6

In the following code, I was expecting something of length 96, but I get a list of length 48. Can you explain this result?

num_empty = 96
empty_vecs = as.list(1:num_empty)
for(i in 1:num_empty){empty_vecs[[i]] = c()}
length(empty_vecs)

[1] 48

Now I'll answer the question that led me to encounter this behavior. The original question was, "How do I make a list of empty vectors in R?" and the answer was "Replace c() with character() in the above code."

1 Answer 1

8

Setting list elements equal to c() (aka NULL) removes them, and this loop therefore has the effect of deleting every other element in your list. To see this, consider a smaller example, iteratively printing out the resulting vector:

e <- list(1, 2, 3, 4)
e
# [[1]]
# [1] 1
# 
# [[2]]
# [1] 2
# 
# [[3]]
# [1] 3
# 
# [[4]]
# [1] 4
# 
e[[1]] <- c()
e
# [[1]]
# [1] 2
# 
# [[2]]
# [1] 3
# 
# [[3]]
# [1] 4
# 
e[[2]] <- c()
e
# [[1]]
# [1] 2
# 
# [[2]]
# [1] 4

e[[3]] <- c()
e
# [[1]]
# [1] 2
# 
# [[2]]
# [1] 4

e[[4]] <- c()
e
# [[1]]
# [1] 2
# 
# [[2]]
# [1] 4

Note that if you actually wanted to create a list of 96 NULL values, you might try:

replicate(96, c(), FALSE)
4
  • 2
    Another way is: rep(list(NULL), 96) Commented Sep 9, 2015 at 22:58
  • Asa side note , if you do it in the reverse order for(i in num_empty:1){empty_vecs[[i]] = c()} the list will be empty.
    – agstudy
    Commented Sep 9, 2015 at 22:59
  • 2
    I might make it more clear that c() is a function that returns NULL when passed no parameters in the output. c() is not the "vector" function that everyone seems to think it is. It's for concatenating vectors. c() doesn't create an empty vector in the same way character() or numeric() does.
    – MrFlick
    Commented Sep 9, 2015 at 22:59
  • 2
    And as for why this deletes - From ?"[[" : "Note that in all three kinds of replacement, a value of ‘NULL’ deletes the corresponding item of the list."
    – Dason
    Commented Sep 9, 2015 at 23:00

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