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I am using System.IO.Packaging to work with Package files.

But it seems Package cannot open a file with read access providing FileShare.ReadWrite. Here's the code :

 myPackage = Package.Open("fileName", FileMode.Open,  FileAccess.Read,  FileShare.ReadWrite);

When I try to load a file, the following exception is thrown:

Exception thrown: 'System.NotSupportedException' in WindowsBase.dll

Additional information: Only FileShare.Read and FileShare.None are supported.

Is there anything that can be done to get this working? I need FileShare to be set to ReadWrite.

EDIT: I am trying to work with a docx file in my code. I just want to be able to read the contents of the file without modifying it. In the meanwhile I also want it to be editable using Word. This is what I am trying to achieve. I have used DotNetZip's Ionic.Zip library with success for this purpose. But i encountered some errors while saving files using that. So I had to get back to System.IO.Packaging. Any help would be appreciated.

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    The error makes perfect sense. Why would you need to write to an Archive while it's being read? The library just doesn't allow (support) that kind of concurrency. – Henk Holterman Sep 10 '15 at 9:08
  • Probably it does. But like I said in my question, I was able to do it using Ionic.Zip. But it has known issues that is critical to my other needs. – user3868244 Sep 10 '15 at 9:59
  • You should look for explicit promises that it will work. Because I don't see how one archive instance could prevent another from overwriting its internal files. They are not real files with OS protection. – Henk Holterman Sep 10 '15 at 10:25
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It's not clear why you want to do this, but you can try specifying options on file stream directly like this:

using (var file = new FileStream(@"myfile", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.ReadWrite)) {
    var myPackage = Package.Open(file);
}

UPDATE to elaborate a bit more about when this might be useful. Suppose you try to do something like this:

using (var fs1 = new FileStream("myfile", FileMode.Append, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.Read))
using (var fs2 = new FileStream("myfile", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read)) {
}

So first file is opened for writing, with FileShare = Read. Then there is another attempt to open file, for reading, again with FileShare = Read. This won't work, because if file has already been opened for write, any request with FileShare = read will fail. To make this work you have to do it like this:

using (var fs1 = new FileStream("myfile", FileMode.Append, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.Read))
using (var fs2 = new FileStream("myfile", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.ReadWrite)) {
}

Here you request FileShare.ReadWrite which allows you to read file opened by fs1 for writing.

Now, if writing and reading the same file concurrently is a good idea is completely dependent of what you want to achieve and if you know what you are doing. In most cases it's not a good idea, but again it depends.

UPDATE 2. It's perfectly possible to use code above to achieve your goal (open .docx for reading while MS Word has it open for writing:

using (var file = new FileStream(@"my.docx", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.ReadWrite)) {
    var myPackage = Package.Open(file);
    // here do what you want with your .docx
}
  • And do you think this will be safe to use? – Henk Holterman Sep 10 '15 at 9:33
  • @HenkHolterman Updated post trying to answer to your question – Evk Sep 10 '15 at 9:47
  • Disposing the stream renders the myPackage object useless. – user3868244 Sep 10 '15 at 9:48
  • Well that is just example, it's not necessary to dispose it. It is assumed that before you dispose it, you did what you want to with it. – Evk Sep 10 '15 at 9:51
  • I am sorry. I have edited the question providing more information about what I am looking to achieve. – user3868244 Sep 10 '15 at 9:53

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