276

I'm trying to get the exact JSON that is being sent in the request. Here is my code:

OkHttpClient client = new OkHttpClient();
client.interceptors().add(new Interceptor(){
   @Override public com.squareup.okhttp.Response intercept(Chain chain) throws IOException {
      Request request = chain.request();
      Log.e(String.format("\nrequest:\n%s\nheaders:\n%s",
                          request.body().toString(), request.headers()));
      com.squareup.okhttp.Response response = chain.proceed(request);
      return response;
   }
});
Retrofit retrofit = new Retrofit.Builder()
   .baseUrl(API_URL)
   .addConverterFactory(GsonConverterFactory.create())
   .client(client).build();

But I only see this in the logs:

request:
com.squareup.okhttp.RequestBody$1@3ff4074d
headers:
Content-Type: application/vnd.ll.event.list+json

How am I supposed to do proper logging, given the removal of setLog() and setLogLevel() which we used to use with Retrofit 1?

18 Answers 18

626

In Retrofit 2 you should use HttpLoggingInterceptor.

Add dependency to build.gradle:

implementation 'com.squareup.okhttp3:logging-interceptor:3.12.1'

Create a Retrofit object like the following:

HttpLoggingInterceptor interceptor = new HttpLoggingInterceptor();
interceptor.setLevel(HttpLoggingInterceptor.Level.BODY);
OkHttpClient client = new OkHttpClient.Builder().addInterceptor(interceptor).build();

Retrofit retrofit = new Retrofit.Builder()
        .baseUrl("https://backend.example.com")
        .client(client)
        .addConverterFactory(GsonConverterFactory.create())
        .build();

return retrofit.create(ApiClient.class);

The above solution gives you logcat messages very similar to the old ones set by

setLogLevel(RestAdapter.LogLevel.FULL)

In case of java.lang.ClassNotFoundException:

Older Retrofit version might require an older logging-interceptor version. Take a look at comments sections for details.

  • 26
    This was added to OkHttp just 15 days after my question, nice that community needs make such a quick impact! – Gabor Oct 21 '15 at 18:46
  • 1
    and you no longer need to add the sonatype snapshots repository to your build.gradle – James Goodwin Nov 24 '15 at 17:02
  • 13
    retrofit 2.1.0 use this compile 'com.squareup.okhttp3:logging-interceptor:3.3.1' – jayellos Jun 29 '16 at 7:46
  • 2
    @jayellos Thanks for denoting that. If you use a version lower version than 3.3.1 you will get no such method exception. – guydemossyrock Aug 16 '16 at 13:25
  • 2
    I am getting: Didn't find class "okhttp3.internal.Platform" any idea? – lrn2prgrm Oct 6 '16 at 22:49
29

I met the thing as you and I tried to ask the author of the book Retrofit: Love working with APIs on Android (here is the link) (nope! I am not making some ads for them....but they are really nice guys :) And the author replied to me very soon, with both Log method on Retrofit 1.9 and Retrofit 2.0-beta.

And here is the code of Retrofit 2.0-beta:

HttpLoggingInterceptor logging = new HttpLoggingInterceptor();  
// set your desired log level
logging.setLevel(Level.BODY);

OkHttpClient httpClient = new OkHttpClient();  
// add your other interceptors …

// add logging as last interceptor
httpClient.interceptors().add(logging);  // <-- this is the important line!

Retrofit retrofit = new Retrofit.Builder()  
   .baseUrl(API_BASE_URL)
   .addConverterFactory(GsonConverterFactory.create())
   .client(httpClient)
   .build();

This is how to add logging method with the help of HttpLoggingInterceptor. Also if you are the reader of that book I mentioned above, you may find that it says there is not log method with Retrofit 2.0 anymore -- which, I had asked the author, is not correct and they will update the book next year talking about it.

// In case you are not that familiar with the Log method in Retrofit, I would like to share something more.

Also should be noticed that there are some Logging Levels you could pick. I use the Level.BODY most of the time, which will give some thing like this:

enter image description here

You can find almost all the http staff inside the picture: the header, the content and response, etc.

And sometimes you really don't need all the guests to attend your party: I just want to know whether it's successfully connected, that internet call is successfully made within my Activiy & Fragmetn. Then you are free to use Level.BASIC, which will return something like this:

enter image description here

Can you find the status code 200 OK inside? That is it :)

Also there is another one, Level.HEADERS, which will only return the header of the network. Ya of course another picture here:

enter image description here

That's all of the Logging trick ;)

And I would like to share you with the tutorial I learned a lot there. They have a bunch of great post talking about almost everything related to Retrofit, and they are continuing updating the post, at the same time Retrofit 2.0 is coming. Please take a look at those work, which I think will save you lots of time.

