2

Say you notice that some of the values in your big vector of factors are similar. What is the better strategy to consolidate these values? I have used two strategies in my analyses, both of which seem comparable in performance. 1, putting the consolidation logic into a function and using sapply, and 2, altering the factor levels themselves. Below I have produced an example of each.

Example 1, putting the consolidation logic in a function and using sapply:

favorite.color <- c('yellow', 'banana', 'canary yellow', 'aqua', 'blue')
messy.vector.of.favorite.colors <- as.factor(sample(favorite.color, 10000, replace=TRUE))

consolidate.colors <- function(color) {
     if(color == 'banana') {
         return('yellow')
     }
     if(color == 'canary yellow') {
         return('yellow')
     }
     if(color == 'aqua') {
         return('blue')
     }
     else {
         return(color)
     }
}

clean.colors <- as.factor(sapply(as.character(messy.vector.of.favorite.colors), consolidate.colors, USE.NAMES=FALSE))
# Gives factor vector with two levels: blue, yellow

Example 2, directly altering the factor labels themselves:

favorite.color <- c('yellow', 'banana', 'canary yellow', 'aqua', 'blue')
messy.vector.of.favorite.colors <- as.factor(sample(favorite.color, 10000, replace=TRUE))

working.vector <- messy.vector.of.favorite.colors
levels(working.vector)[levels(working.vector) == 'banana'] <- 'yellow'
levels(working.vector)[levels(working.vector) == 'canary yellow'] <- 'yellow'
levels(working.vector)[levels(working.vector) == 'aqua'] <- 'blue'

clean.colors <- working.vector
# Gives factor vector with two levels: blue, yellow
  • 1
    In my experience dealing with factors like this is a pain. I would try converting to a string, doing a string replacement, then converting back to a factor. If you have hundreds of factors, though, this gets tedious. In that case, I would use a lookup table. – Paul James Sep 10 '15 at 19:36
  • 1
    I used to agree with you before I learned how to manipulate the levels. A lot of operations on factor actually come down to changing the levels and that's actually quite easy. Dealing with strings is highly inefficient, I would advise to avoid them where possible. – asac - Reinstate Monica Sep 10 '15 at 20:05
5

The most efficient way of doing this is to tinker with the levels. You can replace your code with:

levels(working.vector) <- list(yellow = c("yellow", "banana", "canary yellow"), 
                               blue = c("blue", "aqua"))

One liner that does the job without having to "find" values to replace in the data.

Note that levels<- is a R primitive built just for this purpose, I am pretty sure it beats most solutions performance-wise. (Edit: jeremycg just confirmed it, see below)

2

You could use a "lookup" list, similar to a python dict:

z <- list(yellow = "yellow", banana = "yellow", 'canary yellow' = "yellow", aqua = "blue", blue = "blue")

clean.colors <- factor(unlist(z[messy.vector.of.favorite.colors]))

We can benchmark the different methods, using the microbenchmark package:

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(sapply = as.factor(sapply(as.character(messy.vector.of.favorite.colors), consolidate.colors, USE.NAMES=FALSE)),
               vectorized = {working.vector <- messy.vector.of.favorite.colors;
               levels(working.vector)[levels(working.vector) == 'banana'] <- 'yellow'
               levels(working.vector)[levels(working.vector) == 'canary yellow'] <- 'yellow'
               levels(working.vector)[levels(working.vector) == 'aqua'] <- 'blue'},
               dict =  factor(unlist(z[messy.vector.of.favorite.colors])),
               changelevels = levels(working.vector) <- list(yellow = c("yellow", "banana", "canary yellow"), 
                                                             blue = c("blue", "aqua")))

Unit: microseconds
         expr       min        lq       mean     median         uq       max neval
       sapply 53521.510 54231.525 57616.0458 54751.2690 55839.3330 78979.161   100
   vectorized  1373.568  1427.713  1498.3758  1458.6240  1522.1765  2021.760   100
         dict  6284.542  6338.110  6488.8144  6395.7090  6546.4300  8763.261   100
 changelevels   511.489   544.897   581.3997   566.4005   588.4805   842.113   100

So changing the levels is the fastest.

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