0

    sizeMB = Round(sizeMB, 0.5, 2)

    return sizeMB
}

http://play.golang.org/p/zzKZu0cm9n

Why use a channel?

Unless you've read the underlying code, you don't actually know how filepath.Walk invokes your readSize function. While it probably calls it sequentially over all of the files on the given path, the implementation could theoretically invoke several of these calls simultaneously on separate goroutines (the docs would probably mention this if it did). In any case, in a language designed for concurrency, it's good practice to make sure that your code is safe.

The answer that @DaveC gives shows how to do this by using a closure over a local variable solves the problem of having a global variable, so multiple simultaneous calls to DirSize would be safe. The Docs for Walk explicitly state that the walk function runs over files in a deterministic order, so his solution is sufficient for this problem, but I'll leave this as an example of how to make it safe to run the inner function concurrently.

  • 1
    A variation on this would be if you wanted to do something expensive or time consuming with each but using N parallel workers. You'd start N goroutines reading from a channel and the function passed to walk would just feed the file info into one of the works via the single channel. – Dave C Sep 9 '15 at 15:25

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