  • Where does HttpLoggingInterceptor originate from? – Radu Feb 10 '16 at 7:41
  • 5
    Also, this does not work for me. httpClient.interceptors.add wants a com.squareup.okhttp.Interceptor and not a okhttp3.logging.HttpLoggingInterceptor – Radu Feb 10 '16 at 8:01
  • @Radu Which version of Retrofit are you on? Your gradle should have something like this: compile 'com.squareup.retrofit2:retrofit:2.0.0-beta4' – peitek Feb 28 '16 at 14:39
  • It would not work for logging request headers because it is necessary to add Interceptor like network interceptor! See: stackoverflow.com/a/36847027/2557258 – Yazon2006 Apr 25 '16 at 17:24
10

Here is an Interceptor that logs both the request and response bodies (using Timber, based on an example from the OkHttp docs and some other SO answers):

public class TimberLoggingInterceptor implements Interceptor {
    @Override
    public Response intercept(Chain chain) throws IOException {
        Request request = chain.request();

        long t1 = System.nanoTime();
        Timber.i("Sending request %s on %s%n%s", request.url(), chain.connection(), request.headers());
        Timber.v("REQUEST BODY BEGIN\n%s\nREQUEST BODY END", bodyToString(request));

        Response response = chain.proceed(request);

        ResponseBody responseBody = response.body();
        String responseBodyString = response.body().string();

        // now we have extracted the response body but in the process
        // we have consumed the original reponse and can't read it again
        // so we need to build a new one to return from this method

        Response newResponse = response.newBuilder().body(ResponseBody.create(responseBody.contentType(), responseBodyString.getBytes())).build();

        long t2 = System.nanoTime();
        Timber.i("Received response for %s in %.1fms%n%s", response.request().url(), (t2 - t1) / 1e6d, response.headers());
        Timber.v("RESPONSE BODY BEGIN:\n%s\nRESPONSE BODY END", responseBodyString);

        return newResponse;
    }

    private static String bodyToString(final Request request){

        try {
            final Request copy = request.newBuilder().build();
            final Buffer buffer = new Buffer();
            copy.body().writeTo(buffer);
            return buffer.readUtf8();
        } catch (final IOException e) {
            return "did not work";
        }
    }
}
6

Try this:

Request request = chain.request();
Buffer buffer = new Buffer();
request.body().writeTo(buffer);
String body = buffer.readUtf8();

After this, in the body there is the JSON you are interested in.

  • 1
    how can print the body response ? – Gilberto Ibarra Sep 25 '15 at 22:30
  • 3
    @GilbertoIbarra use String bodyString = response.body().string(); log(bodyString); response = response.newBuilder().body(ResponseBody.create(response.body().contentType(), bodyString)).build(); (You can't read response's body more than once, so you'll have to create new response with the builder) – Anton Ryabyh Sep 26 '15 at 17:41
  • It's a crutch which we not need more. Here is an example of working logging: stackoverflow.com/a/36847027/2557258 – Yazon2006 Apr 25 '16 at 17:21
4

I don't know if setLogLevel() will return in the final 2.0 version of Retrofit but for now you can use an interceptor for logging.

A good example can found in OkHttp wiki: https://github.com/square/okhttp/wiki/Interceptors

OkHttpClient client = new OkHttpClient();
client.interceptors().add(new LoggingInterceptor());

Retrofit retrofit = new Retrofit.Builder()
        .baseUrl("http://www.yourjsonapi.com")
        .addConverterFactory(GsonConverterFactory.create())
        .client(client)
        .build();
  • you either did not read my question or did not read the page you are linking to ... because LoggingInterceptor does not try to log the request body (and so does not solve my problem) – Gabor Sep 16 '15 at 0:55
  • I get 'UnsupportedOperationException' – Choletski Dec 19 '16 at 20:49
4

For those who need high level logging in Retrofit, use the interceptor like this

public static class LoggingInterceptor implements Interceptor {
    @Override public Response intercept(Chain chain) throws IOException {
        Request request = chain.request();
        long t1 = System.nanoTime();
        String requestLog = String.format("Sending request %s on %s%n%s",
                request.url(), chain.connection(), request.headers());
        //YLog.d(String.format("Sending request %s on %s%n%s",
        //        request.url(), chain.connection(), request.headers()));
        if(request.method().compareToIgnoreCase("post")==0){
            requestLog ="\n"+requestLog+"\n"+bodyToString(request);
        }
        Log.d("TAG","request"+"\n"+requestLog);

        Response response = chain.proceed(request);
        long t2 = System.nanoTime();

        String responseLog = String.format("Received response for %s in %.1fms%n%s",
                response.request().url(), (t2 - t1) / 1e6d, response.headers());

        String bodyString = response.body().string();

