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I have multiple WCF services in my project and would like to add a new method to all of them without changing any services. Is it possible to do that in c#?

Let say the services are

  1. MyService1.svc
  2. MyService2.svc
  3. Myservice3.svc

Now I want to expose a method called "HealthyStatus()" to all of them so that clients can consume this method. This method is implemented in another class called "HeathCheckerService.cs"

I DON'T want to change the web services i.e. no base class technique.

Thanks in advance.

  • What is the actual problem? Why can't you modify the services? A WCF Service class is the service and the methods are the operations. The WSDL is generated from these classes and methods. Adding a new operation means adding a new method. – Panagiotis Kanavos Sep 10 '15 at 10:08
  • Is this a versioning question? "Adding a method" means breaking the existing WSDL because you added a new operation. Are you trying to support a new operation without breaking previous clients? – Panagiotis Kanavos Sep 10 '15 at 10:09
  • "I DON'T want to change the web services i.e. no base class technique" A base class doesn't change the "web service", or rather it only changes the "web service" by specifically adding a new method on the "web service". – Aron Sep 10 '15 at 10:24
  • @Aron- What I meant was I don't want to inherit from the base class as that would mean changing the web service itself which I don't want to do. – Angad Sep 10 '15 at 10:36
  • Yes and No in answer to your question - Is this versioning issue? I want to be able to add a new method but have around 100 services so don't want to go and change all the services...Is there anyway this can be achieved without touching all 100 services ? – Angad Sep 10 '15 at 10:39
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As commenters have stated, this is not possible. You cannot extend a service contract unless you add operations to it, which will mean recompiling and redeploying your services.

One way to acheive what you want is to host a new service endpoint with an operation called HealthyStatus(), which then calls the other services (in some non-intrusive manner) and returns a status. But this would require your other services to expose an operation which could be called without consequence, and your definition of what a Healthy status actually means.

Some load balancers can be configured to provide health monitoring of http enpoints, but again, the definition of healthy here is fluid and may not be specific enough for your needs.

If you're happy to update your service, probably the least intrusive thing to do would be to create a new service contract like:

[ServiceContract] 
public interface IHealthCheckServiceContract
{    
    [OperationContract]    
    int CheckStatus(); 
}

and then have all your other service contracts implement it:

[ServiceContract] 
public interface IMyService1 : IHealthCheckServiceContract
{ 
    ...    
}

[ServiceContract] 
public interface IMyService2 : IHealthCheckServiceContract
{ 
    ...    
}

Obviously with this approach you could then subclass your service implmentations

public abstract class HealthChecker
{
    public abstract int CheckStatus();
}

public class MyService1 : HealthChecker, IMyService1
{
    public override int CheckStatus()
    {
        // MyService1 implementation of CheckStatus()
    }

    // Implementation of IMyService1 operations
    .....
}

public class MyService2 : HealthChecker, IMyService2
{
    public override int CheckStatus()
    {
        // MyService2 implementation of CheckStatus()
    }

    // Implementation of IMyService2 operations
    .....
}
  • I am happy to recomplie and redeploy. Happy to add an operation which can be attached to all 100 services I have. But don't want to go and add/update all my services. – Angad Sep 10 '15 at 10:40
  • @user1108205 please see addition to my answer. – tom redfern Sep 10 '15 at 11:04
  • You are saying something that sounds like a magic. If you update the contract, you must update references, your clients must know about the new method you've implemented. – Ricardo Pontual Sep 10 '15 at 12:11
  • @RicardoPontual - you are mistaken. Existing clients will continue to work as normal, without needed to update. Adding a new operation to an existing service contract is not a breaking change for a client. Only if they want to call the new operation do they need to update. – tom redfern Sep 10 '15 at 12:49
  • @TomRedfern what I mean is, if any client need to consume the new operation, they must update their references in order to identify the new operation and change the code. If clients don't need to call the new operation, you're right, there's no need to update the reference. – Ricardo Pontual Sep 10 '15 at 13:15

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