I get two bytes, for example 0xFE and 0x70, it should represent the value of -400. How could I convert those bytes to signed short? Is it even possible?

  • 1
    Why signed char? That would only be able to contain a single byte, not two. Perhaps you mean short? Do you want this in C# or C++? What have you tried? – Luaan Sep 10 '15 at 8:38
  • Yes, short. Sorry. – Roo Sep 10 '15 at 8:39
  • 'Is it even possible?' You don't have much faith in the expressive power of computer languages. It can be done in one line of code as Richard shows below. – john Sep 10 '15 at 11:03
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Should work in C, C++ and C# (and possible java)

 short val;
 val = (byte1 << 8) | byte2;
  • Thanks, Richard. Maybe you can provide a solution how to convert it back? short to byte1 and byte2? – Roo Sep 10 '15 at 12:25
  • byte1 = (val >> 8) & 0xff; byte2 = val & 0xff; – Richard Schneider Sep 10 '15 at 23:04

In C/C++ you can use union:

union Foo {
    unsigned char bytes[sizeof(short)];
    short value;
};

. . .

bool isBigEndian()
{
    Foo foo;
    foo.value = 0x0102;
    return foo.bytes[0] == 0x01;
}

. . .

Foo foo;

if (isBigEndian()) {
    foo.bytes[0] = 0xFE;
    foo.bytes[1] = 0x70;
}
else {
    foo.bytes[1] = 0xFE;
    foo.bytes[0] = 0x70;
}

bool shouldBeTrue = foo.value == -400;

UPDATE-UPDATE. This solution is correct for big-endian and little-endian computers. Thanks for πάντα ῥεῖ.

In C# you can use BitConverter.GetBytes and BitConverter.ToInt16. To test endianess you can check BitConverter.IsLittleEndian.

  • 3
    Take care to mention endianess pitfalls for this solution. – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 10 '15 at 8:42
  • I get a value of 28926. – Roo Sep 10 '15 at 9:00
  • you a little bit wrong. For -400 it need other order Ow, you already told about big/little endian. – POTEMKINDX Sep 10 '15 at 9:10
  • @POTEMKINDX I think your the machine at the your link is little-endian. Try enter EF70 in the page scadacore.com/field-applications/programming-calculators/…, and check INT16 Big Endian field. – Mark Shevchenko Sep 10 '15 at 9:32
  • I need this in iOS app. But when I enter the FE70 in the page it shows me -400. – Roo Sep 10 '15 at 9:55

This works in C#:

byte[] arr = { 0xFE, 0x70 };
string hexStr = String.Join("", arr.Select(b => b.ToString("X")));
short res = Convert.ToInt16(hexStr, 16);

Console.WriteLine(res); // -400

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