        Log.d("TAG","response"+"\n"+responseLog+"\n"+bodyString);

        return response.newBuilder()
                .body(ResponseBody.create(response.body().contentType(), bodyString))
                .build();
        //return response;
    }
}

public static String bodyToString(final Request request) {
    try {
        final Request copy = request.newBuilder().build();
        final Buffer buffer = new Buffer();
        copy.body().writeTo(buffer);
        return buffer.readUtf8();
    } catch (final IOException e) {
        return "did not work";
    }
}`

Courtesy: https://github.com/square/retrofit/issues/1072#

4

The main problem which I faced was dynamical adding headers and logging them into debug logcat. I've tried to add two interceptors. One for logging and one for adding headers on-the-go (token authorization). The problem was that we may .addInterceptor or .addNetworkInterceptor. As Jake Wharton said to me: "Network interceptors always come after application interceptors. See https://github.com/square/okhttp/wiki/Interceptors". So here is working example with headers and logs:

OkHttpClient httpClient = new OkHttpClient.Builder()
            //here we can add Interceptor for dynamical adding headers
            .addNetworkInterceptor(new Interceptor() {
                @Override
                public Response intercept(Chain chain) throws IOException {
                    Request request = chain.request().newBuilder().addHeader("test", "test").build();
                    return chain.proceed(request);
                }
            })
            //here we adding Interceptor for full level logging
            .addNetworkInterceptor(new HttpLoggingInterceptor().setLevel(HttpLoggingInterceptor.Level.BODY))
            .build();

    Retrofit retrofit = new Retrofit.Builder()
            .addConverterFactory(GsonConverterFactory.create(gsonBuilder.create()))
            .addCallAdapterFactory(RxJavaCallAdapterFactory.create())
            .client(httpClient)
            .baseUrl(AppConstants.SERVER_ADDRESS)
            .build();
4

If you are using Retrofit2 and okhttp3 then you need to know that Interceptor works by queue. So add loggingInterceptor at the end, after your other Interceptors:

HttpLoggingInterceptor loggingInterceptor = new HttpLoggingInterceptor();
        if (BuildConfig.DEBUG)
            loggingInterceptor.setLevel(HttpLoggingInterceptor.Level.HEADERS);

 new OkHttpClient.Builder()
                .connectTimeout(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
                .readTimeout(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
                .writeTimeout(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
                .addInterceptor(new CatalogInterceptor(context))//first
                .addInterceptor(new OAuthInterceptor(context))//second
                .authenticator(new BearerTokenAuthenticator(context))
                .addInterceptor(loggingInterceptor)//third, log at the end
                .build();
2

You can also add Facebook's Stetho and look at the network traces in Chrome: http://facebook.github.io/stetho/

final OkHttpClient.Builder builder = new OkHttpClient.Builder();
if (BuildConfig.DEBUG) {
    builder.networkInterceptors().add(new StethoInterceptor());
}

Then open "chrome://inspect" in Chrome...

2

Kotlin Code

        val interceptor = HttpLoggingInterceptor()
        interceptor.level = HttpLoggingInterceptor.Level.BODY
        val client = OkHttpClient.Builder().addInterceptor(interceptor).build()
        val retrofit = Retrofit.Builder()
                .baseUrl(BASE_URL)
                .client(client)
                .addConverterFactory(GsonConverterFactory.create())
                .build()

        return retrofit.create(PointApi::class.java)
2

this will create a retrofit object with Logging. without creating separate objects.

 private static final Retrofit retrofit = new Retrofit.Builder()
            .baseUrl(BASE_URL)
            .client(new OkHttpClient().newBuilder()
                    .addInterceptor(new HttpLoggingInterceptor().setLevel(HttpLoggingInterceptor.Level.BODY))
                    .readTimeout(READ_TIMEOUT_SECONDS, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
                    .writeTimeout(WRITE_TIMEOUT_SECONDS, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
                    .connectTimeout(CONNECTION_TIMEOUT_SECONDS, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
                    .build())
            .addConverterFactory(GsonConverterFactory.create())
            .build();
1

A best way to do this right in Retrofit 2 is to add the logger interceptor as a networkInterceptor this will print out the network headers and your custom headers too. The important thing is to remember that interceptor work as a stack and be sure u add the logger at the end of all.

OkHttpClient.Builder builder = new OkHttpClient.Builder();
builder.addInterceptor(new MyCustomInterceptor());
builder.connectTimeout(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
builder.readTimeout(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
builder.writeTimeout(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
// important line here
builder.addNetworkInterceptor(LoggerInterceptor());
1

Most of the answer here covers almost everything except this tool, one of the coolest ways to see the log.

