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In previous golang applications I've made that use the DefaultServeMux, if I had a route like this "/users/" route that was handled by func user(name string), for example, and I sent a request to /users/jim, the request would still be handled by the "/users/" route. In the current application I'm making, I'm not using DefaultServeMux but merely passing a handler that implements ServeHTTP and then switching on the request url. However, now, if I send a request to a route that doesn't exactly match, the handler function doesn't get called. For example, if I send a post request to "/api/jim", I get a 404 error even though "/api" is handled.

I want to keep my application the way it is (with a reference to the DB in the handler) but also be able to handle routes that don't match exactly.

Question: Assuming I could create a new ServeMux to handle routes that don't exactly match, but how can I compose that with my type Handler Struct that has the reference to the database connection?

type Handler struct{
  DB *DB
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println("Hello, playground")


    db, err := sql.Open("postgres", dbinfo)
    defer db.Close()

    h := &Handler{
      DB: db,
    }

    log.Fatal(http.ListenAndServe(":8888", h))
}

func (h *Handler)ServeHTTP(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request){

    switch r.URL.Path{
        case "/":
        h.serveRoot(w, r)
        case "/api/":
        h.apiRouter(w, r)
    }
}

func (h *Handler)serveRoot(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request){
        h.DB.DoSomethingWithDB()
}

func (h *Handler)apiRouter(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request){

       switch r.URL.Path{

           case "/":
               h.serveRoot(w, r)
           case "/api/":
               h.apiRouter(w, r)

       }
}

Update For reasons that aren't relevant to the question, I can't use DefaultServeMux

  • 2
    I don't see what functionality you want that isn't provided by http.ServeMux. ServeMux is just a type of handler that can dispatch to other handlers based on the request. There's also a plethora of http router packages for Go with various features if ServeMux doesn't suit your needs. – JimB Sep 9 '15 at 18:50
  • For reasons that aren't relevant to the question, I can't use DefaultServeMux (I'll update the OP to mention that), so I have to either create a new ServeMux or do what I did in the OP. Either way, I would like to figure out how to keep a reference to the database with the handler – BrainLikeADullPencil Sep 9 '15 at 18:58
  • So don't use DefaultServeMux, and create a new instance of ServeMux. – JimB Sep 9 '15 at 18:59
  • @JimB I guess my question isn't clear. that's what I want to do, but I don't know how to integrate it with the handler that has the reference to the database. that's the whole point of the question. Sorry if it wasn't clear. – BrainLikeADullPencil Sep 9 '15 at 19:04
  • 1
    You seem to be asking the exact same question you asked here: stackoverflow.com/questions/32330744/… – JimB Sep 9 '15 at 19:21
3

Your custom handler struct, a ServeMux, a HandlerFunc, and 3rd party routers are all of type http.Handler. You can compose and layer them as needed.

Since a ServeMux is a Handler, you can assign it to a path just like any other handler, and register separate paths for various handlers. Here's an example of using multiple http.ServeMux (which could be defined in separate packages if you choose). This has 3 separate handlers (defined via a HandlerFunc), routed over 2 ServeMux.

Here we have a ServeMux create in a package "router"

var Sub = http.NewServeMux()

func subHandler(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
    fmt.Println("handled / in /sub")
    w.Write([]byte("/sub/\n"))
}    

func init() {
    Sub.HandleFunc("/", subHandler)
}

Now we can import the ServeMux from "router", and use it in our top level Handler, along with some others:

import "router"

func rootHandler(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
    fmt.Println("handled /")
    w.Write([]byte("/\n"))
}

func topHandler(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
    fmt.Println("handled /top")
    w.Write([]byte("/top/\n"))
}
func main() {

    mux := http.NewServeMux()
    mux.HandleFunc("/", rootHandler)
    mux.HandleFunc("/top/", topHandler)

    // now insert the Sub routes under "/top/sub/"
    mux.Handle("/top/sub/", http.StripPrefix("/top", router.Sub))

    server := &http.Server{Addr: ":9999", Handler: mux}
    log.Fatal(server.ListenAndServe())
}

How you choose to register these is up to you, either via importing and routing them like this in the main package, or via some other registration pattern (like e.g the database/sql drivers).

There's also no shortage of 3rd party routing packages to make this easier, higher performance, or provide more advanced methods of pattern matching.

  • I appreciate your time and effort but the point of the question was how to use the NewServeMux outside of the main function of package main (say, for example, by making it part of a type Handler struct from one of th eother packages) and those are the only examples you provided. I'll give you an upvote but I can't accept the answer because it doesn't respond to the question. – BrainLikeADullPencil Sep 9 '15 at 21:14
  • 1
    @BrainLikeADullPencil: I'm really failing to see what you're missing. This shows exactly that; there's no reason you can't define the sub ServeMux in a separate package and choose how to rout it in main, or as I mentioned, you could provide a registration pattern for sub's package to register routes itself ( for example, net/http/pprof self-registers routes in the DefaultServeMux) – JimB Sep 9 '15 at 21:20
  • @BrainLikeADullPencil: I changed the example to do the exact same thing, except import the ServeMux from another package. – JimB Sep 9 '15 at 21:36

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