1

I am trying to do something similar to nested loops with makepp, and can't figure out how to do it.

Here's basically what I am trying to do.

MODULES= A B C
TEMPLATES = X Y Z


#I'd like to make a target which needs both the MODULE and TEMPLATE:

$(MODULE)/$(TEMPLATE) :
  @echo The Module is $(MODULE) and the Template is $(TEMPLATE)


#I've tried foreach, and can do something like:
$(MODULE)/$(foreach) : : foreach $(TEMPLATES)
  @echo The Module is $(MODULE) and the Template is $(foreach)

#Or I can do:
$(foreach)/$(TEMPLATE) : : foreach $(MODULES)
  @echo The Module is $(foreach) and the Template is $(TEMPLATE)

How can I create a set of rules that can work for any MODULE/TEMPLATE target?

I'd like the user to be able to have a target like:

makepp A/Z

not

makepp MODULE=A TEMPLATE=Z

Then how to make a target which would do the cross-product of all MODULES and TEMPLATES:

makepp all
The Module is A and the Template is X
The Module is A and the Template is Y
The Module is A and the Template is Z
... 
The Module is C and the Template is X
The Module is C and the Template is Y
The Module is C and the Template is Z
1
  • 1
    Is this about make (GNU or otherwise) or about makepp? Because the tags and the content seem to disagree. Sep 11, 2015 at 23:01

1 Answer 1

1

This one is tricky. I am not a makepp expert but if it is sufficiently compatible with GNU make, as it claims to be, the following should do something close from what you want:

MODULES     := A B C
TEMPLATES   := X Y Z
ALL         :=

define MODULE_TEMPLATE_rule
$(1)/$(2):
    @echo The Module is $(1) and the Template is $(2)

ALL += $(1)/$(2)
endef

define MODULE_rule
$(foreach template,$(TEMPLATES),$(eval $(call MODULE_TEMPLATE_rule,$(1),$(template))))
endef

$(foreach module,$(MODULES),$(eval $(call MODULE_rule,$(module))))

all: $(ALL)

The magic wands, here, are this mixture of foreach, call and eval. The first argument of call is a variable name. In my example these variables are defined with the define-endef construct but it does not make any difference. call expands the variable, assigning its next arguments to the $(1), $(2)... local variables. So:

$(call MODULE_TEMPLATE_rule,A,X)

for instance, will return:

A/X:
    @echo The Module is A and the Template is X

ALL += A/X

But returning is not instantiating. This is where eval enters the scene: it expands its argument and the result is parsed as any make statement. The foreach is there to iterate over the modules and templates, but you know this already.

Note that the ALL variable is progressively built by the iterators over modules and templates. So, if you type make all make will build all words in ALL, that is, print all combinations:

The Module is A and the Template is X
The Module is A and the Template is Y
The Module is A and the Template is Z
The Module is B and the Template is X
The Module is B and the Template is Y
The Module is B and the Template is Z
The Module is C and the Template is X
The Module is C and the Template is Y
The Module is C and the Template is Z

That's all. But be warned: in order to use this efficiently you must understand how make works, what it does and in what order. And here, the manual is mandatory.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.