It is Facebook's Stetho. This is the superb tool to monitor/log your app's network traffic on google chrome. You can also find here on Github.

enter image description here

1

for Retrofit 2.0.2 the code is like

   **HttpLoggingInterceptor logging = new HttpLoggingInterceptor();
        logging.setLevel(HttpLoggingInterceptor.Level.BODY);
        OkHttpClient.Builder httpClient=new OkHttpClient.Builder();
        httpClient.addInterceptor(logging);**


        if (retrofit == null) {
            retrofit = new Retrofit.Builder()
                    .baseUrl(BASE_URL)
                    .addConverterFactory(GsonConverterFactory.create())
                    **.client(httpClient.build())**
                    .build();
        }
1

First Add dependency to build.gradle:

implementation 'com.squareup.okhttp3:logging-interceptor:3.12.1'

While using Kotlin you can add Logging Interceptor like this :

companion object {
    val okHttpClient = OkHttpClient().newBuilder()
            .addInterceptor(HttpLoggingInterceptor().apply {
                level = HttpLoggingInterceptor.Level.BODY
            })
            .build()


    fun getRetrofitInstance(): Retrofit {
        val retrofit = Retrofit.Builder()
                .client(okHttpClient)
                .baseUrl(ScanNShopConstants.BASE_URL)
                .addCallAdapterFactory(RxJava2CallAdapterFactory.create())
                .addConverterFactory(GsonConverterFactory.create())
                .build()

        return retrofit
    }
}
0

I found way for Print Log in Retrofit

OkHttpClient okHttpClient = new OkHttpClient.Builder()
            .addInterceptor(new Interceptor() {
                @Override
                public Response intercept(Chain chain) throws IOException {
                    Request request = chain.request();
                    if (BuildConfig.DEBUG) {
                        Log.e(getClass().getName(), request.method() + " " + request.url());
                        Log.e(getClass().getName(), "" + request.header("Cookie"));
                        RequestBody rb = request.body();
                        Buffer buffer = new Buffer();
                        if (rb != null)
                            rb.writeTo(buffer);
                        LogUtils.LOGE(getClass().getName(), "Payload- " + buffer.readUtf8());
                    }
                    return chain.proceed(request);
                }
            })
            .readTimeout(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
            .connectTimeout(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
            .build();

            iServices = new Retrofit.Builder()
                    .baseUrl("Your Base URL")
                    .client(okHttpClient)
                    .addConverterFactory(GsonConverterFactory.create())
                    .build()
                    .create(Your Service Interface .class);

Works for me.

0

Here is a simple way to filter any request/response params from the logs using HttpLoggingInterceptor :

// Request patterns to filter
private static final String[] REQUEST_PATTERNS = {
    "Content-Type",
};
// Response patterns to filter
private static final String[] RESPONSE_PATTERNS = {"Server", "server", "X-Powered-By", "Set-Cookie", "Expires", "Cache-Control", "Pragma", "Content-Length", "access-control-allow-origin"};

// Log requests and response
HttpLoggingInterceptor interceptor = new HttpLoggingInterceptor(new HttpLoggingInterceptor.Logger() {
    @Override
    public void log(String message) {

        // Blacklist the elements not required
        for (String pattern: REQUEST_PATTERNS) {
            if (message.startsWith(pattern)) {
                return;
            }
        }
        // Any response patterns as well...
        for (String pattern: RESPONSE_PATTERNS) {
            if (message.startsWith(pattern)) {
                return;
            }
        }
        Log.d("RETROFIT", message);
    }
});
interceptor.setLevel(HttpLoggingInterceptor.Level.BODY);

Here is the full gist:

https://gist.github.com/mankum93/179c2d5378f27e95742c3f2434de7168

-10

hey guys,i already find solution:

  public static <T> T createApi(Context context, Class<T> clazz, String host, boolean debug) {
    if (singleton == null) {
        synchronized (RetrofitUtils.class) {
            if (singleton == null) {
                RestAdapter.Builder builder = new RestAdapter.Builder();
                builder
                        .setEndpoint(host)
                        .setClient(new OkClient(OkHttpUtils.getInstance(context)))
                        .setRequestInterceptor(RequestIntercepts.newInstance())
                        .setConverter(new GsonConverter(GsonUtils.newInstance()))
                        .setErrorHandler(new ErrorHandlers())
                        .setLogLevel(debug ? RestAdapter.LogLevel.FULL : RestAdapter.LogLevel.NONE)/*LogLevel.BASIC will cause response.getBody().in() close*/
                        .setLog(new RestAdapter.Log() {
                            @Override
                            public void log(String message) {
                                if (message.startsWith("{") || message.startsWith("["))
                                    Logger.json(message);
                                else {
                                    Logger.i(message);
                                }
                            }
                        });
                singleton = builder.build();
            }
        }
    }
    return singleton.create(clazz);
}
  • setLog 's callback can input every log – Vihuela Yao Sep 11 '15 at 6:44
  • this is using retrofit v1, not v2 – Gabor Sep 11 '15 at 16:45
  • Would this work for Retrofit2? – IgorGanapolsky Jan 18 '16 at 21:22

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