8

I'm using Term::ReadKey in ReadMode('cbreak') to read a single character and perform an action based on the input. This works fine for all other keys except the arrow keys. When the arrow keys are pressed, the action is performed 3 times and I understand this is because the arrow keys translate to '^[[A', etc...

How do I translate the arrow keys into some arbitrary single value that the ReadKey can interpret?

I tried the following code but it doesn't work:

use Term::ReadKey;

ReadMode('cbreak');

my $keystroke = '';

while ($keystroke ne 'h') {

    print "Enter key: "; 

    #Read user keystroke 
    $keystroke = ReadKey(0);

    chomp($keystroke);


    if(ord($keystroke) == 27) {
         $keystroke = ('0');
    }
}

Here's my code based on the suggestion:

use Term::RawInput;
use strict;
use warnings;

my $keystroke = '';
my $special = ''; 

while(lc($keystroke) ne 'i' && lc($keystroke) ne 't'){

    my $promptp = "Enter key: ";

    ($keystroke,$special) = rawInput($promptp, 1);

    if ($keystroke ne '') {
        print "You hit the normal '$keystroke' key\n";
    } else {
        print "You hit the special '$special' key\n";
    }

    chomp($keystroke);

    $keystroke = lc($keystroke);
}

if($keystroke eq 'i') {
    #Do something
}

if($keystroke eq 't') {
    #Do something
}

Now, no matter what I press, I can't exit this loop

Here's the output:

Enter key: 
Enter key:
Enter key: You hit the normal 't' key

#Proceeds to function
1
  • What OS are you using?
    – Matt Jacob
    Sep 9, 2015 at 22:29

4 Answers 4

3

Here's my working solution...

use Term::ReadKey;

ReadMode('cbreak');

{
    #Temporarily turn off warnings so no messages appear for uninitialized $keystroke
    #that for some reason appears for the if statement
    no warnings;

    my $keystroke = '';

    while ($keystroke ne 'h') {

        print "\nEnter key: ";

        #Read user keystroke 
        $keystroke = ReadKey(0);

        #The first character for the arrow keys (ex. '^[[A') evaluates to 27 so I check for 
        #that
        if(ord($keystroke) == 27) {
            #Flush the rest of the characters from input buffer
            #This produces an 'Use of uninitialized value...' error
            #for the other two characters, hence 'no warnings' at the beginning.
            #This will ignore the other 2 characters and only cause a single iteration
            while( defined ReadKey(-1) ) {}
        }
    ReadMode 0;
    }
}
5
  • Thank you! I've been searching all morning for a way to handle these special characters!
    – tjwrona
    Sep 14, 2015 at 17:13
  • Not sure why you use the $mode variable though. while (defined ReadKey(-1)) {} works fine for me.
    – tjwrona
    Sep 14, 2015 at 17:16
  • Good catch... The $mode variable served no useful meaning to this solution, it was a variable I needed for my program... I've updated the answer based on your input... Thanks @tjwrona1992 Sep 14, 2015 at 21:38
  • Good to start, however I see some details: You are missing a ReadMode 0 at the end of the code, so it will reset the mode. All arrow keys will return "27" as is the first in sequence. For example, UP is: 27,91,65 and DOWN is: 27,91,66, so for the code both are "27" (the rest discarded). The same happens with the example at the documentation, so I guess is something with the library.
    – lepe
    Jul 26, 2016 at 4:03
  • 1
    FYI, added the ReadMode 0 as suggested by @lepe, which helps. This still doesn't work great but with that change it is a start at least
    – JohnE
    Apr 1, 2021 at 15:01
2

Term::RawInput doesn't cover everything, but it's a pretty good start for this task:

use Term::RawInput;
my ($keystroke,$special) = rawInput("", 1);
if ($keystroke ne '') {
    print "You hit the normal '$keystroke' key\n";
} else {
    print "You hit the special '$special' key\n";
}
7
  • This does accurately detect both the normal keys and special keys. However, now the same issue is occurring when I type the normal keys. For example, if I hit 't', my function executes 3 times, yet, if I hit the up arrow, my function correctly executes once. So I'm not sure how I'd use this in conjunction with ReadKeys to get a working solution. Sep 10, 2015 at 0:43
  • @user3821320 what function? There isn't any in the code in your question.
    – hobbs
    Sep 10, 2015 at 0:58
  • Sorry, I mean the prompt... the "Enter Key" prompt will display multiple times, even though I only hit the key once @hobbs Sep 10, 2015 at 1:03
  • I've updated my question with the code from this suggestion... When I hit a regular key at the "Enter key: " prompt, the iteration will go through 3 times and on the last iteration it will display "You hit the normal ... key" @mob Sep 10, 2015 at 1:35
  • use strict; use warnings;. The $keystroke in the while statement is different from the my ($keystroke) inside the loop.
    – mob
    Sep 10, 2015 at 2:29
2

If you're wanting to read high-level semantic ideas of "keypresses", rather than lower-level ideas of "bytes from the terminal" you'll need something that can parse and collect up those multi-byte sequences for you.

For this sort of task, I wrote Term::TermKey:

use Term::TermKey;

my $tk = Term::TermKey->new( \*STDIN );

print "Press any key\n";

$tk->waitkey( my $key );

print "You pressed: " . $tk->format_key( $key, 0 );
2
  • I get an error when I try to install the module... "cpan Term::TermKey"... the first is "---- Unsatisfied dependencies detected during ---- ---- PEVANS/Term-TermKey-0.16.tar.gz ----" Sep 10, 2015 at 14:21
  • 1
    @user3821320 stackoverflow isn't for support issues. Maybe try raising an RT ticket? rt.cpan.org/Dist/… or email me - address is all over CPAN.
    – LeoNerd
    Sep 10, 2015 at 16:28
1

Based on mob answer, using Term::RawInput, I did this script to emulate a more complex input interaction. The most important difference is the use of 'rawInput': mob suggested: rawInput("",1), I find out that actually using rawInput("> ") (without the second parameter) makes things easier to work with, and having a prompt ">" is more useful.

This code accepts commands and special keys. Also, it displays nicely to be used as an interactive shell for your system.

DELETE key will remove all chars and BACKSPACE a single character. ESC will exit the shell. You can add more keys to include arrows or anything else to perform special functions. This code will print-out any special key pressed which is not included inside the if..elsif (so you know what you need to add).

use warnings;
use strict;
use Term::RawInput;

sub out {
    my $out = shift;
    print "[ $out ]\n";
}

do {
    my ($keystroke,$special) = rawInput("> ");
    if($special eq 'ESC') {
        print "\n";
        exit;
    } elsif($special eq 'ENTER') {
        out($keystroke);
    } elsif($special ne 'DELETE') {
        if ($keystroke ne '') {
            out($keystroke);
        } else {
            print "'$special' key is not associated\n";
        }
    }
} while(1);

You can implement your commands inside "out";

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