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I want to find a specific sequence of Bytes in a binary file using PHP. I represented this sequence in hexadecimal, to avoid typing too many 0s and 1s. The sequence to find is 0x4749524f. This is the working solution i came up for now:

$mysequence = "4749524f";
$f = fopen($filename, "r") or die("Unable to open file!");
while(!feof($f)) {
    $seq = fread($f, 4);
    if(bin2hex($seq) == $mysequence) {
        echo "found!";
        break;
    }
    else if(!feof($f)) fseek($f, -3, SEEK_CUR);
}

What the algorithm does is simple:

  1. Read 4 Bytes
  2. Check if they are equals to the sequence
  3. If they are equals -> found! Stop the execution.
  4. If they are not equals and i am not at the end of the file, go back 3 Bytes into the file and repeat step 1.

Why do I go back 3 Bytes? Because if this is the content of the file:

0000 4749 524f 0000 01b0 0013

If i don't go back 3 Bytes, I will read 0000 4749 on the first iteration, 524f 0000 on the second, 01b0 0013 on the third and as you can see i missed the sequence.

Problem: It's slow like hell...The application will have to work with files up to 50MB big, so it will take forever to find this sequence.

Is there an optimized function in PHP that would do the job? Is there a faster (not dumb like mine) way to do this?

  • 1
    Read in a long set of bytes, something like maybe 1M (or more). Then search that in memory. When reading the next 1Mbytes, be sure to also check if the last 3 of the first set were the start of the needle. – Jonathan M Sep 9 '15 at 18:47
  • Ok, i'm gonna try it! Thanks. BTW i thought that the file was cached in memry during read...do you mean that every time i run the function fread the file is read directly from the hard disk? – Alberto Fontana Sep 9 '15 at 18:50
  • @AlbertoFontana It's just a modification of the same approach, only read in larger chunks (I'd argue 4-8k) and then a "find in chunk" (vs "chunk exact match"). To easily handle split chunks a simple way is to seek back as well so chunks are actually overlapped by a few bytes (this close seek is plenty fine when done relatively infrequently). It is the reduced number of system calls is what will the biggest performance difference. Also a little bit more work can be reduced by converting $mysequence to the byte sequence, instead of always converting the read data. – user2864740 Sep 9 '15 at 18:51
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    Caching is done at the mercy of the OS. Do your own caching with large reads. – Jonathan M Sep 9 '15 at 18:51
  • 1
    After reading in the next set of bytes, prepend the last 3 bytes of the previous set and start searching. – Jonathan M Sep 9 '15 at 18:55
1

Doing reads from disk always takes a long time. You can't count on disk caching. That's an OS thing. Instead, do your own "caching", as it were. Read in a long set of bytes, something like maybe 1M (or more). This reduces disk reads. Then search that in memory. When reading the next 1Mbytes, be sure to prepend to it the last 3 bytes of the previous set. Search each set until found. The actual size of your read will need to be a balance between RAM usage and disk reads.

| improve this answer | |
3

First of all your $mysequence is not changing while search, so you can call hex2bin($mysequence) once and compare it with $seq directly.

As for doing it really faster, you can try read and search for string in large buffers. Larger buffer => faster search, but more memory needed. Fast code draft, how this should look like:

$mysequence = "4749524f";
$searchBytes = hex2bin($mysequence);
$crossing = 1 - length($searchBytes); // - (length - 1); see below
$buf = ''; $buflen = 10000;
$f = fopen($filename, "r") or die("Unable to open file!");
while(!feof($f)) 
{
    $seq .= fread($f, $buflen);
    if(strpos($seq, $searchBytes) === false) // strict comparation here. zero can be returned!
    {
        // keep last n-1 bytes, because they can be beginning of required sequence
        $seq = substr($seq, $crossing);
    }
    else
    {
        echo "found!";
        break;
    }
}
unset($seq); // no need to keep this in memory any more
| improve this answer | |
  • I didn't understand when you said:" your $seq is not changing while search, so you can call bin2hex() once.". Of course $seq changes, because i read a new sequence in every loop...am i wrong? – Alberto Fontana Sep 10 '15 at 9:13
  • My fault. You can call hex2bin($mysequence) and compare with $seq. Without calling bin2hex every time. – red_led Sep 10 '15 at 9:17

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